Childrens python- not eating???

Discussion in 'Herp Help' started by Magee, Jun 4, 2018.

  1. Magee

    Magee Not so new Member

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    Hi,
    I know this is a common one, but I also feel like it's very out of character.
    I've got a children's, 8 years old, female (have had since yearling). She ate a weaner rat at the end of Feb, and an adult mouse mid April. Nothing between or since- has rejected offers. Very active around her enclosure, shed 10 days ago but messy. Still looking very grey even after shedding.
    She's very tame, almost completely head trained, and happy around kids etc.
    But she struck at me for the first time in 7 years today, unprovoked.

    Any ideas what might be going on? Is this normal stuff?

    Thanks,
    M
     
  2. Bl69aze

    Bl69aze Very Well-Known Member

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    Could be that it’s come to
    Winter and doesn’t want to be disturbed.

    What’s her hotspot temps?
    Any set up pics or snek pics?
     
  3. Magee

    Magee Not so new Member

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    Will grab pics now. THermostat setup witth ceramic heat lamp
     
  4. Bl69aze

    Bl69aze Very Well-Known Member

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    Need numbers, thermostat could be set to one thing, but unless you have a tempgun, it could be different to what you set

    I learned this a few days ago, thought my spot was 34~ but it was really 31
     
  5. Magee

    Magee Not so new Member

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    Ceramic lamp set to 28*C.

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    --- Automatic Post Merged, Jun 4, 2018, Original Post Date: Jun 4, 2018 ---
    Coldest spot of cage at 22, hottest at 28.
     
  6. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    I'd be getting the hottest spot up to 34°.
     
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  7. Kirk1701

    Kirk1701 Active Member

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    Sounds like a temp issue, my spotted went through this a few weeks ago. Now his hot spot is holding steady at 34 and he ate like a champ. I've also noticed he seems to be a bit more placid since I got his new heat set up (could be because he is getting bigger).
     
  8. Bluetongue1

    Bluetongue1 APS Veteran APS Veteran

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    There have been a couple more posts since I wrote this – fell asleep last night before posting it. So it repeats some of what has been said.

    I assume you have not altered the heating in the last year plus. While you may get away with the current arrangements, your warm end is on the low side. A basking spot between 33 and 36 is desirable, which should then provide an ambient range of about 30 to low 20’s.

    It may not be a temperature issue. So if you do make adjustments to the temperature and there is no change, don’t worry. Have a read of the following short thread to put your mind at ease: https://www.aussiepythons.com/forum/threads/11-yo-stimson-not-eating.222521/

    The shape the cabinet and the ventilation at the top makes it difficult to take full advantage of the heat from the lamp. What I would suggest is an elevated basking platform placed on top of the exiting wood shelf. A good way to do this that allows the snake to choose its desired position, is to use a stack like they do with monitors. It would not be hard to make and would certainly help. Following is a photo of a simple wooden stack to give you the idea. A while back I designed a simple “snake stack” for a mate to try with his stimmies. However he ended up swapping them for frilled-necks and so didn’t do it. I can draw it up and post it here if you are interested.
    upload_2018-6-5_15-47-3.png

    From what I can see, the hides provided are far too big and would not allow the snake to effectively retain heat after basking. They really need to be able to coil up in a tight space, where they can reduce air flow around them to retain heat.

    Secondly, to allow the snake to make good use of branches, they are best if significantly thicker than the snake and on a maximum of about 45 degrees, with some also being horizontal. You can use several bit of wood in a zig zag pattern to utilise the height of the cage. They can be screwed or tied together to hold them firmly in place. Cable ties are excellent for this.
     

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