De-extinction

Discussion in 'Chit Chat' started by Imported_tuatara, Jan 2, 2018.

?
  1. Yes, and let them roam in the wild.

    1 vote(s)
    6.3%
  2. Yes, but under strict guidelines and in captivity.

    6 vote(s)
    37.5%
  3. No, not at all.

    9 vote(s)
    56.3%
  1. Scutellatus

    Scutellatus Well-Known Member

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    Check out the documentary called Ocean of Plastics. It is on Netflix.
    It is an absolute disgrace.
     
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  2. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    World wide, possibly, I dunno but in Australia males are grossly outnumbered... another reason why we should be allowed to have multipple wives. Lol stuff that, got enough dramas with 1. Lol
     
  3. Imported_tuatara

    Imported_tuatara Well-Known Member

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    move to iraq for that, be careful of the bombs tho ;)
     
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  4. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    Are yes, so letting nature take its course, the numbers would well and truly be reversed.
     
  5. Imported_tuatara

    Imported_tuatara Well-Known Member

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    it says partly, there's also genetics involved i'm pretty sure.
     
  6. Pauls_Pythons

    Pauls_Pythons Power Seller Power Seller

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    No they don't actually 'Cobber'. 1.06 males born per female in Australia. In line with global averages.
     
  7. GBWhite

    GBWhite Well-Known Member

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    World wide the ratio of male to female births (not including gendercide where female embryos and children are killed in preference to males) is 105 males to 100 females. Research indicates that it appears to be a result of more females embryos dying during pregnancy than male embryos. It's believed that this is an evolutionary trait developed over time as a means to eventually even out the ratio. Male infants suffer health complications more than females, males take more risks and on average suffer more health problems that lead to an early death more than females, males kill each other more than females and as a result it nearly balances things out to 101 males for every 100 females.

    In developed countries, including Australia the ratio of adult females is slightly higher than males. The imbalance is associated with more females surviving 60+ than males.
     
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  8. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    Interesting... the data I have says that there's more females in Australia and what George has said above is correct. I just read it on the ABS. FEMALES outnumber males in Australia, regardless of birth rates as an overall population. That's what I originally thought.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2018
  9. Scutellatus

    Scutellatus Well-Known Member

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    They may outnumber males as overall population but this can be attributed to males dying earlier as George stated.
     
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  10. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    Yeah that's right, I wasn't worried about the reasons behind the numbers just the numbers themselves... I heard years ago that women outnumber men in Australia. Now we know why.
     
  11. CrazyNut

    CrazyNut Well-Known Member

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    Nope. Not at all.

    If they are set in the wild they will reclaim nichies that were left empty with their extinction and probably just lead to more extinctions.

    If they are kept in captivity: Whats the point? It won't be for conservation, just another way to make money.

    Honsetly I think its much better idea to clone current species of extinct localities. This will provide a more variety in the gene pool. Theres a chance that these localities will die out again but if they don't it will be a great plus.
     
  12. dragonlover1

    dragonlover1 Subscriber Subscriber

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    the only way to do that is make humans extinct
    --- Automatic Post Merged, Jan 3, 2018, Original Post Date: Jan 3, 2018 ---
    I am 1 of 4 boys,no sisters,I have 2 sons & 1 daughter.
    --- Automatic Post Merged, Jan 3, 2018 ---
    I'm with you there Paul,I am an avid plastic hater,I always refuse plastic bags,I bring my own re-usable,I refuse plastic cutlery at take-away,I keep metal cutlery in my truck and I recycle as much as possible.And I always condemn people who buy lots of bottles of water (if you are out and get thirsty then sure buy a drink if you have to). Water comes out of the tap for free,just refill your bottle don't throw it away.
     
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  13. vampstorso

    vampstorso Very Well-Known Member

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    Conveniently found a simple video about what I was mentioning.

    You'll either love or hate Hank. Personally I love him and found his videos helpful at uni.

     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2018
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  14. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    You must cringe at the sight of your plastic bank cards and plastic money... and all those with plastic surgery. LOL
     
  15. pinefamily

    pinefamily Subscriber Subscriber

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    Bag It is another good doco on plastics.
    The trouble with most so called plastic bag bans is they don't ban all plastic bags. Here in SA, a "ban" in place since 2009, we still have "heavy duty" plastic bags, and so called biodegradable plastic bags, which only really break down into tiny pieces as they degrade. In the ocean and waterways these bags break down and are ingested by the sea and river creatures.
    By drinking bottled water, you are not only sustaining the plastic industry (Coca Cola refuses to use recycled plastic bottles), but the water is either purified tap water or groundwater, another valuable resource.
    @Aussiepride83, not having a go at you, but there is a difference in a plastic bag or bottle, and plastic bank cards or money, or even a plastic bucket. Single use. While we all should reduce our plastic usage, it is the single use plastics that are the biggest problem.
    And in case anyone doesn't know, you can recycle all soft plastics, like bags, wraps, etc., at your local Coles supermarket. We save all ours in a plastic bag and drop it off weekly. Chip packets, the plastic on fruit and veg (even the net bags are nylon), anything. They trick you with things like chip packets because they look like foil, but they aren't. One of the big bosses from Coles was interviewed on War on Waste; he said they will take all soft plastics, not just bags.
     
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  16. Scutellatus

    Scutellatus Well-Known Member

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    Did you see the episode on War on Waste where they tracked where those plastic bags go? They placed a tracking device in with some bags they put in the bag recycling bin and the majority ended up in landfill. I think that may have been with Woolworths.
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2018
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  17. Prof_Moreliarty

    Prof_Moreliarty Well-Known Member

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    You give bottled water company’s too much credit @pinefamily. They do sell tap water as spring water and it’s been filtered to reduce chlorine taste and odour but its nowhere near purified.
     
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  18. Pauls_Pythons

    Pauls_Pythons Power Seller Power Seller

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    Many of them take tap water and put it through a process you may have heard of called reverse osmosis to removed additives such as chlorine.
    People pay more for bottled water that comes from the tap than they do for petrol but never complain about it.
    --- Automatic Post Merged, Jan 4, 2018, Original Post Date: Jan 4, 2018 ---
    100% agree. My issue is not with plastic in its entirety, its about the single use plastics that we really don't need. Plastic has been around a long time and is an awesome product in many applications. But people fail to see the real issues with a product that simply isn't recycled to any great extent......in fact many companies refuse to use recycled plastics for containers because the consumer wants a clear appearance that can not be achieved with recycled product.
    I learned a few weeks ago that China actually recycles 60+% of the worlds plastics at present but they are about to stop taking plastic from other country's as they no longer need it. **** is about to get far worse and some people just seem to take it as a joke......
     
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  19. pinefamily

    pinefamily Subscriber Subscriber

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    I probably used the wrong word in purified.
    What happens with plastic production when oil gets scarcer?
    Business won't really get involved in recycling because there are no visible profits. This is where governments need to step in, but I can't see our weak pollies doing anything. We've lost industry after industry, so why not a government-backed recycling industry? We could become world leaders. Maybe then recycled products won't cost as much as they do.
     
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  20. Imported_tuatara

    Imported_tuatara Well-Known Member

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    @pinefamily the stickers on most fruits are eatable, so are the glues
     
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