Diamond yearling not eating

Discussion in 'General Reptile Discussion' started by monty83python, Aug 3, 2016.

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  1. monty83python

    monty83python New Member

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    Hi all, first timer posting here.

    We got a diamond yearling (sex unknown) nearly 3 months ago and 'he' has only fed twice, he regurgitated his first feed with us due to lack of enough heat and stress maybe, but the next 2 feeds were successful, but he not feed for about 6 weeks now and from what I hear that is quite normal this time of year. I guess i am looking for reassurance that this is normal for a yearling and how often I should re-try?
    Secondly, I have queried this with the reptile specialist store that we bought our set up from, but they have advised that we should heat to 28c 24/7.... this seems unnatural from where they come from eg. NSW Sth Coast, where I have lived and it never get's that hot overnight... thoughts??
    Lastly, should we have a UV light? We have infrared for heating and a heatpad, but they have said it's up to us to add UV, is it necessary?

    He is happy and healthy looking and has successfully shed once.

    Thanks!!!
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2016
  2. JackTheHerper

    JackTheHerper Well-Known Member

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    I'm not 100% sure on heating, But i suggested "Braining" the food item to another user and it worked for them, Basicaly exposing the brain matter to provoke a stronger feeding responce since freezing and de-thawing probably takes away alot of the smell, Hope your little one gets feeding again and good luck.
     
  3. pythoninfinite

    pythoninfinite Subscriber Subscriber

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    For snakes up to two or three years old, you can supply heat 24/7, or maybe drop it by 3-4 degrees for 12 hours at night. Indeed, it is probably wise to give them access to heat for at least a few hours a day, even in winter. It is likely that you are not supplying sufficient heat for the snake to operate efficiently and keep feeding, but at 28C, it is still warm enough to remain active. You should increase the hot-spot temps to around 32-33C for 12-14 hours a day, then drop to about 26-28C at night. Many are reluctant to offer suitably warm basking spots for Diamonds, believing that they live in a cool climate, but they are energy magnets when given access to the sun on cold days, and they can get very warm to touch on cold but sunny days.

    The temps on the south coast do get very hot sometimes on summer days, and ground temps will remain quite warm for hours after dark - don't take the air temp readings from the BOM as useful or appropriate for your snake. The other thing with wild Diamonds is that they bask even on cold but sunny winter days, and reach quite high body temps within a short time, then they retreat into their hides, curl up tight and conserve that collected solar energy for as long as possible, remaining warm for at least several hours. They don't have the luxury of these choices when kept indoors in small enclosures, so you need to offer them choice, especially when they are young.

    Adult Diamonds should be offered a warm basking spot for a few hours a day during winter, but most keepers don't supply any heat for maybe 18 hours a day in the cooler months.

    Jamie
     
  4. meako

    meako Not so new Member

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    UV isn't necessary but an occasional spell out in the sunshine won't hurt.
    Diamonds are the most southerly ranging python in the world.
    If you are on the Sth Coast now it is the middle of winter then 3 months off food is not outrageous.
    How is he kept? ie noise ,light,vibrations etc. Don't forget they are world hide and seek champions and not creatures that enjoy constant interaction with their human.
    What are you feeding him size wise? If he can ohnnly just get it down thats what to aim for-They invest a lot of energy in simply eating .
    Maybe try quails if you haven't already.
    What temps have you got in the enclosure.
    Keep in mind that constantly high temps are not natural for this snake in the wild.
    A warm period during the day is when they "refuel" and come out at dusk for a hunt -which is when their wild prey would be active.
    Then as the night cools down they go quiet again.
    I'm in the Illawarra and have encountered one or two diamonds that were big old bruisers and very healthy looking apart from ticks.
    I'm sure people with more knowledge and experience will chime in for you.
    Main thing is he looks healthy and not scrawny.
    Have you had him to the vet yet for a basic sort of check up?-and you will find out if Pete is actually Petra:D
    3 months is not a long time for him to get used to new surroundings.
    I'd observe his activities at various times of day and night-searching around the enclosure is a sign that he is maybe hungry and time to try a feed.
    The reptile store with all due respect is a store- and are more than happy if you spend lots of money on stuff you don't really need.
    Any pics of the snake and setup would be helpful too.
    cheers.Don't panic.
     
