Albino Colours?

Discussion in 'Herp Help' started by edendj01, Jul 1, 2014.

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  1. edendj01

    edendj01 Not so new Member

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    hey I have an albino Darwin python and when talking to the breeder about the colouring he said that the colours can range from yellow-white-orange-pinks-red and even a fluorescent green! upon hearing about the very unlikely chance of green, has anyone ever had an albino that has turned a green or an unusual colour? pictures would be appreciated!:D
     
  2. Thyla

    Thyla Well-Known Member

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    Albino by definition are white. Some may have a red coloured eye. Some may look pink but that is due to the blood being red so you get a light red colour (pink). Everything else is not an albino.
     
  3. edendj01

    edendj01 Not so new Member

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    ok cool1 thankyou!
     
  4. Thyla

    Thyla Well-Known Member

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    Yeah this breeder is telling you porkies claiming colours like orange, yellow and fluorescent green are albino. Albino's are rare, and as such, fetch a high dollar. You can understand why a breeder would make up this information if he or she also happens to have a yellow, orange and fluorescent green animal in his or her collection.
     
  5. Vixen

    Vixen Very Well-Known Member

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    Thyla not sure if your pulling his leg, but you say albinos can never have yellow or strange tints such as lavender etc?
     
  6. RedFox

    RedFox Very Well-Known Member

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    [MENTION=18811]Thyla[/MENTION] care to explain your comment a bit further?

    Albinism means the animal produces no melanin. Albino Darwins for example are known for having yellow, lavender, orangey, etc colours on a white back ground.
     
  7. beastcreature

    beastcreature Suspended Banned

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    Edendj, take a look at the 'Darwin thread' to see some variation in Darwins.

    The terminology used to segregate colours & patterns is open to debate, what we think we know today can change tomorrow, that being the nature of genetics.
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2014
  8. Jacknife

    Jacknife Very Well-Known Member

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    Every colour mentioned aside from flouro green(really!?) falls well within the realm of albino. Albinism is the lack of melanin; therefore the varying colours can still leave remnants ranging from reds through to high white, as it's not always 100% absent...
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2014
  9. aspidito

    aspidito Well-Known Member

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    Fluoro greens are the most beautiful colours in a Albino, not all Darwin albinos are like this some are just orange & white.
    The first 4 pics are 2 of my adults & then a 2 yr old & 1 yr old but all produced from this adult pair develop into high Fluoro tri coloured individuals.
     

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  10. Wild~Touch

    Wild~Touch Very Well-Known Member

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    Google....Dr.Travis Wyman he explains perfectly the differing "shades of albino"

    he is speaking to Nick Mutton on Herp Nation Radio
     
  11. pythonmum

    pythonmum Subscriber Subscriber

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    Thyla's comment is valid for mammals, but not reptiles. Mammals only have melanin, but reptiles have melanin, xanthanins and pyridines, giving them a much greater range of coloration. It is a great joy to watch an albino Darwin gain its colours. This process takes a year or so, with colouration becoming more intense and pattern more defined as you go. My female (photo in signature) has lovely pale lavender colours, while my male has some very intense high contrast oranges. Both have a pale flourescent yellow that glows in full spectrum sunlight. Photos never quite capture the colours, but it is fun trying.
     
  12. edendj01

    edendj01 Not so new Member

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    ok thankyou everyone for your input I really appreciate it! yea I wasn't sure if he was lying or not! thanks
     
  13. saximus

    saximus Almost Legendary

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    Maybe Thyla was just trying to be technical? I think it’s pretty common knowledge that what we refer to as “albinism” in reptiles is amelanism.
     
  14. beastcreature

    beastcreature Suspended Banned

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    Even then, where terminology is concerned it depends on the animal you're talking about & in which circles you're travelling

    Take the gene thought responsible for 'cremello' horses & 'white' doberman for instance, the cremello people will tell you it's not albinism while the doberman people will tell you it's tyrosine positive albinism.
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2014
  15. AllThingsReptile

    AllThingsReptile Very Well-Known Member

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    Older/More experienced members correct me if I'm wrong, but i was always under the impression that "Albino" reptiles, are completely lacking any Melanin (Black Pigment) and a "hypo" has reduced melanin but some is still present/visible.
    Therefore an Albino can be quite a range of colours, excluding black and/or colour containing black/dark pigments
     
  16. Red-Ink

    Red-Ink Very Well-Known Member

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    That's correct as [MENTION=3093]pythonmum[/MENTION] said, reptiles have other pigmentations that affect their colour.

    Anybody know if the yanks have produced Albino chams yet? Now that would be interesting.....
     
  17. Porkbones

    Porkbones Well-Known Member

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    Yes im im enjoying watching my little girl change colour.its great to see the change
     
  18. Thyla

    Thyla Well-Known Member

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    Oh... I had to be the first one to comment didn't I :p

    From what I understand albino means lacking in malanin (black colour). Many people would look at a lutino Blue and Gold macaw and call it an 'albino', but it is technically not an albino.
    I thought the albino term was used for pure white looking animals. And many other terms used for variations of colour morphs, melanistic, hypomelanistic, leucistic etc.
    I guess I was wrong.
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2014
  19. Thyla

    Thyla Well-Known Member

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    I thought using the 'reply with Quote' button was foolproof. I guess not. Omitting a word like 'lutino' can have a dramatic impact on my statement. Please re-read my above post, and don't misquote me in future.

    I guess the point I was trying to make with the lutino blue and gold macaw is that something like this;

    [​IMG]

    I use to call albino but it is actually lutino (xanthochromism). So maybe there are animals out there with yellow colouring that are actually lutino and have been mislabelled as albinos. Thoughts?
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2014
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