Enclosure planning, am I on the right track?

Discussion in 'DIY Zone' started by Ghillies, Jan 7, 2016.

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  1. Ghillies

    Ghillies Not so new Member

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    Hey everyone,

    So I'm in the process of planning a enclosure for my Woma and maybe one to stack on top for a future scaly friend and was looking for some feed back to see if I'm on the right track.

    So planning to build a 1200x600x450mm (LxWxH) from ply wood, 12mm back, top and sides and 18mm for bottom. Will be fully sealed inside and painted/stained on the outside. The enclosure will sit 650mm off the ground, would have it higher but I want to stack another enclosure on top at some point and don't want it to be to high.

    For heating I emailed Pro Herp about their Heat panels after searching through the forum and was recommended a 80w panel and I'm probably going to use a dimming Thermostat (recommendations welcome). Going to use LEDs on a timer to provide ambient lighting.

    will attempt a rock wall/hide/feature of some sort but I do lack artistic skill so will see how that turns out. How large should I have the hide? Going to use a 1nch or 2 layer of sand for substrate.

    unsure of sizing for ventilation, going to have the cool end ventilation on the top as that side will be up against a wall and on the side down low on the warm end. If it makes a difference I live in South West QLD which is dry most of the year.

    later down the track I plan to build a 1200x600x600 to house another scaly friend, possibly a Blue/Pink tongue skink, small monitor species or Python. This will be stacked on top. If more space becomes available ill probably make the Woma enclosure higher and opt for a taller enclosure for a Rough Scale or Carpet but all this will be thought about in depth more when I get closer to it.

    Thanks, Dan.
     
  2. Burgo89

    Burgo89 Active Member

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    I'm planning on a similar build. My concern is heat mats I have been told aren't to good on wood enclosures, Maybe look into cord instead. Why the 18mm floor? with the vents keep the cool side low and the warm vent high. As hot air rises and exits the enclosure It will draw cool air in giving a good flow through the whole enclosure.

    good luck to you and keep us updated with the build?
     
  3. Ghillies

    Ghillies Not so new Member

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    Will definitely keep things updated!

    now I was talking about a Heat panel which mounts to the ceiling of the enclosure and radiates heat down and will keep looking at ventilation. More worried about actual size of vents to use.

    thanks.
     
  4. pythoninfinite

    pythoninfinite Subscriber Subscriber

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    Suggestion - don't use sand as a substrate. Not a good choice for a number of reasons. Much better to use one of the commercial substrate mixes which are much more absorbent, lighter and have a warmer feel if you don't like newspaper, which is probably the best and most hygienic substrate. Womas are not climbers by nature, so you'd have to have some means of it reaching the heat panel if you choose that for your heating, For a woma I'd choose to have a heat cord sandwiched between two floor tiles for it to lie on as a heat source, just make sure you leave a space for a thermostat probe between the tiles. Much safer than a heat mat, which are probably the most dangerous heat source you can choose.

    Jamie
     
  5. Virides

    Virides Not so new Member

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    Good luck on the build :)

    If you are going to have sliding glass on your enclosures, we strongly recommend against having ground in grooves done by your glazier. These are permanent and uncomfortable to use.

    We design and manufacture all of our Sliding Glass Finger Grips. They are comfortable to use since your hand can splay across the item rather than compressing your fingers to a point, as happens with grooves (they can also have quite sharp edges). They also have incredible bond strength and will last you years, but if need be they can be removed to return to a clean panel of glass.

    You can see our full range at - virides.com.au/shop/sliding-glass-finger-grips
    We use Paypal for secure payments (All major credit cards accepted and you don't even need a Paypal account).
     
  6. Ghillies

    Ghillies Not so new Member

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    That's for the tips, again as far as I'm aware those Heat panels by pro Herp are much like the CHE's in that they radiat Heat down and doesn't require the animal to be in contact with it. This is coming from a number of Searches on Google and forums and I'm pretty sure someone on here uses them for BHP's. Heat cord sandwiched between tiles is my next option.

    Also so I searched the use of sand before posting and it seems to have mixed thoughts, with it being mentioned as a substrate for both Woma's and BHPs although it seems it requires more up keep and has the potential to cause complications. May not use as much as previously mentioned but If I was to opt for something else what would be close to sand in appearance?

    Another question about securing rock walls, hides and features so they aren't moved around so much by the snake, what is recommended.

    thanks again guys.

