Feral dogs hunting Kangaroo

Discussion in 'Other Animals and Invertebrate' started by marcus0002, Jun 7, 2014.

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  1. marcus0002

    marcus0002 Guest

  2. champagne

    champagne Well-Known Member

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  3. marcus0002

    marcus0002 Guest

    umm the dogs. Shooting roos is illegal without a permit.
     
  4. champagne

    champagne Well-Known Member

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    I was having a joke but they both need controlling.
     
  5. marcus0002

    marcus0002 Guest

    Sorry mate, humor doesn't always come through via the written from.
     
  6. Dummo

    Dummo New Member

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    IMO they are the equivalent to hairy cane toad, same with cats. I have both but they are securely housed (cat doesn't even go outside).
     
  7. SteveNT

    SteveNT Very Well-Known Member

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    I watched feral dogs pull down a Banteng (Balinese) cow in the National Park on Cobourg Peninsula (Arnhem Land). I used to walk through all that country and wouldn't have stood a chance against that pack. Happily the Indigenous Rangers tracked and shot the lot over the next two weeks. Seems illegal piggers south of the park had lost their dogs and it wasn't the first time (or the last).
     
  8. mikey_mike

    mikey_mike Active Member

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    I'm not disputing that dogs can be damaging in some circumstances, nor that they should be managed, but they're nothing like foxes or toads. Dogs have moved straight into the niche occupied by dingos, which in turn moved in to the niche occupied by thylacines.

    I didn't watch the video, but dogs predating kangaroos sounds pretty natural to me.
     
  9. champagne

    champagne Well-Known Member

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    The problem is that due to farming both dog and roo numbers get out of balance with the rest of the eco system.
     
  10. Gizmo101

    Gizmo101 Subscriber Subscriber

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    IMO they're pests, just like wild cats, pigs, cane toads, etc. we've had them on our property before, they killed our sheep, goats and chickens. Thankfully they never touched the horses.


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  11. Dummo

    Dummo New Member

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    I have come across feral dogs many times and dingos a fair few times and I'll tell ya they are NOT like dingos every dingo I have come across has gone running the other direction whilst the dogs seem to be more aggressive, barking at me and in some cases running towards me.
     
  12. zulu

    zulu Very Well-Known Member

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    The dingoes are also super cunning, i got of a bus at the alice springs telegraph station in the 80s and head up the nearby hill looking for reptiles.
    The rest of the bus trip ( normal people LOL ) headed in to the station with the tour guide ,from the top of the hill i watched a dingo run in and check the scene around the bus .the group never seen a thing .
     
  13. longqi

    longqi Very Well-Known Member

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    We would shoot 20 or so every year in the high country sheep station we lived on
    Nasty horrible animals
    Nearly as bad as feral cats
     
  14. moosenoose

    moosenoose Legendary

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    They're pretty bad in North West Vic and understandably just as bad the further north (warmer) you go.

    There have been reports that farmers "Guardian" alpacas weighing in at 60kgs are getting taken out by feral dog packs. Just imagine for a minute if that was someones kid. Reports again that even farmers do not go out at night on their properties unless armed due to the risk of feral dog attack.

    Feral species populations in Australia are progressively getting worse. About time the government teamed up with hunting groups & Sporting shooters to allow members to target these "hot spots" where usually shooters cannot go.

    Have a pre-hunt briefing for the group. Get warning signs up for the public & a public awareness campaign running & get on with it. No doubt we'll then have all the screaming animals rights extremists blockading the areas or running through shooting zones in teddy-bear onesies waving "Save the dogs" banners.

    Don't even get me started on the feral cat issues. Bloody things!
     
  15. marcus0002

    marcus0002 Guest

    I'm a member of a group in QLD that is exactly that. Look up conservation and wildlife management Queensland on google. There is probably something similar in vic.

    - - - Updated - - -

    I'm a member of a group in QLD that is exactly that. Look up conservation and wildlife management Queensland on google. There is probably something similar in vic.
     
  16. champagne

    champagne Well-Known Member

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    what is to be expected? You fill a property with domesticated animals that have no idea when it comes to predators and expect the predators not to get out of control... Same goes for roos they are built for boom or bust, so droughts use to control the population but now we put in all these water sources and don't know why the population explodes? what really sh*** me is the price of radio collars for your hunting dogs these days are quiet cheap and reliable, so why not use them?
     
  17. moosenoose

    moosenoose Legendary

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    I think that's the "Farmer Assist" program yeah? They're proposing to put Victoria into it. It's certainly up & running in QLD ;) Bloody good idea I reckon.

    SSAA Farmer Assist Program | SSAA Farmer Assist
     
  18. -Peter

    -Peter Guest

  19. marcus0002

    marcus0002 Guest

    Na that's another one. Farmer assist is only new and there is only 2 or 3 properties available at the present. It's more of a notice board linking farmers with hunters.

    CWM. http://cwm.ssaaqld.org.au/2013/ is a lot older and more established. It's more like a club you join and then go out on shoots they have organized with the land owner. The link above is for the qld one but each state has there own.
    It's $60 a year and you have to do a shooting test to show you can hit what you're aiming at and a training day where you learn safety, navigation and what they are all about.

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  20. kitten_pheonix

    kitten_pheonix Well-Known Member

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    It honestly looks like the bred traits in the dogs are dissapearing and they are going back to wolves.
    Which is not as dumb as it sounds.
    A short bit on the silver fox study in russia, they are breeding foxes based on traits such as seeks human company etc, in a few generations they start to get floppy ears, wag there tails, get more colours etc.
    It would only take a few generations for these wild dogs to go back to a close to wolf state. The grey one is really showing a wolf colour.
    (Beautiful but shouldnt be here)
     
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