Container for death adders.

Discussion in 'Australian Snakes' started by Damo1, Nov 11, 2017.

  1. Damo1

    Damo1 Not so new Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2017
    Messages:
    76
    Likes Received:
    16
    Gender:
    Male
    looking at easy housing options for my first ven which I want to get after next year. I know a lot of people vote against them as a first but there is just something about them. I plan on doing a ven handling course. But I was thinking of using this container. Would this suffice for its life time. I'll probably do a glass fronted enclosure as I get more experience but until then what do you think.

    IMG_2570.PNG
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 11, 2017
  2. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2017
    Messages:
    1,811
    Likes Received:
    1,174
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    QLD
    Yeah that'd be alright if you plan on locking it inside a steel gun safe which is then bolted inside a shipping container which is then buried inside a subterranean vault with 3ft thick concrete walls... LOL
    That's just my parenting speaking... I've got 2 young daughters. No way I'd have a plastic tub with click-clack locks restraining a death adder. LOL
     
  3. Bl69aze

    Bl69aze Very Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2017
    Messages:
    1,339
    Likes Received:
    807
    Gender:
    Male
    Venomous snakes are the last thing you want to cheap out on.

    You will need a key lock. You will probably need a proper enclosure. I can’t remember what it was but there was a dude who used a holding bin and found a fang penetrating the sides.
     
  4. Yellowtail

    Yellowtail Subscriber Subscriber

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2017
    Messages:
    680
    Likes Received:
    1,780
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Gold Coast, Qld
    A adult Death Adder in that 50L tub will be able to strike from laying motionless to any point on the perimeter faster than you can blink. Only thing more dangerous will be a glass door at face level.
     
  5. saximus

    saximus Almost Legendary

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2009
    Messages:
    5,764
    Likes Received:
    124
    Location:
    Windsor, NSW
    I don't really understand this comment? Are you suggesting they shouldn't buy it because Adders strike quickly?
    Elapid ownership 101:
    - Don't reach a hand into an enclosure. Ever.
    - Don't stand with your face directly in above/front of an enclosure you're about to open.

    That tub looks fine to me. It's high walled and they aren't great climbers so with the extra click locks they wouldn't be strong enough to push on the lid at all, let alone with enough strength to force it. Depending what state you're in, if the enclosure has to be key lockable, that adds difficulty though.
     
    Wizzer and GBWhite like this.
  6. Scutellatus

    Scutellatus Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2017
    Messages:
    916
    Likes Received:
    1,106
    Gender:
    Male
    Keeping venomous snakes is not something to do on the cheap. Buy proper enclosures with proper locks.
     
    Yellowtail and Flaviemys purvisi like this.
  7. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2017
    Messages:
    1,811
    Likes Received:
    1,174
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    QLD
    I agree entirely, no second chances with that one... The only way I'd be keeping a death adder in that tub is if it were as described in my original post.
     
  8. Yellowtail

    Yellowtail Subscriber Subscriber

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2017
    Messages:
    680
    Likes Received:
    1,780
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Gold Coast, Qld
    My intention was to bluntly point out to Damo1 who admitted that he had no experience with Elapids let alone Adders that they were not to be taken lightly and safe proper housing is very important. I don't know what state he is in but I kept elapids in all sorts of things when it was totally unregulated and learned by experience and in hindsight a lot of luck. I would not consider keeping them today without the best and safest enclosures available with suitable areas or hides to isolate them in when required.
     
  9. saximus

    saximus Almost Legendary

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2009
    Messages:
    5,764
    Likes Received:
    124
    Location:
    Windsor, NSW
    That makes sense, thanks for the clarification.

    I still disagree with the idea that safe and cheap are mutually exclusive concepts but everyone has their own ideology so I don't imagine this forum discussion is going to change anyone's mind.
     