    - - - Updated - - -

    What about the ceramic substrate reptile one does? like the small ceramic pearls? I'm after something some what realistic.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Also seems sand can be mixed with coco fibre/peat to make a desert look alike substrate, maybe might just setting for Lino with earthy tones.

    - - - Updated - - -

    So spent the last day re-researching a few things...

    and well it seems a lot of substrates besides newspaper or butchers paper have its down side. If anyone has a nice enclosure with these please put up pics.

    was keen on aspen but it seems like pretty expensive option, so I've thought about using a textured sand coloured linoleum/vinyl sheet (non adhesive backing) and then making 1/3 to 1/2 the enclosure a 25-50mm deep pit to put a substrate such as aspen in.

    or just use the lino sheeting and no loose substrate although I would like fort Woma to dig and burrow if she pleases.

    so far still keen on the 80w radiant heat panel from Pro Herp.

    i will attempt a hide and give it a flat spot on top so she can choose to sit on top and get closer to the heat panel.
     
  7. Ghillies

    Ghillies Not so new Member

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    So things have changed and I'm getting a male/female pair of albino Darwins very soon and so I need a home for them.

    either going to go with 2 1200x600x600, 1500x600x600 or 1200x900x600 and stacked on top of each other.

    for heating I was set on routing lines in the enclosure floor for heat cord and silconing a 400x400 tile on top otherwise 2nd option is a pro herp heat panel. Either option will run off a pulse purportional thermostat.

    going to offer either a 300mm shelf along the back or a branch across the enclosure to give the pythons somewhere to get up off the ground.

    As I live in a area that gets quiet cold in winter (-2) and hot in summer (40+) and generally around 40-60% humidity is there any special considerations to take into account for ventilation? Looking at Haron 245x145mm or 2 or 3 130mm round vents each side.
     
  8. Wally

    Wally Subscriber Subscriber

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    With all due respect Virides that is complete nonsense and nothing more than a marketing pitch to attract sales. I've been using finger grooves in my enclosures for years and my opinion of them is at complete odds with yours.
     
  9. Virides

    Virides Not so new Member

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    Well it's not untrue to say that ground in grooves are permanent, because they are. Once you grind it in, if you don't want it to be there anymore, a new panel of glass is needed. With our Sliding Glass Finger Grips, you just remove them.

    As for ground in grooves being uncomfortable to use, it's not to say at all times they are. While it could have been worded differently, the reference being made was when a panel is difficult to move, the ground in groove can apply greater pressure on your finger tips. With our grips you are able to spread your fingers over a greater distance and exact more grip which can help with moving difficult panels. It's about the idea that if you bunch up your fingers and press them on the table, it feels a lot different when you spread your fingers apart and enact the same force.

    Your enclosures might be free moving and thus have no problem here, but the first statement is still true, you can't remove ground in grooves.

    It's personal preference after all and what we say about our product is what was done to address these issues which can and do occur with ground in grooves.
     
  10. Ghillies

    Ghillies Not so new Member

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    Okay... Guys please this question I've just posted is actually stressing me out as its the last few things I need to settle on before I can start my build and receive my beautiful pair of albinos!

    yes for glass I'll probably go finger tabs maybe yours maybe not but my issue now is method of heating and enclosure sizing. Been thinking more about the heating. If I go the heat panel route I would like to get away with a 28 or 40w panel and either use a partition or boxing in the area so to reduce the area to heat and Reducing the effect on ambient temp....

    other option im looking at is either routing into the floor or make a shelf and doing the same, thread heat cord in the slots and cover with a tile. 400x400/450x450 appropriate for a 2-2.5m Python?

    would really love answers please and thanks!
     
  11. Tinky

    Tinky Very Well-Known Member

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    Just a suggestion. On the back of my display enclosure I used 3mm ply, (see photo album on my member page).

    Why:
    1) Structure was solid enough with heavier ply used on sides, bottom and top.
    2) Lowered the overall weight of the enclosure.
    3) Cheaper than heavier ply.
     
  12. Ghillies

    Ghillies Not so new Member

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    thanks mate I've now decided to go with traditional melamine as my girlfriends father owns a joinery and can help me out there. My only worry now is in regards to heating and venting...
     
  13. Tinky

    Tinky Very Well-Known Member

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    Waterproof Melemine, or just sealed really well?
     
  14. Ghillies

    Ghillies Not so new Member

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    The normal laminated melamine with the inside joins sealed well
     
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