First time handling

Discussion in 'Australian Snakes' started by Kirk1701, Feb 25, 2018.

  1. Kirk1701

    Kirk1701 Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2017
    Messages:
    135
    Likes Received:
    115
    Gender:
    Female
    As you might know I picked up my spotted python a week ago - so today was my first time handling him. I think it went pretty well, he went into strike pose a couple of times and struck once (but without actually biting). After a minute or two he settled, then just used my hands like a climbing frame. He also kept kinda rubbing his head against my fingers (maybe he's going into shed?). All up I probably handled him for 5 minutes.

    So now do I try and handle him for a few minutes most days? Except obviously for the day he feeds and the few days after that, and if he is in shed.

    He did reject his food on Thursday, but I'm not overly worried about that. He's been out and about more the past 2 days and seems to be comfortable in his environment.
     
    pinefamily likes this.
  2. Stompsy

    Stompsy Subscriber Subscriber

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,670
    Likes Received:
    1,015
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Melbourne
    I’d only handle once or twice a week.

    And I’d focus on getting him to feed before worrying too much about getting him used to handling.
     
  3. Kirk1701

    Kirk1701 Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2017
    Messages:
    135
    Likes Received:
    115
    Gender:
    Female
    Any tips for feeding? He seemed vaguely interested last time, he came up and seemed to be scenting the mouse then struck once - seemed to hit the mouse but didn't bite and constrict. Then he lost interest and went back into his hide - I didn't push the issue.
     
  4. Foozil

    Foozil Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2017
    Messages:
    711
    Likes Received:
    505
    Gender:
    Male
    Get him excited - rub the mouse all over his body, jiggle it a lot and maybe even tear its nose a bit to make it smell a bit more. Also, make sure the mouse is warm, I usually thaw mine out in hot water to make sure of this.
     
  5. Stompsy

    Stompsy Subscriber Subscriber

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,670
    Likes Received:
    1,015
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Melbourne
    In my experience, when they strike but don’t hold on it’s defensive. He may not feel comfortable eating when he can see a human waiting to eat him.

    To begin with I’d leave the prey item in the enclosure overnight to see if he’ll take it when you’re not around. Failing that, you could brain the mouse (poke small holes in its head to stimulate bleeding) as the smell of blood is sometimes enticing enough to make them eat.

    If that doesn’t work, then I find tapping the mouse on the tail end of the snake will sometimes make them whip around and grab hold.
     
  6. Kirk1701

    Kirk1701 Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2017
    Messages:
    135
    Likes Received:
    115
    Gender:
    Female
    So all that movement won't freak him out?

    Is it too soon to try again tonight? He was meant to feed Thursday - but I would actually like to feed on a different day, Thursdays aren't convenient because I have roller derby training till 9
    --- Automatic Post Merged, Feb 26, 2018, Original Post Date: Feb 26, 2018 ---
    I thought they would only eat the prey if it was warm? How do you ensure it remains warm overnight?
     
  7. Foozil

    Foozil Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2017
    Messages:
    711
    Likes Received:
    505
    Gender:
    Male
    It shouldn't. The aim isn't to annoy him, only to get him excited so don't violently thrash it around or anything.
    I would wait at least a week before trying to feed him again.
     
  8. Stompsy

    Stompsy Subscriber Subscriber

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,670
    Likes Received:
    1,015
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Melbourne
    I’d leave him for a few nights and try again, just to ensure he settles after the first try.

    You would warm/defrost the mouse as normal and then just place it in the enclosure. It will stay warm enough for him to eat it but ensure you remove it in the morning if he hasn’t as it won’t keep for too long. Unless the enclosure is freezing, it will be fine at room temp.
     
    dragonlover1 and pinefamily like this.
  9. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2017
    Messages:
    1,636
    Likes Received:
    1,080
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    QLD
    Make sure it's warm enough, thawing in a glass of warm tapwater hasn't failed me yet, only offer food after dusk.
     
