feeder fish.

Discussion in 'Australian Lizards and Monitors' started by mareebapython, Oct 31, 2012.

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  1. mareebapython

    mareebapython Active Member

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    i guess water dragons would eat fish in the wild so i was thinking about getting some feeder fish. just wanted to make sure its okay to feed them to it first?
    cheers.
     
  2. Xanthine

    Xanthine Not so new Member

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    Any common fish should be fine, but don't feed goldfish! They're quite high in fat, and also thiaminase, which they release when they stress out (ie being attacked), and it makes them deficient in thiamine, vitamin B1.
     
  3. mareebapython

    mareebapython Active Member

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    so guppies will be fine then? and how often should they be fed to it?
     
  4. geckodan

    geckodan Very Well-Known Member

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    Most low end, benthic feeding, freshwater fish (Carps, minnows, eel) contain thiaminases. They are not released in the live fish (as this would disadvantage the fish too). The chemical released in the stressed live fish is called a Schreckstoff chemical and warns other fish of danger but has no physiological effect on the predator. Thiaminases are released as a result of an unfortunate (for frozen fish users) chemical reaction after the fish is frozen and thawed. So fed fresh these fish are perfectly safe. Most readily available feeder fish are quite ok to use. One trick if feeding them fresh killed is to smear the bottom of the feed bowl with a dab of vaseline or vege oil so that the drying fish doesn't stick to the bowl in the heat of the enclosure.
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2012
  5. someday

    someday Active Member

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    was thinking of doing the same thing last week but had 2nd thoughts if he didnt take the fish then id have to keep it..but i would like to see him running around chasing 1, i had fun watching him chase a fly for 10mins till he cornered it.
     
  6. dozerman

    dozerman Active Member

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    Geckodan if your books are as informative as your post I will buy the lot :)

    Does the same apply for crustaceans eg. yabbies
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2012
  7. geckodan

    geckodan Very Well-Known Member

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    That's the short answer version.
    Crustacean do not contain thiaminases so they are no risk. If you intend to feed quantities of thawed fish then its simple enough to compensate by adding "seabird tablets" (google them) into the abdomen of the fish to compensate.
     
  8. Justdragons

    Justdragons Very Well-Known Member

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    I get a large sisteema tub with no lid and put 5 or 6 fish in it for them.. its bloody hilarious to watch them work out that just cause they can see through the side doesnt mean they can get through it.. but 9 times out of ten it ends in fish meal for em :)
     
  9. GeckoJosh

    GeckoJosh Almost Legendary

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    Thanks for clarifying this, I have been so paranoid about feeding Goldfish and Koi to my Tree snakes since hearing they may contain thiaminases.
     
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