Albino

Discussion in 'Herp Help' started by iHerp, Oct 17, 2013.

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  1. iHerp

    iHerp Active Member

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    how can something be 100% het albino but not be albino itself
     
  2. Chris1

    Chris1 cupcake Subscriber

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    100% het means it definately is a het.

    50% het means it has a 50% chance of being a het.
     
  3. mikey_mike

    mikey_mike Active Member

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    Heterozygote means it contains both genes. Albino mutation is recessive so hets always resemble wildtype (normal) animals.
     
  4. saximus

    saximus Almost Legendary

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    Maybe Google recessive genes so you can get a better understanding
     
  5. slide

    slide Well-Known Member

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  6. Trimeresurus

    Trimeresurus Guest

    Because het isn't what % albino it is.
     
  7. ronhalling

    ronhalling Subscriber Subscriber

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    I find myself in the same situation as the OP sometimes and wish someone would just give a simple answer like " 100% Het in a mating gives a better chance of an Albino in the clutch" or something like that instead of sending them looking at Genetics sites. (please don't take my example as being the answer, it was just a simplified type answer for example) I know there are thousands of sites for peeps to get the answer from but i think it would be nice for someone who knows to just say x+y=t regardless of how many times it has been said here, IMO it would just be a nice courtesy. :) ..............................Ron
     
  8. oreo1

    oreo1 Well-Known Member

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    Actually a heterozygous animal does have both alleles. To put simply, a homozygote is an animal that has two of the same alleles for a particular trait, whereas a heterozygote has two different alleles for the trait.

    For example: offspring will always receive one gene from each parent. If one parent is homozygous for wild type colouration (the genes can be represented by ‘BB’) and the other parent is also homozygous for wild type colouration, the offspring produced can only be homozygous wild types. No matter which of the 2 genes is received from the parent, the offspring's genetic code can only be BB = wild type. The wild type colouration is a dominant trait, which means an animal may have a mixture of one wild type (dominant) gene as well as one mutant or albino (recessive) gene, yet the wild type gene dominants so the animal is perceived as wild type. Animals with this mixture of wild type and mutant genes are heterozygotes, where the genes can be represented by ‘Bb’. Heterozygotes are carriers of the albino trait. By crossing two heterozygous animals (Bb x Bb), roughly 75% of the offspring should be wild types (25% = BB, 50% = Bb) and only 25% will be albino (bb). Albino animals are so rare because they can only be made when they have two copies of the recessive gene, bb. Furthermore, this means that the offspring of two albino parents will all be albino.

    The expression, ‘100% heterozygous for albino’, simply means the said animal is definitely a carrier of the albino gene (Bb). A 50% het means there is a 50/50 chance the animal is a carrier of the gene (since there is no way to tell for sure what the genetic code of the offspring are without doing a DNA test).
     
  9. Flaviruthless

    Flaviruthless Very Well-Known Member

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    Calculating Breedings:

    A = albino allele, a = normal allele.

    When breeding two normals:

    aa x aa = All aa

    When breeding a het and a normal:

    Aa x aa = Aa (50%) and aa (50%) - you get 100% normal looking animals but 50% of them are het for albinism.

    When breeding two hets:

    Aa x Aa = AA (25%), Aa (50%) and aa (25%) - 25% are albinos, 50% are hets and 25% are normals. This is where a 66% het comes from (as there is a 2/3 chance of getting a het when picking a hatchlings).

    When breeding a normal and an albino:

    aa x AA = 100% Aa (all 100% het albinos).

    When breeding a het and an albino:

    Aa x AA = AA (50%) and aa (50%) - 50% albinos and 50% hets. Where the two alleles are the same it is an albino and where there is only one albino allele it is a het.

    When breeding two albinos:

    AA x AA = All AA - as there are no other genes. !00% albinos in the clutch.

    The reason that you cannot visually determine what is a het is because albinism in carpet pythons is recessive; this means that unless there are two copies of the albino allele it doesn't show.
     
