Do the regs need to be changed?

Discussion in 'Reptile News' started by Pauls_Pythons, Nov 6, 2017.

  1. Scutellatus

    Scutellatus Well-Known Member

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    I will try to find the interview. In this interview he definitely stated what I have written above.
     
  2. Pauls_Pythons

    Pauls_Pythons Power Seller Power Seller

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    Sorry mate I missed this comment. Yes I am sure. The regs were amended in 2016 to ensure that under 18's had some evidence of competency such as a handlers course but for over 18's to upgrade from basic to advanced licence you just pay the difference. That advanced licence allows the holder to keep ven's. Below extract from the licence application.

    Licence Holders under 18 years of age seeking an Advanced Wildlife Licence for the purposes of keeping venomous snakes must include documentary evidence of competency in the safe-handling of venomous snakes and the signature of their parent or guardian. Contact the DELWP Customer Service Centre on 136 186 for details.
     
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  3. Scutellatus

    Scutellatus Well-Known Member

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    It isn't coming up on my phone now for some reason. Whether it is because the story wasn't correct and has been removed or something else I am not sure.

    I seriously doubt someone with his experience would be handling venomous while feeding, but it could be the case.
    He also said that he usually does everything with his Dad but this time he had a friend there and that his Dad met them at the hospital.

    I'll keep searching, hopefully I can find it.
     
  4. cement

    cement Subscriber Subscriber APS Veteran

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    maybe you need to read the story again.
    “He (Fang) could smell the rodents in the air and he just kind of went into his feeding frenzy,” Chetcuti said. “I readjusted my hand on the hook, and I wasn’t paying full attention to him and he spun around and got me. He wasn’t aggressive but he was just looking for his food really.”
    The mistake was prepping for feeding (ie rats thawing in the same room, or somewhere the snake could smell food) while cleaning and handling.
    We all make mistakes though, and he did the right thing as far as having safety protocol in place for such an event.
     
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  5. Scutellatus

    Scutellatus Well-Known Member

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    Maybe you need to read what I have written before commenting. I read what I have written somewhere and it wasn't a shock and awe story written the day after the bite, this was a week or two after the event. As I said I will try to find the story, I i haven't had much luck yet, but will keep trying.
    Remember we are talking about the media here who can be full of rubbish for effect when writing a story, the same media that were calling him an idiot because of videos he had on his YouTube.
    --- Automatic Post Merged, Jan 28, 2018, Original Post Date: Jan 28, 2018 ---
    Here is part of it:
    Luckily his best friend was with him at the time and called an ambulance.

    https://www.9news.com.au/national/2...bitten-by-deadly-pet-taipan-plans-to-keep-him

    I will keep searching for the rest.

    A couple of points I will mention.
    If he had rodents in the room the snake would have been in a "Feeding Frenzy" before being picked up to be placed back in the enclosure, not when he was at the enclosure.

    The story doesn't say what distracted him so his full attention wasn't with the Taipan.
    The story I read does give this information.

    When they speak of his father they always say "reportedly with him", journalist talk for we have copied the story from another news organisation and don't have first hand information.
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2018
  6. cement

    cement Subscriber Subscriber APS Veteran

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    Don't bother. I can't be bothered trying to spell it out for you.
     
  7. GBWhite

    GBWhite Well-Known Member

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    From what I've read, seen and heard about this young fellow he has made a lot of rookie mistakes and it seems pretty consistent with those across the board who are just getting into keeping vens.

    From personal experience there are a number of suggestions I'd like to make for anyone intending to or currently keeping dangerous vens.

    All species of dangerous vens react to situations differently to each other. Before acquisition research the species one intends to keep. Talk to people who handle dangerous vens on a regular basis. People such as private keepers, zoo keepers, demonstrators and if possible field workers to gain as much knowledge about the mannerisms of the species.

    Always be vigilant and alert when handling them. Always make sure you are aware of where the snake is before opening the enclosure. Clean each cage one at a time. Use a hook to uncover the snake from a hide or substrate and move it or lift it up to access the tail.

    Never, ever trust them no matter how long they have been held in captivity. Keep handling to the very minimum. When handling always tail to have control over it's movement and use a hook to support their body weight but try and keep the snake suspended on the hook for as little time as possible.

    Except where they are being kept in pits, never keep more than one specimen in an enclosure.

    Don't keep them in front opening enclosures. They are too unpredictable and can be difficult to remove from and replace back into the enclosure during cleaning, especially when warm and active. Top opening enclosures at waist level provide a far better and safer way to manage, remove and replace them. It also provides safer access to feed the critter.

    When cleaning, remove them from the enclosure and place them directly into a plastic garbage bin and secure the lid. Again this provides safe access to the snake when removing it from the bin to place back in it's enclosure.

    Never use tongs when feeding. After cleaning place the food item(s) in the enclosure prior to replacing the snake. Personally I don't think that it makes that much difference if the food items are held in a snake room during cleaning. If anything it does make them aware that a food item is in the vicinity. They will become more active and may move around their enclosure in anticipation but from experience I doubt very much if one could say that they go into a "feeding frenzy". However; all snakes held in the same room will become aware of the food items within a very short time of being brought into the room and will instinctively react to the smell. This will happen whether the food item is in or near the room during cleaning or as soon as the food items are brought in and placed about in the enclosures.

    Accidents do happen, so make sure there are a couple of pressure bandages handy and that all the household know the correct first aid procedure for snake bite. It will save your life and I can attest to the personally.

    Last of all NEVER free handle vens.

    Cheers,

    George.
     
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  8. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    Very informative George.
     

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