Dark room?

Discussion in 'Herp Help' started by Murphy, Nov 10, 2018 at 12:58 PM.

  1. Murphy

    Murphy New Member

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    I have a male children’s python which is somewhere between 22-24 months old. He lived in the tropics in Queensland until July when he came to live with us in north west nsw. It was right in the middle of a harsh winter where it was getting down to -10 at night. So I think coming from a place which is warm even in winter to an actually cold place might have been a shock for him. He has brumated basically this whole time. He has a glass reptile enclosure, he has a heat mat at 34 degrees with a hide on it, and another hide in the cold part of the tank and a heat lamp. However, he spends 100% of his time in the hide on the cold side. All day and all night. The heat mat is working fine.

    So I know that they don’t eat when brumating so I haven’t worried about trying to feed until mid October (about 3-4 weeks ago). It’s really heating up outside now it’s around 35-40 degrees outside the house in the daytime. Still no activity from him unless we actually pick him up, then he’ll move around. But otherwise he stays in his hide without moving.

    I’ve tried all sizes of mice, even pinkie rats. I thaw them out and warm them in warm water. I move them around with the feeding tweezers to simulate movement. Sometimes he’ll come up and sniff them then just goes back into his hide.
    ETA: last time he ate was mid April, 7 months ago with his previous owner in Queensland.

    So I have a couple of questions. How long do you jiggle the mice around on the tweezers for? I did it for about 10 minutes, is that not long enough?
    Also, his tank is in a room in the house which has no natural light. I turn the heat lamp on in the morning and off at sunset trying to simulate daytime. Does this matter to them? Should I move him into a room with a window so he can have natural light?

    Please help me, I’m starting to get very worried, and it’s becoming very expensive to keep throwing away the food.
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2018 at 1:09 PM
  2. Neil j

    Neil j Active Member

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    Not much help I live south tropical. But my little children’s yearling only just came back on the chew aye once the the night time temps rises. I was offering mice and it did take one in spring but has only just started feeding properly last two week. You can tell they are ready to eat.
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2018 at 1:50 PM
  3. Murphy

    Murphy New Member

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    Thanks so much Neil, yes people have told me that I’ll be able to tell when he’s hungry and he won’t starve. It’s still only about 12-17 degrees at night so maybe he’ll eat in a few weeks when it really heats up
     
  4. Neil j

    Neil j Active Member

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    No worries mate. 17 degrees see that’s still chilly. I notice mine is pacing round her tub now on prowl for a feed. She has also always been kept in rack systems. I position the hide over the heat but she will move the hide to suit her. You could try only using one hide being the one on the heat source. But one thing is for certain she will eat eventually. Night time 22c - 23c here
     
  5. dragonlover1

    dragonlover1 Subscriber Subscriber

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    I have a yearling childreni (plus other antaresia and morelia) who eats an adult mouse nearly every week. Do you check the temp of the food before feeding? it needs to be quite warm to simulate a live creature.Also what temps are you getting in your enclosure? you need about 26 cool end and 32 warm end, sometimes heat mats aren't enough, I only use them for juvies. I use heat lamps to keep my pythons active. A window with daylight will make no difference to your snakes activity.
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2018 at 8:08 PM
  6. Neil j

    Neil j Active Member

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    Yes my other two children’s fed on rats right through winter kept the same way but certain individuals may choose not to.
     

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