Feral pet invasion across NSW

Discussion in 'Reptile News' started by Aussiepride83, Nov 9, 2017.

  1. Aussiepride83

    Aussiepride83 Very Well-Known Member

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  2. pinefamily

    pinefamily Subscriber Subscriber

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    Sounds like an April Fool's joke.
     
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  3. Smittiferous

    Smittiferous Subscriber Subscriber

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    I’m a little concerned about authorities urging the public to report sightings... That’s putting a hell of a lot of faith in the public’s ability to correctly identify these animals, and we are all aware of the common response to snakes and the like...
     
  4. Pauls_Pythons

    Pauls_Pythons Subscriber Subscriber Power Seller

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    I don't see how these animals can be brought back into control without the assistance of the public if ever at all.
    If things are this bad in NSW it's almost at a stage where they will need to employ an army of licensed 'bounty hunters' similar to what has been done in Florida.
    Either way the impact on native wildlife will be catastrophic regardless
     
  5. Buggster

    Buggster Active Member

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    I thought Indian Ringneck parrots could be kept as pets without license?

    Regardless i’d be a bit dubious with some of these reported ‘sightings’. Most people will see a 2ft whip snake then turn around sprouting tales about the 9ft king brown that chased them for half a block.
     
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  6. Aussiepride83

    Aussiepride83 Very Well-Known Member

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    The authorities don't have much of a clue either... remember this story recently?
    http://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2015-...-constrictor-by-mistake-on-gold-coast/6374398

    And then...
    http://www.goldcoastbulletin.com.au...t/news-story/baf176859b5981a209f3778dedb784b4
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2017
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  7. pinefamily

    pinefamily Subscriber Subscriber

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    And not a mention of other feral pests such as cats, foxes, or rabbits. All of which cause as much damage.
     
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  8. GBWhite

    GBWhite Well-Known Member

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    Have no doubt that there are herp enthusiasts in Australian that have exotic vens such as (amongst other things) Cobras, Pit Vipers and Rattlers. I remember a few years back a snake relocater in Melbourne attending a residence to find a full grown adult Gaboon Viper in a garage that the residents thought was a Carpet.

    From what I've heard Corn Snakes turn up in Sydney and the outer suburbs on a very regular basis and there's no doubt in my mind that of all the exotic species of snakes in Australia at the moment they have the potential to establish themselves in the wild.

    Also seen pics of road killed Red-Tailed Boas south of Sydney.

    I remember being told of a an established colony of chameleons in Sydney's Lane Cove National Park about 20 years ago.

    Another snake that is creating some concern is the Flowerpot Snake (Ramphotyphlops braminus) which is parthenogenetic (all specimens are female) which has been reported in Nth Qld, Darwin and WA.

    But the reptile species of greatest concern is Red Eared Slider turtles.

    http://invasives.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/Biosecurity-failures-red-eared-slider-turtles.pdf

    https://www.agric.wa.gov.au/amphibians-and-reptiles/red-eared-slider-animal-pest-alert?page=0,2
     
  9. Aussiepride83

    Aussiepride83 Very Well-Known Member

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    Yes, RES are a huge problem considering the pressure Australia's native turtles are already under with more than half considered vulnerable/endangered.
     
  10. GBWhite

    GBWhite Well-Known Member

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    Yes Kev, I couldn't agree more. I presume you've heard about the situation here where I live regarding the Bellinger River Snapping Turtles (Myuchelys georgesi). It was a friend of mine that made the original discovery and contacted one of the other local herpers who then notified the authorities before filling me in.

    A couple of us attended one of the early meetings held here to try and identify the cause and commence a process to put recovery plan in place. The lead scientist (who, given his background, I believe should have known better) and a few of the idiots from the local environmental groups up here were trying to make out that it had to with the river's water quality. It's actually since been tested and proven to be one of, if not, the most pristine water systems in NSW. We put it to them how the symptoms were very consistent with and present as a Ranavirus and sighted evidence of almost identical mass die off events with frogs and turtles overseas. Even mentioned about how Red Eared Sliders and Eastern Box Turtles (as well as other species) were known to be hosts and suggested that they should include these, or at least RES, as a possible consideration as contributing to the cause of it being introduced into our river but hey.....they didn't want to know about it.

    Since then it's been identified as a "new" iridovirus (ranavirus happens to be is a genus of the family iridoviridae) and labelled the Bellinger River Virus. Hello!!!

    Now we've been informed that it's not important to identify the cause but to concentrate on the recovery plan. Go figure?
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2017
  11. SpottedPythons

    SpottedPythons Well-Known Member

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    I used to keep RES (in another country, of course) and I can tell you, they are bloody hardy! They can literally survive anywhere, and I've seen specimens that haven't ever had access to UVB, but grow perfectly healthy. They are the perfect turtle to invade... :(
     

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