Considering Getting a Snake for Autistic Sister

Discussion in 'Australian Snakes' started by GoldenGaytime404, Apr 15, 2019.

  1. GoldenGaytime404

    GoldenGaytime404 New Member

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    So my little sister has Asperger's Syndrome (a form of autism) and recently we went to a zoo and one of the keepers was doing a talk and had some slithery assistants. She let some of the kids pet the python she was holding, including my sister, who liked the smooth feeling of its scales. I've been doing a ton of research lately about getting one for her but I can't decide which species to get. I would be the snake's primary carer of course (I'm doing an Animal Studies course at TAFE). Any insight would be super helpful.
     
  2. Sdaji

    Sdaji Almost Legendary

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    Why do you say 'of course'? Many people with Asperger's keep snakes. One of the largest keepers of snakes in Australia, someone well known (I won't name him) has Asperger's.

    Anyway, the best species will depend on what she likes. Definitely one of the pythons. The most common and probably the best options are Carpet Pythons, Antaresia (all of the species are similar to keep and handle etc) and Womas. Perhaps worth mentioning are Water Pythons, Black-headed Pythons and if you want something really big, Olive Pythons.

    Carpet Pythons are good if you want a large snake (there are several types which do vary a bit in multiple ways including how the handle, how keenly they feed, and some differences in how they're best kept, and adult size), Antaresia are good if you want a small snake (they won't get much larger than a metre), and you can look into the others. If she's really keen on one of the others that's great and you can go for it, but typically a Carpet or Antaresia will be best as a first snake.
     
  3. LittleButterfly

    LittleButterfly Not so new Member

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    They may have said of course because their sister is too young to own the snake by herself
    --- Automatic Post Merged, Apr 15, 2019, Original Post Date: Apr 15, 2019 ---
    I think also maybe an anterasia may be a better option compared to a carpet because of their tempurament
     
  4. Sdaji

    Sdaji Almost Legendary

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    It's certainly a possibility :) Just wondering what the reason was because it may change the recommendation and other than having Asperger's no reason was given.
     
  5. LittleButterfly

    LittleButterfly Not so new Member

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    Sometimes it just doesn't cross peoples minds to put extra details at first
     
  6. cagey

    cagey Subscriber Subscriber

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    My most chiiled and active snake is my woma. At the end ot the day it will be which one she is most interested in and finding a breeder.
     
  7. Sdaji

    Sdaji Almost Legendary

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    Right, which is why I asked :)
     
  8. ColourBombReptiles

    ColourBombReptiles Not so new Member

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    Well, I happen to have so myself Aspergers and I’m a girl and I have a scaly friend! I recommend a carpet python :p
     
  9. GoldenGaytime404

    GoldenGaytime404 New Member

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    My sister is ten years old right now so my parents don't think she should have full responsibility, especially with feeding (they don't want her getting bitten). I'll let her have more responsibility as she gets older and more experienced.
    --- Automatic Post Merged, Apr 15, 2019, Original Post Date: Apr 15, 2019 ---
    I've been looking into Antaresias and Woma Pythons fairly extensively and I'm leaning toward the latter, since they're on the smaller side.
     
  10. Sdaji

    Sdaji Almost Legendary

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    Antaresia are all smaller than Womas, but if you want a Woma they're pretty cool snakes too :) If you can, have a play with both and watch them feed. They're all great snakes, but Womas are very different from Antaresia and you might have a strong personal preference for one or the other.

    Best of luck :)
     
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  11. nick_75

    nick_75 Active Member

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    A very close friend's ten year old son has autism, he has been fascinated with my snakes his whole life. He got his own children's python two years ago (on his parents licence). He was engaged regarding the species and was taken to see all of the different breeders to choose the individual. Don't leave your sister out of the whole process and present her with a snake and say "here, this is yours". Include her in the research, try and get a good sense of her level of interest and what her preference is.

    All of the options above are great, do the research and make a good decision together. Have you looked at much literature? There are many great books out there for first time keepers.
    --- Automatic Post Merged, Apr 16, 2019, Original Post Date: Apr 16, 2019 ---
    I think your parents a being over protective, a snake bite from a small python is not a harrowing experience. Being bitten is something reptile owners have to deal with. My friend's boy mentioned above has full responsibility of his python (his parents monitor him feeding and cleaning). He has been bitten, it happens. It has not discouraged him in the slightest. Letting your sister care for the animal (with supervision) may ensure that she takes a keener interest and views the animal as her's.
     
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  12. GoldenGaytime404

    GoldenGaytime404 New Member

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    I've been doing most of my research online since my parents always have the car and I can't go to the local library, but I will when I get the chance. I've been including her as much as I can, but she seems more interested in looking at the pictures of the snakes than the words lol.
     
  13. Abstractivity

    Abstractivity Not so new Member

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    Doesn't sound like you're rushing into this which is good, but your sister may not be all that interested in a few years time. So make sure she is really invested. Handling is the best thing she can do to build her confidence (has she a handled a snake before or just touched?). Imo when you decide on a species you should go through a few options with the breeder and see which individuals handle the best (making sure they're all established feeders and shedders, most reputable breeders will keep a feeding card wish sheds on them) . Then you can choose which you think will manifest the best colours/patterns (if you are concerned about colour/pattern that is).
     
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  14. nick_75

    nick_75 Active Member

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    I'm not sure if any of the books you should read would be available at your local library. There used to be a thread on this site titled "Recommended Reading", use the search function to find it and look at the list. If you can't find the thread, look online for a copy of 'Keeping and Breeding Australian Pythons' by Mike Swan. The book gives a great overview of all Australian python species and will help you make a decision based on size, housing requirements and potential temperament. The book is an essential start for any new keeper.

    Most states have reptile husbandry guidelines that you should look up as well.
     

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