A Boiga Queary...or Rather a Few

Discussion in 'Australian Snakes' started by Herpo, Jun 10, 2016.

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  1. Herpo

    Herpo Well-Known Member

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    Hey guys,

    This is just really to continue the boiga questions I had while not hijacking Stuarts thread. Anyway, following what I was told, I am now considering, perhaps getting a night tiger as my next reptile if I go for a snake and not a lizard. I do have a few questions though:

    -How are they to handle. I don't mean handling like I do Popeye. This would be a hands off animal. But I like to keep track of Popeye's weight, and intend to do the same with my next reptile. So how would you go about weighing one really, is it possible for them to tolerate handling enough to get them into a bowl to weigh?

    -What is the venom like? Is it only localised swelling. Also, I know they're rear-fanged, so would I be correct in saying a simple strike wouldn't be enough to inject venom? Other rear fangs, such as the hognoses, tend to chew their prey to inject venom.

    -How large an enclosure is necessary?

    -How old to purchase?

    -Any reputable breeders?

    If I were to go through with this, I wouldn't end up with the animal until late this year, or next year, so that's plenty of time to learn and take it easy.

    Any help is appreciated,
    Herpo
     
  2. HiramAbiff

    HiramAbiff Not so new Member

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    Some calm down quite well, a simple rule with these guys is to not let their head touch your body as they are sneaky biters as well as strikers. They can be crawling up your arm one second and the next they turn their heads, open their mouths and have a chew on your arm.

    Like all venoms every person reacts differently. Some people have only slight localised symptoms while others suffer from nausea, I've heard of someone being hospitalised for 2 days after a bite from a reliable source but I dare say you'd have to be pretty unlucky for them to have that great of an effect.

    They actually do well in a wide variety of enclosures as long as they are given branches to climb as well as both terrestrial and arboreal hides.

    All in all they are pretty easy to keep, some will feed more readily than others. Some specimens won't feed from tongs and will drop the food item if you happen to walk in on them at the wrong time. Others will feed from tongs without a problem.

    All in all they are a pretty easy species to keep.
     
  3. kalo1993

    kalo1993 Not so new Member

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    From my limited experience with them (i have 3 atm) the only problems i have faced so far is one case of stuck shed, so i recommend keeping the humidity high (around 70%) when they are in shed.

    For handling it would depend on the individual snake, 1 of mine is chill while the other 2 are very defensive, i handle all 3 with a hook and tailing and have never been bitten...yet.

    As long as the snake is healthy and a consistent feeder than it wont matter how old it is.

    I recommend also researching care requirements of other more commonly kept Boiga species such as Boiga dendrophila as i assume there care would be quite similar.

    There is a few for sale right now on RDU if your interested :D anyways good luck they are great snakes to keep.
     
  4. andynic07

    andynic07 Very Well-Known Member

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    I too only have limited experience with captive boigas but as [MENTION=42322]kalo1993[/MENTION] had issues with a shed. I received mine whilst it was blue and 4-5 days later it had issues shedding. It came from NT so it had very high humidity and very warm nights. I assist shed it by hand and found out that they can move their jaws with great agility to get a bite on. There was no envenomation. I have had quite a bit of experience with wild boigas and found most quite good to handle. I have never been envenomated touch wood. A friend of mine was bitten and envenomated by one whilst herping one night. He realised there was some reaction straight away and had his friend drive straight to hospital where he suffered from anaphylaxis. He is now allergic to one component of the venom which is apparently quite common in many Australian snakes.
     
  5. Herpo

    Herpo Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for all you replies!

    Anyway, thanks for you the info kalos. I am seriously considering them, so any info is good. Although I wouldn't purchase now, as I have my dad to convince. He isn't to keen on something venomous, so I might have some research to do.

    @andynic, that's interesting. I didn't know snakes could give dry bites. The alergies are always a problem. I guess that's the main thing even keeping me weary. I am not just playing with a snake, but peoples perception of them, and a severe reaction certainly wouldn't help.

    Hmm, all things to consider I guess...
     
  6. Stuart

    Stuart Site Admin Staff Member

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    Not much to add on the answers above as from my experience that covers the most of it. A few more things though.
    1. Make sure you get one that is confirmed feeding on thawed rodents. They can be a very testy animal to get onto rodents if not started at a young age
    2. Handling is limited. If you are doing the basics they can be OK but as Hiram said, they are sneaky biters too and I can say from experience they can be chewing for a while before you realise it.
    3. The more hides the better. All my adults are in a 1200hx400wx500d and have 4 hides to choose from. Any less that that I have found I never saw them as much and they were finicky eaters.
    4. It is really good to see you not dismissing their venom and you doing further research. Even a mildly venomous snake can cause all sorts of issues. I have had a number of bites (all my fault) and have only noticed very minimal affects however my wife has been tagged and suffered differently.

    That's the most basic info in a nutshell and I am certainly no expert however they will keep you on your toes and I am happy to share what I know.
     
  7. andynic07

    andynic07 Very Well-Known Member

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    My my mates account of his bite.


    image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg
     
  8. Stuart

    Stuart Site Admin Staff Member

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    Cheers for sharing that
     
  9. Burgo89

    Burgo89 Active Member

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    [MENTION=34534]andynic07[/MENTION] did your mate feel left out with the camera man getting all the kisses he had to get one for himself?
     
  10. andynic07

    andynic07 Very Well-Known Member

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    Lol, they were both photographing the snake. He is a very experienced keeper and herper. [MENTION=40472]Burgo89[/MENTION]
     
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