Difference between western and central netted dragon

Discussion in 'Australian Lizards and Monitors' started by Onix95, Feb 22, 2018.

  1. Onix95

    Onix95 New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2017
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    2
    Gender:
    Male
    what is the difference between the western and central netted dragon? and can you keep either in WA?
     
  2. Scutellatus

    Scutellatus Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2017
    Messages:
    899
    Likes Received:
    1,080
    Gender:
    Male
    As far as I know only species from Western Australia are allowed to be kept there, but @Nero Egernia would be your best bet for answering your questions. She is from Western Australia and has kept Western Netteds.
     
  3. Nero Egernia

    Nero Egernia Subscriber Subscriber

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2015
    Messages:
    766
    Likes Received:
    1,305
    Location:
    Western Australia
    Both species are native to Western Australia but only the Western Netted Dragon (Ctenophorus reticulatus) can be kept here. You'll need a category 3 reptile keeping licence or higher if you wish to keep them.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2018
    pinefamily and MANNING like this.
  4. Onix95

    Onix95 New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2017
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    2
    Gender:
    Male
    is there a difference in care because i cant find much information on the western netted but heaps on the central
     
  5. Nero Egernia

    Nero Egernia Subscriber Subscriber

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2015
    Messages:
    766
    Likes Received:
    1,305
    Location:
    Western Australia
    I've never kept Central Netted Dragons but I have kept and bred Western Netted Dragons. Only have one left now. See pictures here and here.

    From what I can tell their husbandry's fairly similar. They like a hot spot of 38-45°C. The remainder of the enclosure is left to ambient temperatures. Despite their diminutive size, these lizards are a highly active species and will appreciate a decent amount of space. A deep sandy substrate is perfect for them and I wouldn't house them on anything else. Oddly enough, I've seen people keeping them on paper-pellet cat litter! They feed predominantly on insects but will occasionally take greens. They have a high metabolism so feeding should be regular, everyday for juveniles and every 2-3 days for adults, maybe more depending on activity level. They'll drink from a water bowl, but I find spraying them to be just as effective, particularly with juveniles.

    Research as much as you can. These books are a good start.

    A Guide to . . . Australian Dragons in Captivity by Dr Dany Brown.
    Keeping and Breeding Australian Lizards edited by Mike Swan.
     
    Stompsy, pinefamily and dragonlover1 like this.

Share This Page