  10. thomasssss

    thomasssss Very Well-Known Member

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    Flaviruthless- very well put for people like me , i already had a fair understanding of albinos but still hadnt worked out how people got to 66% hets , now i do :) cheers
     
  11. zack13

    zack13 Well-Known Member

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    I think you may mean phenotype. What it looks like cause a het has both alleles. You can't have only one since you get one from each parent. You must have two. Homozygous means two of the same, where as heterozygous means two different ones.
     
  12. flaviruthless takes the time to write the reply im to lazy to write :D
     
  13. ronhalling

    ronhalling Subscriber Subscriber

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    I actually understand it put that way, it is almost Algebra but on a genetic level. Thanks for that Flaviruthless, that would almost make a good sticky for those of us without a scientific or educational background, +1 :) ...................................Ron

    - - - Updated - - -

    That might be but your input into this forum is invaluable. :) .............................Ron
     
  14. wokka

    wokka Guest

    I agree it is either a het or it is not a het. The idea of 50% het seems deceptive to me. Can i get ten hets and ten normals and sell the normals as 50% hets to command a higher price?
     
  15. =bECS=

    =bECS= Very Well-Known Member

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    So in layman terms, it refers to a chance at the lucky dip...?
    100% het = yes you will definitely pick a snake that has the albino gene
    66%, 50% and 25% hets = the percentage of chance you have of picking a snake with the albino gene given the amount of snakes in the clutch that theoretically should hold the gene.

    Is it basically like gambling odds? lol
     
  16. andynic07

    andynic07 Very Well-Known Member

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    And they are only theoretical odds as well aren't they?
     
  17. =bECS=

    =bECS= Very Well-Known Member

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    You quoted before I edited it :p
    I'm not up to speed on the whole het thing, that's my understanding of it but I'm not sure if its correct.
    All I know is what I was once told by an albino breeder, either get a 100% het or an albino because otherwise its just a guess and luck if you end up with a het, but there's usually a better chance you will end up with an overpriced normal.

    I think unless its a 100% het, they should be simply sold at normal prices, not marked up because of a chance it might not be normal. There are plenty of albinos around these days, its not like it was when they first came out, when paying a bit extra for the chance of the albino gene was considered viable.
     
  18. saximus

    saximus Almost Legendary

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    I remember seeing a thread on here that they are usually priced accordingly. So a 50% would be more than a known normal, a 66% would be more than a 50% and a 100% would be more than a 66%. So, like you said, the pricing is similar to a gamble for both the buyer and seller. Regardless, an animal is worth what someone is willing to pay for it and albinos Carpets aren't the only recessive animals being sold so it is fair in other instances.
    Just FYI, there is no such thing as a 25% het either.
     
  19. =bECS=

    =bECS= Very Well-Known Member

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    See, shows I'm not up to speed on the genetics of it, I just understood it was the % of chance :p

    I'm sure you would remember the prices of albino darwins when they were first put up for sale, compared to now, the market has almost been flooded with them, same with roughies and prices of bhp, woma etc all have dropped with the amount of people breeding them now.

    Albino darwins can go for less than 1k now

    They are all common, not rare like before, and there is always some sort of new morph everyone wants..... lately it seems to be jags or zebras etc

    That's why I think people should either sell as a guaranteed het or just sell at normal prices with the chance of it being a het when it comes to albino darwins. Each year the amount that reach breeding age and the amount of their offspring that hit the market rises, the market becomes flooded and people start to go for either 100% hets or an albino, the demand for less than 100% hets is falling compared to past years.

    Of course this wouldn't to albino olives atm, because they are still fairly scarce (and like when the albino darwins hit) people are willing to pay more for that chance for a het considering the prices for an actual albino.

    But that's just economics, availability and buyers demand. Every snake is worth whatever someone is willing to pay for it, but I dont think it will be long before albino darwins drop in price even more and nobody will want hets unless they are 100%
     
  20. wokka

    wokka Guest

    Would that depend if you new which ones were the hets and which ones were not?

    - - - Updated - - -

    If you had 1 clutch from albino to normal and 3 clutches from normal to normal, mixed them up, then would they be 25% hets?
     
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