Buying a snake

Discussion in 'Australian Snakes' started by dylanbygrave112, Mar 26, 2013.

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  1. dylanbygrave112

    dylanbygrave112 New Member

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    Hey everybody, I'm looking to get a snake in the near future. I would greatly appreciate some info for caring for a snake (enclosure setup, feeding requirements, and especially temperaments). [​IMG] the attached pic will be its enclosure :)

    Cheers!
    Dylan.
     
  2. harlemrain

    harlemrain Well-Known Member

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    You can find lots of info on here about all kinds of snake :) depends on personal preference, give us an idea of what you'd like in a python and we'll make some suggestions :) then we can get into what that species requires.

    Welcom to APS :)
     
  3. sharky

    sharky Very Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to APS! Will that be its home for life? If so can you please give us the dimensions so we can tell you what breed can live in there its whole life (if any)

    There are so many to choose from! Browse around and enjoy! :D
     
  4. dylanbygrave112

    dylanbygrave112 New Member

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    Thanks for getting back to me! :), the tank would be its home for life and its 120cm high, 90cm wide and 60cm deep. I love the looks of the jungle python as its got some nice colours but have heard they can get snappy, so I love something with some cool colours that has a good temperament. Also something that will grow to moderate length if that helps?
     
  5. Skeptic

    Skeptic Well-Known Member

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    That would be fine for a jungle. As adults they're not too snappy :) Luckily you're getting into reptiles at just the right time. All the information you will EVER need to know about keeping reptiles has just been released by the NSW government! The guys there know a hell of a lot more than anyone on this forum. Good luck :)
     
  6. SarahScales

    SarahScales Well-Known Member

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    I doubt the government would know as much as the people here that have been breeding snakes for longer than I have been alive...

    Regardless, Jungle hatchies are very snappy but very beautiful. The bites don't hurt at all anyway!
     
  7. Skeptic

    Skeptic Well-Known Member

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    Sorry, sometimes sarcasm is hard to get across through a keyboard :)
     
  8. ronhalling

    ronhalling Subscriber Subscriber

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    I think Skeptic's comment on the Gov was pretty well tongue in cheek, but i do beleive a jungle would be more suited to that enclosure, i think with all snakes handling or lack thereof determines their personality................................................Ron
     
  9. PieBald

    PieBald Well-Known Member

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    I wouldnt put a jugle hatchy in that enclosure, way to big IMO
     
  10. dylanbygrave112

    dylanbygrave112 New Member

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    Thanks for the advice everyone, so if I were to get a jungle python and handle it everyday I could get it out of the "snappy behaviour" quite easily? And what problems will I come across with having a jungle python in such a large enclosure? As it will be my 1st snake I wanna be sure I do it right! Cheers!
     
  11. The_Geeza

    The_Geeza Suspended Banned

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    Darwin or jungle would do fine in that enclosure......Most hatchies bite ...its how u approach them that makes all the difference.............use a hook and always come with your hand from below and i bet the snake dont bite....most people just grab it from above and wonder y a defensless hatchie bites?????
     
  12. SarahScales

    SarahScales Well-Known Member

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    My baby jungle is about 18 months now and she hasn't bitten for roughly the last 3 of those. The thing to get used to, is they are all talk. They will wind up to strike, the key is not to hesitate and just pick them up quickly anyway. The shock of you not being afraid of them seems to work wonders. Even still, the bites are no worse than grazes and it's really only when you are getting them out. Just make sure you keep him/her in a click clack for the first few months to make sure you don't get a cage defensive one.
     
  13. Schnecke

    Schnecke Well-Known Member

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    Hi, welcome to APS! When I was looking for a python, I joined this forum thinking id get a diamond python (not even knowing what a jungle python was to tell you the truth!) then I fell in love with them. I wanted an arboreal style enclosure so wanted a snake that suited that.