  10. Kirk1701

    Kirk1701 Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2017
    Messages:
    135
    Likes Received:
    115
    Gender:
    Female
    Thanks guys, will try again on Wednesday
    --- Automatic Post Merged, Feb 28, 2018, Original Post Date: Feb 26, 2018 ---
    Thankyou so much for this advice. I left a defrosted mouse in his enclosure last night and its gone this morning, I'm pretty sure I could hear him come get it about 5 minutes after I turned the lights off.
     
  11. Stompsy

    Stompsy Subscriber Subscriber

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,670
    Likes Received:
    1,015
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Wonderful. :)
     
  12. Kirk1701

    Kirk1701 Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2017
    Messages:
    135
    Likes Received:
    115
    Gender:
    Female
    Is it normal for him to hide himself away after a meal? I didn’t spot him out an about last night at all (i tend to at least get a glimpse of him). He’s been in his warm hide since feeding (as far as I can tell anyways, I don’t know if he comes out while I’m at work).

    I figured he’s probably just digesting but wanted to check.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  13. Bl69aze

    Bl69aze Very Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2017
    Messages:
    1,064
    Likes Received:
    650
    Gender:
    Male
    Yes
    It also can means they’re “scared” like someone coming out of their room for food then running back to their room and closing the door
     
  14. Kirk1701

    Kirk1701 Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2017
    Messages:
    135
    Likes Received:
    115
    Gender:
    Female
    Cool thanks. I don't think he is scared, I spotted him just before I raced off to work. He stuck his head out of the hide as I walked into the room, regarded me for a few moments before laying his head down sticking out of the hide. Didn't appear to be overly bothered by my presence or like he needed to hide away, he seemed pretty chill.
     
    dragonlover1 likes this.
  15. Scutellatus

    Scutellatus Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2017
    Messages:
    901
    Likes Received:
    1,085
    Gender:
    Male
    It is definitely not scared. If that was the case it most probably wouldn't have eaten.
    Hiding after a meal is natural instinct. They are fat and heavy once fed and can't slither away at speed to find cover, the only option is to regurgitate to regain their agility, hiding is a much better option.
     
    dragonlover1 and Snapped like this.
  16. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2017
    Messages:
    1,636
    Likes Received:
    1,080
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    QLD
    Your python is nocturnal, completely normal to hide away during the day. I only ever seen mine actively moving in the daylight hours to grab a drink of water, change hides due to temp preference or because they've soiled their enclosure and are looking for a clean spot to coil up. Sometimes shedding too but for the most part it's completely normal to be hidden away and inactive during the daylight hours and especially after a feed... snakes switch to digestion mode and they basically ramp up their metabolic rate in the engine room to get that meal processed as quickly as possible. No need to be out exploring the neighbourhood with a full belly, it makes them vulnerable.
     
  17. Bl69aze

    Bl69aze Very Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2017
    Messages:
    1,064
    Likes Received:
    650
    Gender:
    Male
    I read it as, took it back to its hide to eat rather then eat where it’s been fed
     
  18. Kirk1701

    Kirk1701 Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2017
    Messages:
    135
    Likes Received:
    115
    Gender:
    Female
  19. Snapped

    Snapped Subscriber Subscriber

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2012
    Messages:
    833
    Likes Received:
    258
    Location:
    Australia
    Ooh, exciting isn't it? How did it go?
     
  20. Kirk1701

    Kirk1701 Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2017
    Messages:
    135
    Likes Received:
    115
    Gender:
    Female
    Pretty good, he went into a bit of a strike pose when I took a photo of him (hence why I only got one pic) but generally seemed pretty content to chill around my wrist.
    --- Automatic Post Merged, Mar 7, 2018, Original Post Date: Mar 6, 2018 ---
    He took his second feed with me last night, as last time I left the mouse in the enclosure overnight. I was a bit concerned as he hadn't been out an about as much but the mouse was gone this morning.
     

Share This Page