Amazing new fact about Angle headed dragons!!!

Discussion in 'Reptile News' started by AusReptiles88, Jan 4, 2012.

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  1. AusReptiles88

    AusReptiles88 Not so new Member

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    As far as I know this has never been documented. I came home from work just before and did my usual check of my collection.

    I have 3 angle headed dragons, one hatchling and an adult pair. I had been slowing down on the feeding of the adult female because she has a tendency to put on weight.

    I was feeding her 1-2 large crickets a day, now shes on just 1 medium a day. Antway, when i looked in the enclosure I saw her on the ground, her throat pouch vastly extended, and my first thought had been correct. She had eaten the hatchling dragon, something I was told shouldn't happen yet had my concerns about. She seemed to have difficulty breathing and the sharp spinal scales could have been causing her pain, so I got some tweezers and opened her mouth and removed my poor little dragon.

    I am a bit sad about losing him, he had a lot of personality and used to 'head bob' frequently. But i'm glad my female is looking ok, i think i will increase her food, stuff obeisity!
     
  2. cadwallader

    cadwallader Very Well-Known Member

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    that suck how big was the hatchling?
     
  3. Jonno from ERD

    Jonno from ERD Very Well-Known Member

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    Hi AusReptiles,

    Sorry to hear about your young dragon, however this is hardly surprising. Nearly all reptile species that are housed together with a reasonable size difference run the risk of the smaller one falling prey to the larger.

    Your feeding rate is curious too - if you have a pair, the female should be clutching and you could theoretically feed her as many crickets as she can handle without her becoming obese.
     
  4. AusReptiles88

    AusReptiles88 Not so new Member

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    The hatchling was about 5cm maybe? Jonno from ERD, i was told they were a pair but nothing has happened yet :( thats why she's only been on 1-2 crikets.

    I didn't know most dragons could or would become cannibals, i'd change the heading if i could, not so amazing now huh?
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2012
  5. Bluetongue1

    Bluetongue1 Guest

    There are a number of points to be made here. Firstly, many reptiles in nature will eat their own species if they are small enough and given the opportunity. This is much the reason why young water dragons, for instance, form colonies away from the adults. Tuatara young are active at a different time to the adults for that self same reason. And there are many more examples. The second thing to bear in mind is that what is typical behaviour in nature may not be so typical under captive conditions. Small individuals that might normally associate with a colony in nature, also have the opportunity to go elsewhere if food gets scarce. In captivity, they have nowhere to go.

    If the female has attempted to eat a young one of its own species, then the obvious conclusion is that the female is hungry and she needs more to eat than she is currently receiving. That is something you need to look at and address.

    I am sorry for your loss. It can be heartbreaking under the best of circumstances and absolutely devastating where you feel that it is due to something you have done. So take the positive out of it – a learning experience which you have generously and wisely shared with others. I reckon all experienced keepers would have some experience of the advice given by other who should know, coming undone with disastrous results.

    Blue
     
  6. KaotikJezta

    KaotikJezta Very Well-Known Member

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    Sorry for the loss of your little one, but having kept Angle Heads, I would say 1-2 crickets per feed for an adult female is not nearly enough.
     
  7. AusReptiles88

    AusReptiles88 Not so new Member

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    thanks for your comments guys, it has been a learning opportunity and i just hope others have learned something from it.
     
  8. SteveNT

    SteveNT Very Well-Known Member

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  9. black_headed_mon

    black_headed_mon Well-Known Member

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    and to think i feel bad after a dog broke into our chicken coop and had a free feed..........................shaking head.................hopefully something is learned here:(
     
  10. KREPS2011

    KREPS2011 Well-Known Member

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    Hey mate. I have noticed that they take a very long time to lay their eggs. Had taken mine 2 months to lay once i felt eggs in her. Not sure why it had takin so long but she did have a massive clutch of 8 eggs.
    You might think she is over weight but then she may be clutching. The best thing to do is just keep feeding her like usual and everything should be fine.
     
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