Cairns people

Discussion in 'Australian Snakes' started by Waterrat, Apr 20, 2012.

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  1. Waterrat

    Waterrat Almost Legendary

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    The Cape York Herpetological Society is meeting today at the Cairns City Library at 7pm.

    Guest speaker: Greg Miles
    Topic: "The conservation crisis in northern Australia"
     
  2. Bushman

    Bushman Very Well-Known Member

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    This will undoubtedly be an informative, interesting and insightful talk and a very enjoyable evening.
     
  3. Waterrat

    Waterrat Almost Legendary

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    It was. Greg never fails to deliver powerful message. Pity there was no one there from DERM.
     
  4. Renenet

    Renenet Very Well-Known Member

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    Greg's ideas make so much sense. With 60,000 licensed private wildlife keepers in Australia, why not harness them for conservation purposes? I bet that number would rise if our cute mammals were more available - I personally would take a quoll over a cat - and I bet quite a few of them would be interested in breeding endangered species. We'd get species-specific breeding programs all across the country, endangered species would be, by default, kept in several different locations, guarding against catastrophe - and the government doesn't have to spend a cent. The breeders are reimbursed by being able to sell the offspring. It's not ideal, but better than the current situation.

    Has it been done elsewhere in the world? What, as private wildlife keepers, can we do to encourage the government to try this idea out? I found myself wanting to bang my head against the nearest hard surface at Greg's description of his dealings with government departments. Most telling, I found, was the fact that he felt it necessary to submit a proposal to two different government branches.

    On a side note, I had no idea there were so many privately managed conservation areas in Australia. (There might be more places to find work after uni than I thought. :D) I always thought it was a great idea and wanted to start one, but lacked the necessary funds. If these places are indeed being managed well, it gives me hope.
     
  5. waruikazi

    waruikazi Legendary

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    But Renet, it is happening!!! All sneaky like, without the government really realising it yet but it is happening and starting to happen with more species. And alot of it is happening because of Greg and his ideas.

    Think about Gavin Bedford's latest project, where there has been some significant success in recently. Then the RSP's, pygmy crocs, broad headed snakes, top end mulgas and pretty well all the top end monitors. They are all in captivity and the numbers are increasing (slowly in some cases). There are a host of bird species in captivity that are endangered or threatened and i'm sure there are fish too!

    So there is hope, it's just that the govt has some backward ideas about why and what is done with some species that we would like to collect and keep as pets.
     
  6. Waterrat

    Waterrat Almost Legendary

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    True, but what we need to see is the willingness, enthusiasm and positive steps taken by the government agencies to engage us, conservation-minded breeders in the bigger role to preserve and propagate endangered species. It will still take some time to change the attitude of some of the bureaucrats, particularly in WA and NSW. It's great to see the NT government leaning towards our objectives and if successful, the other states will start to realise the positive aspects of such changes. Or as Greg said "they will see that the sky didn't fall in NT".
     
  7. waruikazi

    waruikazi Legendary

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    It can't fall in any further than it has under their watch at least!

    I agree Michael, the govt needs to be more proactive and have a willingness to try new things.

    I also think that keepers and herpers like ourselves should try and think outside the box a little when it comes to conservation.
     
  8. richardsc

    richardsc Very Well-Known Member

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    the prob is said goverment agencies,they prefer to make it look like they are doing all the good there,or the goverment funded zoos,with some of these species,they would want to make there minds up faster as if they wait to long might not get the chance

    michael,does the capeyork herp society still put out a publication
     
  9. Waterrat

    Waterrat Almost Legendary

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    Yes, in a form of newsletter containing articles and news.
     
  10. richardsc

    richardsc Very Well-Known Member

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    thanks for that
     
  11. Bushman

    Bushman Very Well-Known Member

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    I really wish that I was able to go to this meet.
    This is an interesting discussion guys, with many good points, well worth considering and taking further.
    Good post Renenet!
    Your questions deserve answers...
    I'll try and find some successful international projects that we can cite in a proposal to the government.
    What did Greg suggest as an action plan or way forward from here?
     
  12. waruikazi

    waruikazi Legendary

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    You don't need to look international for these stories. The Gouldian finch is a brilliant example.

     
  13. dihsmaj

    dihsmaj Very Well-Known Member

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    wait, pygmy crocs are in the hobby?
     
  14. waruikazi

    waruikazi Legendary

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    Sure are. Not in very big numbers and it will be a long time before they are being bred but they are here.
     
  15. Waterrat

    Waterrat Almost Legendary

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    The Lake Echam rainbow fish is another example.

    Estuarine crocodiles - once on the brink of extinction, listed on appendix I of CITES - now we have thriving wild populations with a thriving crocodile industry (skins, meat, artifacts) along the side. The pioneers of crocodile farming are the heroes (not the governments), they put a price on crocodiles as valuable units and results is a shiny example what private enterprise can do in conservation.
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2012
  16. Bushman

    Bushman Very Well-Known Member

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    Good one Gordo! That's a great example.
    Save the Gouldian Fund -About the Fund
    Gouldian Finch (Erythrura gouldiae) Reintroduction Programme


    More great examples. Thanks Michael.
    Greg and yourself should both be commended on your success in breeding vulnerable species i.e the Pig-nosed Turtle and native GTP respectively. Thanks to both of you, these previously poorly understood and rarely bred animals are now secure in captivity. Well done!
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2012
  17. Waterrat

    Waterrat Almost Legendary

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    ..... and of course John Weigel's Rough-scaled python success. Who knows what will happen to the wild population once the toads establish themselves.
     
  18. -Katana-

    -Katana- Well-Known Member

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    I was wondering if the Woma python would be another example? It's listed as endangered here in Queensland and yet it is so popular within the hobby.
     
  19. Waterrat

    Waterrat Almost Legendary

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    To say that Woma is endangered in Queensland is like saying the same about tiger snake and many other species. They have limited distribution in Qld but that doesn't mean their population (species) is threatened.
    Captive populations of endangered species can only be regarded as a conservation strategy for species with very limited distribution, e.g. RSP, GTP, N. galgajuga, etc., where any adverse impact on the isolated habitat would be detrimental to the species' existence. The Oenpelli python is an exception. That's not the case with Woma and other species with wide (interstate) distribution.
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2012
  20. waruikazi

    waruikazi Legendary

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    What are you thinking of proposing? Do you have a species in mind?

    How about this little fella? Lucasium occultum.

    Lucasium occultum — Yellow-snouted Gecko
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2012
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