  10. Scutellatus

    Scutellatus Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2017
    Messages:
    916
    Likes Received:
    1,106
    Gender:
    Male
    Safe and cheap means every tom, dick and harry may think that it is a good idea to get a license and tub and away they go. Having to spend money on a decent enclosure and the cost of setting up an escape proof room will hopefully deter the heros that want it on impulse because it is cool.
     
    Flaviemys purvisi likes this.
  11. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2017
    Messages:
    1,811
    Likes Received:
    1,174
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    QLD
    There's nothing to be gained from keeping a death adder in a plasic tub except a ticket to the last roundup and a skyhigh life insurance premium.
     
  12. Scutellatus

    Scutellatus Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2017
    Messages:
    916
    Likes Received:
    1,106
    Gender:
    Male
    For an experienced keeper it would not be so much of a problem. But as a first time keeper looking at keeping one of the more unpredictable elapids I think it is asking for trouble.
     
    Yellowtail and Flaviemys purvisi like this.
  13. Yellowtail

    Yellowtail Subscriber Subscriber

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2017
    Messages:
    680
    Likes Received:
    1,780
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Gold Coast, Qld
    Yeah well I have caught wild ones by hand and put them in an impromptu bag made out of my t shirt and taken them home on a bike but we are now in an era when forums like this and lots of books, courses etc are available with information on proper enclosures and procedures. Damo1 may be better off starting with a less dangerous elapid and gaining a bit of experience.
     
  14. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2017
    Messages:
    1,811
    Likes Received:
    1,174
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    QLD
    Damn! I read your posts and seriously build a mental image of you as Jack Palance from city slickers. Lol... I mean that as a compliment! "It's a death adder, I'll just put it in my shirt."
    images-10.jpg
    I take my hat off to You.
     
  15. Yellowtail

    Yellowtail Subscriber Subscriber

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2017
    Messages:
    680
    Likes Received:
    1,780
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Gold Coast, Qld
    One of these would be a good starter, this one is almost tame and spends a lot of time under my wheely bin.
    IMG_0967.jpg
     
    Foozil, Stompsy, Snapped and 3 others like this.
  16. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2017
    Messages:
    1,811
    Likes Received:
    1,174
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    QLD
    I has a yearling many years ago as a kid. Beauiful species.
     
  17. GBWhite

    GBWhite Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2013
    Messages:
    762
    Likes Received:
    1,035
    Ditto and think it was the norm years ago. Still pick up Adders, Stephens Bandeds and Clarence River Snakes pretty regularly around here either on the roads or ones that show up in people's yards. I'm 62 and except for Adders I still tail them but unlike years ago have the benefit of using a hook and hoop bag for Adders these days. I also agree that Damo1 would be far better off with a RRB. But, in saying that, I have to admit that I have previously kept Adders (without doubt one of my favourite snakes) and Tigers and a few other dangerous vens including Clarence River Snakes and Coastal and Inland Tias in secured tubs without any issues. Most of my current vens are kept in locked enclosures but I've still got a Collets, Spotted Black and a couple of RBB's housed in secured tubs with all my current vens enclosed in a locked room. Not a problem for someone with experience but not something I'd recommend to someone just getting into vens.
     
    Scutellatus, saximus and Yellowtail like this.
  18. Damo1

    Damo1 Not so new Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2017
    Messages:
    76
    Likes Received:
    16
    Gender:
    Male
    Thanks for the insight and varied opinions I wasn't trying to cheap out but was curious on easier enclosure types. I understand where everyone is coming from and probably will go a red bellied black or some other beginner ven. I've still got a year to organise and think about everything. And I agree that people that get vens to look aren't the sharpest tool in the shed. I've got pythons but they don't do it for me they are a bit boring imo. What do people think about copper heads as a beginner ven???

    * to look cool *
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 13, 2017
    ronhalling likes this.
  19. Wizzer

    Wizzer New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2017
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    1
    Gender:
    Male
    Tub will be sweet mate .. just dont put big vens in it iv had vens in tubs for over 13 years...
     
    Sdaji likes this.

Share This Page