1080 Poison

Discussion in 'General Reptile Discussion' started by Yellowtail, Nov 13, 2017.

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  1. Yellowtail

    Yellowtail Well-Known Member

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    Are there any experts on this? I have noticed that in areas where 1080 fox baiting is conducted regularly Lace and Heath Monitors are conspicuously absent while in similar areas without baiting they are common.
    Is this a result of them directly contacting baits or perhaps scavenging dead foxes? Alternatively are the foxes getting all the young goannas. I doubt it because the same areas have lots of Scrub Turkeys and Water Dragons.
    I came across a dead bluey today, a juvenile with no visible injuries, could have been dropped by a Kookaburra but it was close to a bait site.
    IMG_6571.jpg IMG_6568.jpg
     
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  2. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    20 years ago I was baiting foxes with 1080 in the Macleay Valley.. my understanding is native animals have a very high tolerance, a kookaburra could eat 10 baits without any problems whereas a fox or cat just has to lick the bait and it'll be toast. I highly doubt the baits are killing the monitors, even via secondary poisoning from scavenging dead foxes... they're just not affected by it.
     
  3. Nero Egernia

    Nero Egernia Subscriber Subscriber

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    The plant genus Gastrolobium contains sodium fluoroacetate. The synthetic form is known as 1080. Most species within this genus are endemic to the south-west of Western Australia. From my understanding our native wildlife is largely immune to it as they have evolved along side the genus, whereas exotic animals are highly susceptible. 1080 is supposed to break down quickly in the soil, but in the flesh of its victims the poison tends to remain.
     
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  4. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    Not true, the poison is non residual and quickly breaks down within a dead victim's corpse.
    What happens to the poison in the dead animals and will it kill others if they eat the carcass?
    The poison in dead animals is broken down rapidly as the body decomposes, leaving no residual poison in the environment. Poisoning of other animals is unlikely due to the very low dosage of 1080 used in wild dog baits. Most native scavengers that are likely to eat a dog carcass such as goannas and birds are less susceptible to 1080 due to their digestive system or adaptation to 1080 in the environment, and are not affected
     
  5. Ashleyyedwards7

    Ashleyyedwards7 Not so new Member

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    Most wildlife do have a high tolerance. This table shows the lethal doses for a few species. No reptiles though unfortunately, would be interesting to know.
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  6. Nero Egernia

    Nero Egernia Subscriber Subscriber

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    "However, baits, and the flesh of animals that have died from 1080 poisoning, can remain toxic to dogs and cats for months."

    This was quoted directly from DPaW's website.
     
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  7. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    That is because those are the target animals... No harm done there... the dosage is so low, a fox just needs to lick 1080 and it's game over... our native animals could roll in it and walk away.
     
  8. Nero Egernia

    Nero Egernia Subscriber Subscriber

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    Hence the poison still remains. According to DPaW.
     
  9. Yellowtail

    Yellowtail Well-Known Member

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    I knew about the West Aust situation but was not sure with NSW wildlife.
     
  10. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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  11. SpottedPythons

    SpottedPythons Well-Known Member

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    Well, the answer to YT's original question: why does the population of monitors seem to be affected by 1080? Maybe because (not sure I'm right, but this is my hypothesis) 1080 is placed in areas where the feral animals are found in higher numbers. So perhaps it's not the 1080 killing large monitors, but 1080's target out competing/preying on them.
     
  12. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    Sorry I got lost right at the last bit of your post... I was up until 2am this morning so I'm a bit dusty lol
     
  13. Yellowtail

    Yellowtail Well-Known Member

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    Interesting and I did offer the alternative that the foxes were preying on young monitors. The area in question is part of Lane Cove National Park and there are plenty of prey species there for large monitors including large numbers of nesting birds including turkeys and if foxes are such a problem why are they not wiping out the turkeys and water dragons. Similar areas in nearby (and connected) Berowra Waters and Kuringai National Parks have large numbers of monitors. One other explanation is the frequency and severity that these areas have been burnt.
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2017
  14. danyjv

    danyjv Active Member

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    Nothing to do with the topic but Lane cove NP . I was going to take the kids there on the weekend but ended up at Dural they have a small diesel and steam miniature train thing there. Hope fully we go to lane cove np this weekend . Let me know if there a good spot to take the kids 2 and 3 year old there yellow tail , thanks ..


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  15. Yellowtail

    Yellowtail Well-Known Member

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    I go bushwalking at the Pennant Hills end but there are nice picnic areas alongside the river at the eastern end, access from Lady Game Drive Chatswood West or Lane Cove Rd West Pymble, lots of big tame water dragons there because people feed them.
     
  16. Wilfred

    Wilfred Not so new Member

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    Righto so 1080 is the devil in national parks I have seen nere 1 drop in a 100 meter radius 1 deer 2 dogs and 1 lace monitor. 1080 comes in a different variety so doses very and who ever drops can change a dose I have seen hunting dogs chew on something dead and on the way home die what we believe to have been killed by 1080
     
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