Feral doves used to feed Oenpelli Pythons.

Discussion in 'Reptile News' started by GBWhite, Feb 20, 2016.

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  1. GBWhite

    GBWhite Well-Known Member

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  2. BrownHash

    BrownHash Well-Known Member

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    Interesting, although those doves aren't feral. They are Spotted Doves which are native Australian doves. They would've likely been introduced to Alice as it isn't part of their natural distribution.
     
  3. GBWhite

    GBWhite Well-Known Member

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    From what this indicates they are native to Asia and were introduced to Australia in the 1800's.

    http://www.birdsinbackyards.net/species/Streptopelia-chinensis
     
  4. BrownHash

    BrownHash Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, I stand corrected.

    I believe I've hit todays quota for learning something new each day.
     
  5. mikey_mike

    mikey_mike Active Member

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    Excellent article - thanks.
    they're feral spotted turtle doves. Asian imports. They became established in Alice relatively recently & presumably compete with the native crested pigeons & possible even the spinifex pigeons. Parks & Wildlife had an attempt at eradication & got close but a few landholders who have a soft spot for ferals wouldn't allow the shooting team onto their properties. Sadly parks & wildlife got close but then abandoned the effort & now theyre probably the most abundant pigeon in Alice.
    A bunch of locals trap the turtle doves & take them to the Wildlife Park to feed to their raptors.

    I've got two turtle doves in my freezer at the moment. Both are smaller than the first one I fed to my albino carpet python (which caused me great distress - see Help oversized prey item). I'm taking the advice of the respondents to that post & freezing them to reduce parasite burden. It's a win win situation for me. Fewer ferals, fewer rats being bred for food & one happy snake.
     
  6. Bluetongue1

    Bluetongue1 APS Veteran APS Veteran

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    I don’t think you have to worry about it competing with native pigeons in natural habitat. They are very much dependent on human disturbance for the weed seeds and bread etc they consume. The last line of the article referenced by George states: “The species has not spread far from urban areas, probably because of a lack of suitable food.”


    Just out of interest... Where I live in Perth, it was new area just opened up when built some twenty five years ago. Senegal Doves (another exotic) were common and the Spotted (Chinese) Turtledove wasn’t to be seen. As the surrounding area developed we began to get Spotted Doves (about 10 years ago I think). The two species co-existed for a while but the Spotteds were openly aggressive towards the Senegals. Have not seen a Senegal in more than five years now. So it would not surprise me if they drive native pigeons away in Alice. However, I have seen Crested Pigeons in Sydney in the same parkland habitat as Spotteds. Crested are one of the bird species that have expanded their natural range due to tree removal to develop grazing lands.
     
  7. ronhalling

    ronhalling Subscriber Subscriber

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    [MENTION=41842]Bluetongue1[/MENTION], It is exactly the same situation where i live in Port Macquarie, when i moved into this house 20 years ago the crested pigeon and white headed pigeon were prolific, but now we hardly see any, the most common now is the spotted dove and whoa betide any other type of dove/pigeon that tries to enter it's domain, feathers fly from any intruder silly enough to enter the spotted dove's territory. :) .....................Ron
     
  8. mikey_mike

    mikey_mike Active Member

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    I'm pretty sure that they compete with Cresteds (at least around Alice) - if for no other reason than I regularly catch Cresteds in my traps. Cresteds & turtledoves sometimes feed together. Both species seem to take a mixture of grass seeds & grain / pet food from humans. You're totally correct that turtledoves are confined to near Alice - but this doesn't mean that they rely exclusively on humans for food. (I havent actually researched this just personal observations). In Rockingham, WA the rock doves compete with seabirds for roosting sites in sandstone cliffs, so competition doesn't have to be for food. In Alice this could be benficial for the Cresteds as turtle doves also "compete" to become prey for raptors - a dilutional effect. All very interesting for ecology buffs, limited relevance to reptiles except that the Oenpelli Pythons now have a food source - yay. I'm going to keep trapping.
     
  9. Bluetongue1

    Bluetongue1 APS Veteran APS Veteran

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    @mikey_mike. I totally agree, which is why I qualified my first sentence with the rider “in natural habitat”. I don’t doubt within an urban landscape that Cresteds and Spotteds compete for certain common food resources. The fact that Cresteds have been able to invade and establish themselves in a city the size of Sydney says they are able to utilise a substantial variety of the seed resources available in urban areas. Crested pigeons are fairly good at driving off other species and I suspect that, depending on the particular situation, such as the range and degree of resources available, sometimes they hold their own against Spotted Doves and sometimes they don’t.

    The Rock Doves that you mention at Rockingham are still urban animals. They are competing with natives within the metropolitan area. This is true of other urban established invaders like the Common Myna, which competes with native birds.
     
  10. mikey_mike

    mikey_mike Active Member

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    Bluetongue we're most definitely in agreement, but urban areas have important ecological values also. Your local region is a case in point. Rock doves cause problems in the Shoal Water Is. Marine Park & also Carnac Is. (I'm a bit hazy about Carnac its been a few years now since I've visited) .Shoal Water would count as urban, don't think Carnac counts though. Anyway I hope you & other switched on people get to enjoy & protect these places - I miss the ocean.

    On a different note - can't wait to see an Oenpelli one day. Good work GB.
     
  11. Bluetongue1

    Bluetongue1 APS Veteran APS Veteran

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    @mikey_mike. I did not mean to give the wrong impression here. The point I wanted to make is the spread of Rock Doves and Spotted Turtle Doves is limited to urbanised areas and adjacent natural habitat within close flying distance. Where these ferals make use of important resources normally accessed by native animals, then control measures are absolutely appropriate, most especially areas of natural habitat adjacent urbanisation. Even within the heart of urban areas, I reckon some measure of on-going population control is warranted in many cases. So yeah, we are definitely on the same page in that respect.
     
  12. Wally

    Wally Subscriber Subscriber

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    That's better Blue... it seems you've replaced your ribbon. You were getting a little faint there. :)
     
  13. kingofnobbys

    kingofnobbys Suspended Banned

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    Why not use common pidgeons (the kind that are everywhere in cities) or indian minner birds. Both introduced, invasive, and pests, and displacing native birds and out competing them.
     
  14. Herpo

    Herpo Well-Known Member

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    Some states and suburbs give out traps for myna birds, and some feed those to their snakes.
     
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