Caramel phase ?

Discussion in 'Australian Snakes' started by Variety, Oct 6, 2012.

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  1. Variety

    Variety Well-Known Member

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    Hey guys just wondering what actually causes a python to have a caramel phase ? More specifically a central carpet python.
    Purchases a 15 month old female and would love to know :p

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. dannydee

    dannydee Well-Known Member

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    The caramel trait is a co-dominant gene found within some coastals. I'm pretty sure it doesn't occur in bredli. Could you post a picture?
     
  3. Variety

    Variety Well-Known Member

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    Haha reading your comment made me very confused, then i realised i had said central carpet not coastal. Been looking through an Australian Python book all day today so theres alot of python words floating around my head haha, my apologies. Could you please explain what a co-dominant gene is ? Also im going to assume that you asked for a photo incase i had found a new phase of bredli :p But here she is anyway;

    694.jpg

    View attachment 267016

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    Also do you kno why it dos'nt apear in bredls ? Just curious :p
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2012
  4. Dippy

    Dippy Active Member

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    Possibly because Bredli's are a red - redish brown color anyway and this would make the caramel trait next to invisible anyway? just a thought =)
     
  5. Variety

    Variety Well-Known Member

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    Fair call .. lol

    Could anyone please explain what a co-dominant gene is
     
  6. saximus

    saximus Almost Legendary

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    There are basically three types of heritability with single gene mutations. Dominant, recessive and co-dominant. Co-dominant means a trait that produces a visual difference in heterozygous animals. Jags are one of the more famous examples of co-dominant mutation. With a lot of co-dom mutations there is also what is known as a "super" form. This is the name for animals that are homozygous for the trait. It is usually quite different to the het version. With Jags, the super form is leucistic. I'm not sure what the super form of caramels is though.
     
  7. Variety

    Variety Well-Known Member

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    Ok thanks, sax. Ill look into it and see if i can find a gene explanation for dummys anywhere haha
     
  8. GeckoJosh

    GeckoJosh Almost Legendary

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    Super Caramel
     
  9. saximus

    saximus Almost Legendary

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  10. Variety

    Variety Well-Known Member

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  11. saximus

    saximus Almost Legendary

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    Yeah they determine what it looks like completely. Recessive mutations require both parents to carry the genes. Codom and dominant mutations only require one parent to carry it
     
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