Albino Darwin Python - Albino Gene

Discussion in 'Australian Snakes' started by PythonNoobe, Nov 9, 2019.

  1. PythonNoobe

    PythonNoobe Not so new Member

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    Hi,
    Will get some albinos if you breed a Albino Darwin with a normal Darwin Python? (if it has the gene)
    I assume you need the gene on both sides to end up with albino?

    Thanks
     
  2. Herptology

    Herptology Well-Known Member

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    If it carries the gene but not showing it, it’ll be a 100% het albino

    so you will get albinos and 100% het from breeding those 2
     
  3. PythonNoobe

    PythonNoobe Not so new Member

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    Thats the confusing part if it has the gene 100% albino why is it not albino?
    So it has the gene from its mother and father? But it does not show?.....
     
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  4. Mick666

    Mick666 Well-Known Member

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    Albino gene is recessive, so you need the gene from both parents. 100% het means it carries the gene, 50% het means it has a 50% chance of having the gene (if one parent is het and the other isn't.)
    het to normal = 50% hets
    het to het = 25% visual, the rest have a 66% chance of carrying the gene
    visual to het = 50% visual, and the rest will be 100% het
    visual to visual = all visual
     
  5. PythonNoobe

    PythonNoobe Not so new Member

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    Thanks, just dont follow how it becomes 66% if they are 50% (each snake carries the gene on one side of their DNA either form Mum or Dad) So each has a 50% chance to contribute it to the hatchlings? So 25% will be visual (get it from both) 25% will get the non gene (some must get the non gene form both) and 50% will get the gene on one side from either parent. (all based on average)
    Thats the part that just does not make sense!

    Thanks
     
  6. Southernserpent

    Southernserpent Active Member

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    I will try and explain it another way.
    With a het x het pairing
    1/4 visual
    2/4 normal looking hets
    1/4 normal
    So of the normal looking snakes 2/3 of them will be hets but you can't tell.
    2/3 = 66% chance of anyone of them being a het.
    I hope that makes sense
     
  7. Sdaji

    Sdaji APS Veteran APS Veteran

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    The bit you're confused about it what the %s refer to. They are probabilities of what the snake is, not what it will pass on.

    A 100% het means we are 100% sure it is a het, not that it is going to pass the albino allele (wrongly called the albino gene) to 100% of its offspring.

    50% and 67% hets are either het or not het. We just don't know yet. Once we prove them out they become either 0% or 100% hets. Any het will pass on the albino allele ('gene') to 50% of its offspring.

    Part of the confusion comes from the terminology being used incorrectly. For example, every single snake has two copies of every albinism gene, whether they are albino, het or not het. This is easy to understand if you use correct terminology but seems insane if you're only familiar with the common herp version of genetics (which is wrong). It's often difficult to explain the concepts because people only understand an incorrect version of the story, and if you try to teach them the correct version no one in the herp world will understand it.
     
  8. PythonNoobe

    PythonNoobe Not so new Member

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    "50% and 67% hets are either het or not het."
    50% would still count? EG had one gene (so 50% chance to pass on that gene and 50% to pass on a non het gene) but not both which would make them a 100% het?

    " if you try to teach them the correct version no one in the herp world will understand it."
    Yes thats why what they are saying does not make sense and confuses me.

    Thanks
     
  9. Sdaji

    Sdaji APS Veteran APS Veteran

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    I'm not sure what you mean by '50% would still count'

    Every snake is either normal, het or albino. There are not different types of hets. Every het is a het and if it's not a het it's not a het. There is nothing in between. The percentages don't refer to the chance of what will be passed on. It is our estimate of what something is.

    A snake is either het or not het, but if we don't know what it is, we are not able to call it a het or non het, because we don't know. If we call it a 50% het we mean we don't know what it is, but it has a 50% chance of being a het based on what we do know. If it's a 67% het we deduce there is a 67% chance that it is a het. If it is a 100% het, we know that it is a het. If they actually are hets, any of them will breed with the same.outcomes. If I sell you a 50% het I'm saying I don't know what that snake is, but there is a 50% chance it is a het and a 50% chance it is not a het. If you buy it and breed it to an albino, based on the offspring, you can either determine it is a het in which case it is now a 100% het (it is still the same snake but has gone from a 50% het to a 100% het, not because anything about the snake has changed, just because what we know about it has changed) or a non het (again, the snake didn't change, we just learned more about it).

    All hets have the same odds of passing on an albino or wildtype allele ('gene') so in that sense there are not different types of hets.
     
  10. Mick666

    Mick666 Well-Known Member

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    Aa = het
    AA = normal
    aa = visual

    So with two het parents (Aa), if you get a hypothetical clutch off 100 babies
    25 will be visual (aa)
    75 babies will look normal. Of those 75, 50 will be hets (Aa).
    Leaving 25 normal's that are not hets (AA).

    Ball-Python-Breeding-Punnett-Square-Blog.jpg
    --- Automatic Post Merged, Dec 18, 2019, Original Post Date: Dec 18, 2019 ---
    I have 20 of these in the incubator, I'm so eggcited.
    HBCZJ - SG.JPG
     
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