Banjo tadpoles

Discussion in 'Newbies forum' started by Silvia N, Nov 24, 2017.

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  1. Silvia N

    Silvia N New Member

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    I have a large pond at Mt Barker (SA) and have Frogs/tadpoles (spotted marsh) but would desperately like some banjos as love the sound of their “bonk”. Have been trying to find banjo tadpoles for years with no success (they have always been tadpoles from spotted marsh frogs). What would be the best way to introduce banjos to my pond? I have been waiting patiently but they have not come of their own accord. Does anyone have tadpoles for sale? The marsh frogs seem quite happy and have tadpoles each year. The pond is clean, with about 18 inches (depth) of water (12ft x 8ft area) and has water plants (lilies etc.) They have protection from predators (floating mesh), plenty of surrounding vegetation and there are no fish. Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated. Am desperate to have Pobble-bonks in my pond !
     
  2. pinefamily

    pinefamily Subscriber Subscriber

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    Welcome to APS.
    Have you rung Fish Haven at Pooraka, or Pets Everywhere at Kilburn? If either of those don't have any, they should know where to get them. Fingers crossed.
     
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  3. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    Just curious, have you heard any calls of a night time of the banjos nearby?? Have you gone frogging?? Is there any evidence they're in your immediate area at all??
     
  4. vampstorso

    vampstorso Very Well-Known Member

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    Little bit of a drive,
    But P&K pets on Magill road usually have them.

    They usually have both frogs and tadpoles
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2017
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  5. Scutellatus

    Scutellatus Well-Known Member

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    That sounds like an awesome pond Silvia. Do you have any photos you could show us? It sounds like frog heaven!
     
  6. pinefamily

    pinefamily Subscriber Subscriber

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  7. vampstorso

    vampstorso Very Well-Known Member

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    Yeah I'm by mt Barker and their wetlands have them. You can hear them as you walk around it
     
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  8. Nero Egernia

    Nero Egernia Subscriber Subscriber

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    I have Western Banjo Frogs (Limnodynastes dorsalis) at my residence. They don't visit my pond. Although I can hear them calling from nearby dams and on occasion I'll sometimes accidentally dig them up when gardening. Sometimes I'll see them at night, but they're generally light shy and will quickly flee. Not like the tree frogs which appear to be quite happy to stick around. Truly, I find tree frogs in some very odd places.
     
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  9. Bluetongue1

    Bluetongue1 APS Veteran APS Veteran

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    @Silvia N. If there are no males calling from around your pond then it could be a lack of suitable calling sites. Both east and west coast Banjos call from dense cover nearby ponds or fairly static water. So even if you get some tadpoles (which take a year or more to develop into frogs from eggs), they will probably not call and breed there without thick cover nearby the water that allows the males to remain concealed when calling. They do their travelling (spread out) during wet weather and bury themselves during more arid periods. That’s why Oshkii has occasionally unearth one in the garden but never hears them calling. The same may be true for you – they are likely there already as frogs but won’t breed there. See if you can visit a local dam or other spot where Banjo’s are known to call and that will give you a better idea of what is required.

    L. tasmaniensis only need grassy vegetation around and adjacent to the water and they come out of the grass and call from the water’s edge.
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2017
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