Critically endangered blue-tailed skinks gifted own tropical island as part of recovery efforts

Discussion in 'Reptile News' started by cagey, Sep 9, 2019.

  1. cagey

    cagey Subscriber Subscriber

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  2. nuttylizardguy

    nuttylizardguy Active Member

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    Just saw this story.

    While I like the idea of rehabilitating them from "extinct in the wild" and releasing them on a remote Cocos Is , presumeably in their natural range , I have to question their choice of an island that's only 2m above high tide …. surely they could have found a more substantial island that wont be inundated with the first TC or tsusami , wiping out the colony in one hit.
     
  3. Sdaji

    Sdaji Almost Legendary

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    It's not in their natural range.

    Islands with completely vacant ecological niches are apparently in short supply. Who'd have guessed?

    If there were numerous large, isolated islands with vacant ecological niches all over the place we wouldn't have extinction issues, would we?

    A cyclone won't hurt them appreciably. A tsunami might. If you own a better island you can donate it but otherwise this is probably the best one available.
     
  4. nuttylizardguy

    nuttylizardguy Active Member

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    A Category 4 or 5 tropical cyclone produces a storm surge of up to 10m. That'll drown the entire colony.
     
  5. Sdaji

    Sdaji Almost Legendary

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    Yeah, I suppose if a massive cyclone hit the wrong area it's possible the population could be wiped out. But again, if you have a better island you're willing to donate, feel free. I don't know if anyone is claiming that this is a population which individually guarantees the permanent existence of the species, and if they're saying that they're obviously wrong. They're obviously just saying this is the only/best option they have for putting them somewhere outside captivity so they'll stick them there and see what happens. It's pretty difficult to find anywhere with a vacant ecological niche.
     

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