Diamond Hibernation

Discussion in 'Australian Snakes' started by Biasi, Apr 10, 2020.

  1. Biasi

    Biasi Not so new Member

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    Hey all, I got my first diamond python about 12 weeks ago and he was eating fine but in the last 6 or so weeks he has refused food and only sits in his cool hide. So I’m just wondering do diamond pythons need to hibernate or if this is something else
     
  2. RAIDERSGOULDY

    RAIDERSGOULDY Not so new Member

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    What temps are you running?
    What size tank is he/she in and how big is he/she?
    Add some photos if you can
     
  3. Biasi

    Biasi Not so new Member

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    475D2EEB-53AE-40F2-B633-895D9F35605F.jpeg
    --- Automatic Post Merged, Apr 11, 2020, Original Post Date: Apr 11, 2020 ---
    He’s in a 1.2 metre long 60 tall tank with a hotspot of 27-30 and a cool spot of around 22.

    he is a 3 year old rescue about 1metre long. He has a few scars and is missing the end of his tail (hence the low height of the tank)
     
  4. RAIDERSGOULDY

    RAIDERSGOULDY Not so new Member

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    I'd drop the temp to 25-27 mate and see if that helps
     
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  5. Biasi

    Biasi Not so new Member

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    yeah cheers, the thermostat is set to turn the lights off at 32 but it generally gets to around 27-28. Should i drop it or is it fine if it’s hitting 27 majority of the time?
     
  6. RAIDERSGOULDY

    RAIDERSGOULDY Not so new Member

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    I would drop it a bit. My Diamond seems to like 25-26 max. Once it hits that he will move to the cool end
     
  7. MattPat

    MattPat Not so new Member

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    I respectfully disagree with the temp recommendations above.

    Diamonds love heat that mimics the heat of the sun. In indoor captivity this should be a light emitting globe, positioned above a perch or shelf. The heat needs to come from above, not below (i.e. no heat mats etc).

    Instead of having a hot and cold area in the tank, the heat under the globe should hit around 30 degrees celsius but only for 3 to 4 hours a day, preferably in the morning. After that, all heat should be turned off for the rest of the day and night (unless you live in a really cold climate in the mountains or something).

    Having an area in the tank that is 30 degrees all day will likely be causing the problem you are seeing in your diamond at the moment.

    Just my 2 cents.
     
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  8. Biasi

    Biasi Not so new Member

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    Hey man, I see what you're saying but this guy happily sits under his basking light for 6+ hours during the middle of the day, he loves to climb around and I hear him pushing his hides over most nights. I live near the city but my parents keep the aircon pumping at 20 degrees pretty much constantly, because of that he has that hot perch area of 27/28 degrees on all day and night. (I am open to change this, just what I was told by the vet and pet shop when I got him)
     
  9. MattPat

    MattPat Not so new Member

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    Well, why did he stop eating then?

    It is too hot in there. 20 degrees would be fine as an ambient temperature.

    Diamonds are cool climate snakes.

    6 weeks ago would take you to February, which is still summer. Certainly not the time of year that you would expect a healthy diamond to go off their food.
    --- Automatic Post Merged, Apr 12, 2020, Original Post Date: Apr 12, 2020 ---
    Again - the heat should be 30 degrees under the basking light but only for 3 to 4 hours a day.

    Do that and your diamond will thrive.
     
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  10. Biasi

    Biasi Not so new Member

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    I’m not disagreeing with you, I was just stating what I had been recommended when I got the snake, I also don’t think he is the healthiest of snakes, I got him from a rescuer but when I saw the vet just to give him a check when I first got him he had a non snake mite and as mentioned is missing the last 4 or 5 cm of his tail along with a fair few scars on his back. The vet thinks he either ate live or was kept outside.
     
  11. MattPat

    MattPat Not so new Member

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    Fair enough, but it sounds like the advice you were given was a bit off.

    Many people (even some vets) assume that keeping diamonds is the same as keeping other pythons, but they have unique keeping requirements. Lots of people keep diamonds way too hot.
     
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  12. Biasi

    Biasi Not so new Member

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    cheers man, I’ll drop the thermostat down and readjust the timer now. Just wondering, is there a time I should expect him to go off feed. I only have lizards who eat all year round
     
  13. Herptology

    Herptology Well-Known Member

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    Assuming you’re planning on cooling, he would go off food in the next month or so till August~

    AA8A6528-D982-44C0-8E01-E18A2F144CFF.jpeg
     
  14. Biasi

    Biasi Not so new Member

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    Is there any reason to cool him?
     
  15. Allan

    Allan Subscriber Subscriber

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    You should post that full page without the blacked out sections.

    That would help a lot of newbies who come here and start the "My snake won't eat" threads.
    --- Automatic Post Merged, Apr 12, 2020, Original Post Date: Apr 12, 2020 ---
    The cooling will trigger the mating instinct when spring comes around.

    Regardless if you're planning to breed him or not, the cooling will also give him a good rest and you'll have a healthier python.
     
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  16. Biasi

    Biasi Not so new Member

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    dorry to be annoying, but to cool does he have no heating during that time or just 3-4 hours as mentioned above. He’s my first bigger snake and I’m not to sure
     
  17. MattPat

    MattPat Not so new Member

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    It means no heat at all. But make sure he doesnt have any undigested food in his gut.
     
  18. Herptology

    Herptology Well-Known Member

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    dont go telling people not to heat at all -- its the quickest way to make a snake sick if you arent experienced

    even on <15c days, if you measure the temperature of a large rock, you will find it reaches temps of the mid 30s

    the best way is to heat for a short period of time, say from 10-3 at regular 30c temps

    makes sure you gradually lower the times to 10-3 at end of june
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2020
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  19. Biasi

    Biasi Not so new Member

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    Update: I offered him food last night and he took it, I’ll be looking at changing the temps as he goes into cooling but at least he’s eaten
     
  20. Pauls_Pythons

    Pauls_Pythons Power Seller Power Seller

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    I have been keeping Diamonds now for about 20 years so I have learned a thing or 2.
    Not saying my way is the best or the only way but I think there is a lot of misinformation around regarding their temperature requirements that often leads to health problems and even premature death.
    Not going to preach what you should do but will rather tell you what I do and leave it up to you to decide.
    My adults & sub adults are heated between 4 and 6 hours a day during spring, summer and autumn and a maximum of 4 hours per day during winter.
    Temps are allowed to go up to 40 directly under the heat source but the enclosures are large, (2m tall, 1.5m wide and 600mm deep) and therefor offer the animal numerous options to choose the most appropriate temperature. (Your enclosure is not large enough to support these temps so please do not try)
    An enclosure such as the one you are using I would suggest similar heating periods with a maximum temp of 30-32, never above 35 and certainly no longer than 6 hours. Remember both excessive heat and cold both kill but a cool environment will kill animals much slower.

    In winter I brumate all diamonds over 1.5 years old, (NO FOOD). Brumation is critical to your snakes health but again if you turn the heat off completely or dont offer high enough temps they can suffer from RI.

    My adults are fed sparingly, every 3 or 4 weeks during the appropriate time of year. But then again I have never bought into this idea of power feeding/over feeding snakes to get them big and fat so they can be bred at a young age. Mine will have one more feed before cooler nights set in and that will be it till spring.
     
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