  5. pythoninfinite

    pythoninfinite Subscriber Subscriber

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    I think you'll find that Diamonds, being Carpets by another name, are easy feeders, and just about the only thing that will slow them down is being kept too cool. It's a mistake to immediately rush off and try some other type of food like quail - it's almost unheard of for a Carpet/Diamond, kept within suitable husbandry parameters, to refuse rats or mice, and if you start fooling around with choices, you may be creating more problems for yourself. The animal is probably too young to be affected by hormonal influences, a common issue with non-feeding males, so a vet visit is probably a pointless exercise. 28C as a constant max is probably about 4 or 5 degrees too cool, you should aim for a max of around 32-33C for at least a few hours a day, and offer food in the early evening while the enclosure is still warm.

    Jamie
     
  6. meako

    meako Not so new Member

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    Whilst i defer to your greater experience Jamie I still think it would be a good idea to get it sexed at the vets . Knowledge is power.The local vet charged me 12bux(what a ripoff)
    :D
     
  7. pythoninfinite

    pythoninfinite Subscriber Subscriber

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    No deference needed (or expected) matey, but I wonder why this might be important in a yearling snake, unless there are plans to breed in the future. It's unlikely that hormonal influences would be playing a part at this age. Your vet is an honourable operator by the way (most are, I'm sure) - I've known a vet somewhere north of Sydney to charge $150 for that quick & simple service. Certainly won't do any harm, but I wonder how it relates to the OP's question re: feeding. Just seems obvious to me that it's probably a bit too cool.

    Jamie
     
  8. monty83python

    monty83python New Member

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    Thanks to everyone so far, some great info! In regards to it's gender, as a first timer on the forum I noted many stating what sex their snake is, as I didn't know, I thought it worthy of mention, but will omit it if it's irrelevant, not too fused about the sex and may get him checked at some stage.
    As for feeding, we have feed with adult mice and baby rats, we were advised anything roughly twice the diameter of the snakes widest point, and that he will only eat what he can eat....?
    There would be a little stress in his life being that his enclosure is in the lounge room and we have 2 young kids who make plenty of noise and banging and crashing :)
    The enclosure has a 100watt infrared light, heat pad on about 1/3 of the base, thermostat hanging in middle set to 28c. Enclosure get's direct sunlight for an hour or so in the mornings when I open the blinds, I would say come summer though he will be kept in the dark for the day due to trying to keep the summer heat out, would we need UV then? The living room is quite a dark room..... We used to live Sth Coast NSW so know the climate, but now in Adelaide.
    What are the best options for automating the temp drop in the evenings? Happy to do it manually but won't always be here.

    I've attached a pic of our setup and him.
    setup.jpg
    Diamon yearing.jpg
     
  9. pythoninfinite

    pythoninfinite Subscriber Subscriber

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    You can get night-drop thermostats which allow you to adjust the times and temps when you want to vary them for whatever reason - they are useful for breeders when they want extended cooling hours to enhance fertility. Check out the Herp Shop website.

    Jamie
     
  10. hulloosenator

    hulloosenator Active Member

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    You do not need to feed you snake between the months of April and September/October and I don't know why nobody has mentioned that. They don't eat in the wild between those months. Your snake looks healthy enough , so just don't even try to feed him til the end of September and you will find it will jump at it , and it will still look just as healthy.
    How do I know ??? ...... Been breeding them for 40 years.

    And as far as heating goes ........ I have a light at one end of a rectangular cage and hide box at the other. The snakes come out to sunbathe when they are cold and move away gradually as they warm up and back in the hide box when heated up. The lights come on for a few hours in the morning and a few in the arvo. Never at night. They don't need night time heat.
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2016
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