BTS; where to find them?

Discussion in 'General Reptile Discussion' started by Great Dane, Sep 15, 2019.

  1. Great Dane

    Great Dane New Member

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    Hi all,
    As the weather starts warming up in Melbourne, I’d love to go searching(or ‘herping’ I believe the Americans call it) for some wild blue tongue lizards.

    I was just hoping anyone here would have any information in regards to hints & tips on finding them? Best time of day/common hiding places/weather.

    Note: I am not removing them from the wild nor touching them as I don’t have a permit, I’m doing this purely out of curiosity and the hopes of better educating myself on natural behaviour/habitat.

    Thanks!
     
  2. nuttylizardguy

    nuttylizardguy Active Member

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    Ask your neighbours , very likely some of them have resident wild BTs living in their garden , in their shed , under the house , or in the storm water pipes , they might let you visit to observe it.
     
  3. GBWhite

    GBWhite Well-Known Member

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    "Herping" is actually a pretty universal term regarding searching for reptiles.

    In regards to finding Bluetongues in the wild it depends on where you live. If your in suburbia there's probably minimal chance of neighbours having them in their yards and/or allowing some random person on their property. Your best chance would be to visit rural locations and search around dump sites or tips and even old sections of cemeteries. Looking through rubbish or debri on the side of roads or bush tracks can often turn up Bluetongues. Even so your chances of finding them wandering about are pretty remote if you're not familiar with a given area but they are often found under sheets of iron/colourbond roofing, old doors, car panels, stacks of timber, sleepers, etc during early mornings before they get a chance to warm up and get out and about for the day. Just remember to be aware that these are also common refuge spots for venomous snakes such as Tigers, Browns and Copperheads.

    Best of luck.
     
  4. -Adam-

    -Adam- Not so new Member

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    If you have a motorbike, and go for a ride in rural areas. See plenty of them basking or crossing the road on mild sunny mornings. Not only do you get to go herping, you get to go motorbike riding too - double win. :)

    Otherwise, a walk through scrub lands - especially dry swamp areas will probably have you coming across plenty of them if you enjoy hiking.
     
  5. Great Dane

    Great Dane New Member

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    Thanks for your reply! I live in a semi rural place (I’m on 10 acres) so the chance of finding a blue tongue isn’t 0 but it also isn’t high as we have trucks coming in and out of the property Daily. I am going up to jindabyne(NSW) in December/January to go fishing & lizard hunting, so I hope to have luck there! I’ll make sure to wear some heavy cotton drill pants & high boots for snakes! Thank you
    --- Automatic Post Merged, Sep 20, 2019, Original Post Date: Sep 20, 2019 ---
    Unfortunately I’m not too fond on motorbikes, but mountain biking & hiking I’m keen on! I live near a good rural section of river so maybe in the next few months I’ll take a stroll along(and off) the paths there. Thanks!
     

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