Can you tell me what this snake is please?

Discussion in 'Reptile and Amphibian Identification' started by babba007, Oct 12, 2013.

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  1. babba007

    babba007 Well-Known Member

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    I'm not sure if this is a green tree snake or yellow faced whip snake. Please educate me!! Thanks
     

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  2. Vixen

    Vixen Very Well-Known Member

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    Tree snake. :p
     
  3. baker

    baker Well-Known Member

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    Common tree snake/Green tree snake.
    Cheers Cameron
     
  4. babba007

    babba007 Well-Known Member

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    Thank you!

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    Is it completely harmless?
     
  5. baker

    baker Well-Known Member

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    Completely harmless
    Cheers Cameron
     
  6. babba007

    babba007 Well-Known Member

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    He's out basking in the sun now, and I can clearly see the blue speckles on his back. The kids and I watched him eat a little skink. Pretty cool
     
  7. CamdeJong

    CamdeJong Well-Known Member

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    Just to help with your ID confusion yellow-faced whipsnakes are not arboreal to the extent in the picture, they have distinct teardrops beneath their eyes and are usually greenish-yellow with some amount of fading to grey, and some red shading on the posterior dorsum (top of the body near the front). They are more robust than common tree snakes and rarely get above 1m long.
     
  8. eipper

    eipper Very Well-Known Member APS Veteran

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    That would be anterior dorsum Cam. Posterior is towards the caudal end
     
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