Cone snails

Discussion in 'Other Animals and Invertebrate' started by Harimoni Proudswift, Apr 24, 2018.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Harimoni Proudswift

    Harimoni Proudswift Not so new Member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2018
    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    30
    Gender:
    Female
    Cone snails are one of my favourite groups of animals. They're molluscs that can be found in all tropical and sub-tropical waters, usually on coral reefs. They get their name from their beautifully-pattern cone-shaped shells. However, handling live specimens is not recommended as they're highly venomous, with the sting of some species capable of killing a human within a few hours if left untreated.

    I have a collection of seven Cone snail shells.
     
    Foozil and Flaviemys purvisi like this.
  2. Foozil

    Foozil Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2017
    Messages:
    718
    Likes Received:
    529
    Gender:
    Male
    Awesome. Any pics?

    I have a few fossil cone snail shells from Melbourne.
     
  3. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2017
    Messages:
    3,033
    Likes Received:
    2,400
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    QLD
    Yeah I know the ones... Seen a David Attenborough documentary on them years ago. Cool as. The most dangerous aquatic animals I own are a couple of freshwater Bullrout. :p
     
  4. vampstorso

    vampstorso Very Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2011
    Messages:
    1,777
    Likes Received:
    395
    Location:
    Australia
    Oh that's awesome.
    I was about to buy some a few years ago when I then decided to stop with the aquiarums.
    Would love a thread on your bullrout.
     
  5. Harimoni Proudswift

    Harimoni Proudswift Not so new Member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2018
    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    30
    Gender:
    Female
    I don't own any live Cone snails, just the shells. Besides, I don't think it's legal to own them since they're venomous. The shells I have in my collection belong to the Striated cone, the Marbled cone, the Vexillum cone, the Imperial cone, the Cloth of Gold cone, the Leopard cone and the Geography cone, which is thought to be the most venomous species. Back in the mid-1930s, on Queensland's Hayman Island, a young man picked up a live Geography cone and was stung on the hand. He died five hours later. Apparently, the Queensland Museum has the actual specimen responsible for this fatality.
     
    Flaviemys purvisi likes this.
  6. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2017
    Messages:
    3,033
    Likes Received:
    2,400
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    QLD
    Bullrout literally do nothing at all... sit in a corner and move their eyes... mouth partially open... gills barely moving... totally camo. When feeder fish are dropped in the tank, they explode into action.

    Years ago just above Belgrave Falls on the Macleay river, whilst diving for turtles... I inadvertently put my left hand palm down on a Bullrout about the size of a golf ball. It was sheer AGONY. The only way I can describe the pain is... imagine striking a match... and then dropping it in the palm of your hand and letting it burn out. God damn!
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page