    I read aaaaaaaalllll about snappy jungles and still continued to look, until I found a breeder (a member of this forum) who had success with well tempered clutches. I picked my baby Moose from a tiny photo and some advice from the breeder and I couldn't be happier. Moose turned 2 in January and only bit me on the day I got him home.

    i agree with the above comment that it is about how you approach them. I find Jungles more "touchy" and "flighty" than other snakes, so as long as you are calm, patient and try hard not to startle them, you can have a non-snappy hatchy most of the time (I only say "most"
    of the time, as snake reactions are never going to be an exact science.

    i think the main thing to realise is that snakes can only react to what is in front of them. If you rush and startle them, their reaction is going to be much more defensive than if you are calm, thoughtful, non-threatening and patient.

    if you love the look of a jungle,
    go for it! :)
     
  14. Rob8290

    Rob8290 Guest

    I would say go for it! I have a black and gold jungle hatchie and he was only snappy for the first few weeks of handling and has since settled right down. He is now 5 months old and a gem to handle. Even when they bite you hardly feel a thing, a kittens bite hurts more. Even as they get older they hardly hurt. Just don't forget to leave it alone other then changing water and cleaning for 1-2 weeks after purchasing it. If you get a hatchie there is a great guide to building a "click-clack" (converted plastic container) in the DIY section of this forum. They can live in a click clack for the first months of their lives.
     
  15. dylanbygrave112

    dylanbygrave112 New Member

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    Thanks for the advice everyone greatly appreciated! One last question is, as I'm hearing alot about click clacks is it necessary to keep a hatchie in one or can I put it straight into a large enclosure? And if I can put it into the large enclosure how much trouble would a hatchie have making its way to the basking spots (as you can see in the above picture that I have 2 basking spots and 2 uv bulbs that are at the top of the enclosure)
     
  16. Zeusy

    Zeusy Active Member

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    I got a jungle as my first snake and he's awesome.

    I have found that after he settled into his click clack, i used a hook to get him out and allowed him to slither onto my hand/arm. At first it took him ages before he would. Every time he got close, he'd smell me and pull away but eventually he climbed on. I also held my other hand calmly near him and he would go onto one arm or the other. After about 4 weeks now, he goes climbs straight on and explores. He only every nipped me once and it was nothing. He slithered between my ring and pinky finger and i must have closed them slightly and he nipped my pinky. I didnt even realise until he had already let go as i couldn't see his head and no blood, no marks, no pain.

    I use a click clack as huge spaces will stress them and make them more prone to giving you a nip. If they feel nice and secure and safe, you will have less trouble with biting IMO. Follow all of the above advice and once you set everything up, test all your temps etc for a day or two or even more if you can before putting your snake in there. I would still use a lick clack and maybe put it inside the enclosure so he gets used to the surroundings but still feels secure in the click clack. A 7L Sistema container is only $10 or so from woolies. I have about 32-34 degrees on the floor in the warm end (basking spot), about 29-30 degrees ambient at the warm end and the cold end ranges depending on the ambient temp outside but with A/C, i try to keep it at 24-26 degrees which gives a good temp gradient.

    Good Luck and enjoy the experience.
     
  17. dylanbygrave112

    dylanbygrave112 New Member

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    Ok sweet! Getting heaps of great advice :) ok so the plan will be jungle python, kept I'm a click clack for a month or 2 (I will keep the click clack in the snakes enclosure underneath the basking bulb but ensuing I monitor both hot and cold ends before snake is purchased). What will the hatchie eat at this size living in a click clack and how often? I won't attempt to pick up the hatchie for a week or 2 after purchase to let it settle in its new environment, when I do I will use the hook to pick it up and always come from underneath with my hands. When I remove it from the click clack I again will give it time to settle in its permanent environment before handling . How does this sound, Am I on the right track?
     
  18. Sezzzzzzzzz

    Sezzzzzzzzz Very Well-Known Member

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    how will you maintain a heat gradient this way? IMO you'd be much better off with a heat mat or heat cord than doing it this way.
     
  19. dylanbygrave112

    dylanbygrave112 New Member

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    Yeah I was just thinking that, heat pad would be much easier and smarter way to go.
     
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