Bloodshot eyes on my dragon

Discussion in 'Herp Help' started by Lizard750, Sep 16, 2018.

  1. Lizard750

    Lizard750 New Member

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    Hi all,

    I’ve done a search and can’t seem to find much on bloodshot eyes. Just wondering if anyone knows why his eyes might be looking this bloodshot? Is it something serious to worry about or is there an explanation.
    I have 2 dragons, the other one has red eyes a bit but not as bad as this one.
    I have them in a 5ft tank with filtered water section and land/dirt area (they love to dig in) I’m gonna replace my UV globe, thinking that could be a factor.
    If anyone has any experience or knowledge of this, your advice would be greatly appreciated.

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  2. GhoulGecko

    GhoulGecko Not so new Member

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    That doesn't look very good. Quick question, do you bathe your dragon regularly and keep it hydrated? I've heard that is sometimes a factor.
     
  3. Lizard750

    Lizard750 New Member

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    They are always in the water, they have a waterfall and large water area.
     
  4. Bl69aze

    Bl69aze Very Well-Known Member

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    Is it possibly pneumonia? I know other species such as rodents will bleed from the eyes and nose if they have it
     
  5. GBWhite

    GBWhite Well-Known Member

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    Reddish bloodshot eyes in dragons is usually associated with the UVB being too strong and/or in too close a proximity to the lizard. Try turning your UVB off for a couple of days and see what happens. It won't harm the lizard, just make sure you leave the basking lite on so they can remain warm. Sometimes bathing the eye with a week saline solution a couple of times a day while the UVB is off can also help. Are you using a UV globe or tube?
     
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  6. Lizard750

    Lizard750 New Member

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    It’s a tube, I have turned it off for now to see if it helps.
    I also run a normal ‘sunlight’ tube (not UVB) could this be damaging to their eyes too or just the UVB?
    I’m not sure how I’m gonna prevent them from getting right up there. May have to look at building their next enclosure sooner rather than later!
     
  7. GhoulGecko

    GhoulGecko Not so new Member

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    Okay cool so that is obviously not a factor in your enclosure. Otherwise, definitely change the UVB.
     
  8. GBWhite

    GBWhite Well-Known Member

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    If the "sunlight" tube doesn't emit UVB then it should be okay. UVB Tubes usually produce low levels of UVB resembling outdoor shade areas and are more suitable for species that don't bask in full sunlight. However at close range or if a reflector is used the UVB may become too intense. In saying that you will need to provide the lizards with some source of UVB to maintain them in good health in an indoor enclosure. UVB should also be provided from overhead to prevent direct exposure to the lizard's eye.

    Basically they should be provided with a heat, light and UVB gradient as well as shelter sites so they can choose their preferred area at different intervals throughout the day.

    Ideally the UVB lamp should be over the basking area and pairing them together produces the best results..
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2018
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