For the APS fishos, my first marlin of port stephens.

Discussion in 'Chit Chat' started by Venomous1111, Mar 11, 2013.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. dangles

    dangles Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2010
    Messages:
    984
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Crimebrook
    Nice catch, theres been an abundance of small ( to 100kgs) marlin of all variety caught within 5 kms of land this year. 1 young angler I know reeled in 3 in 2 hours then others on same boat pulled another 2. Only fish kept was the young blokes first.


    A 1m plus kingie is the mark im chasing
     
  2. Ramsayi

    Ramsayi Very Well-Known Member APS Veteran

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2003
    Messages:
    4,788
    Likes Received:
    73
    Location:
    Sydney
    Bit of an over reaction don't you think? Didn't read any hate as such just a few people who have a different opinion.I've caught a few marlin over the years and have always tagged and released as I couldn't bring myself to killing such an impressive beast.
     
  3. reb01

    reb01 Suspended Banned

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2012
    Messages:
    239
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Port Stephens NSW
    There were quiet a few caught over this weekend...The amount of expensive game boats was mindblowing..Top catch venomous1111 ...
     
  4. Venomous1111

    Venomous1111 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2012
    Messages:
    586
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Sydney
    Cheers mate. I'm also chasing the 1m plus king. My pb is 91cm jigging at 12 mile of Sydney. Hopefully heading over to NZ at the end of the year to hit up a charter with nomad or enchanter to hit either three kings or the ranfurly banks to chase some serious kings, hapuka and bass.
     
  5. dangles

    dangles Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2010
    Messages:
    984
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Crimebrook
    My pb is 87 inside middle harbour on live squid. Would like to hit the 1m mark in nsw. NZ is cheating!!!!!!!!!
     
  6. Venomous1111

    Venomous1111 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2012
    Messages:
    586
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Sydney
    If only we got 30kg+ kings regularly here in Sydney.
     
  7. Wing_Nut

    Wing_Nut Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2012
    Messages:
    310
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    WA
    I have researched the commercial fishing in my area as well as donated considerable time and resources to assisting fisheries in research initiatives to help develop a better understanding of my local fishery as well as others in Western Australia. I have fished in almost every part of Australia as a recreational fisher, as well as limited involvement in commercial fishing. I am a avid sports fisher, and I advocate recreational fishing. I have involved myself in the political side of fisheries management.

    I am not 'hating' on Venomous for keeping his first marlin. That would be a total waste of my time and energy. I advocate catch and release on a great many species. The information that lead to the ban on commercial fishing of marlin species indicated a serious decline in the populations of those species and was also a turning point in game fishing in Australia that lead to the general consensus that the marlin species should be caught and released.

    Striped marlin are one of the fastest growing of the marlin species and if this was an isolated case then you could quite well be correct in your statement that one fish has no real effect on the population as a whole. If Australia wide all fishers kept there first marlin then it would have a negative effect on the species as a whole.

    Even over the last 15 years there has been a marked decline in the number of marlin caught in fishing competitions and research. In the mid 90's the top boats would often tag and release triple what they record now.

    This capture was a good first fish and a reward for an obvious dedicated effort. I am not taking away from that. I simply advocate catch and release of this species.

    Regards

    Wing_Nut
     
  8. Mojo_3

    Mojo_3 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2011
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    Maybe stating "haters" was an overreaction, I can accept that reading back through the posts I see that there a some valid points and opinions, I guess that they are just that. I have done my fair share of research, tag and release,time on long lineres as a spectator and also agree that they are an "impressive beast" Ive seen plenty of Black and Blue marlin come up on a long line that are dead and cut off to sink to the bottom, Divide that by how many commercial boats are out there. Commercial fishers are the ones who are obviously raping the ocean for what its worth, Not recreational fisherman. It was just my opinion that if you are to put in the dedicated time, effort and do happen to get the reward then it really is your decision... I kept my first, and tagged plenty after that,and I will continue to tag.
     
  9. Magpie

    Magpie Almost Legendary

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2003
    Messages:
    5,954
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Canadia
    So how many people in Australia you reckon catch their first stripey in a year? 1000?
    If the fishery is that fragile that taking 1000 fish out of it a year is going to cause problems, the fishery should be totally shut down, not even C&R allowed. Even the best C&R practise has some mortality associated.
     
  10. Wing_Nut

    Wing_Nut Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2012
    Messages:
    310
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    WA
    There is no complete data recorded on this. It is estimated in NSW the recreation harvest of Stripped Marlin is could be as high as 45t annually. Game fishing associations record around 1000 tag and release fish annually in NSW of which research indicates less than a 10% mortality rate. The Australian national total for Recreational harvest is estimated at 200t. Approximately one third of this catch would be expected to be females of breeding size. Given that the species is targeted in well policed and protected waters (legally), these have become a sanctuary for the fish and a buffer against international fishing pressures in the region. The catch and release policy that most anglers have adopted has taken these factors into consideration.

    Furthermore, a single female at breeding size can produce between 11 and 29 million eggs annually. The date available indicates the population of the Striped Marlin on the east coast of Australia is very isolated from the other populations from around the globe. The worlds second largest larval distribution area also exist here. The distributions off the east coast of Australia are strongly influenced by the intersection of two major current systems, the warm and nutrient-poor western Pacific circulation and the colder nutrient rich water of the West Wind Drift. This creates idea conditions for the Striped Marlin to breed.

    The removal of 500-1000 adult fish from the fishery has a significant impact on the recovery of this species. This species had been seriously over fished through the latter part of the last century and through a conservation effort and legislation has made positive recovery. Striped marlin appear not to show a great degree of sexual dimorphism, with both sexes tending to grow to about the same size so it is difficult to practice any selective harvesting.

    While it may seem that harvesting that number of fish from the fishery is insignificant, every bit does go to a more complete recovery of the species. Also taking into consideration the high levels of heavy metals many of these fish carry once they reach adult size, it seems wasteful to harvest them at all.

    The legislation allows for fishers to take one fish in their bag limit, and I do not deny anyone that right. I advocate catch and release for this species, but the onus is on each person to do what they feel is right. Given the full story most recreational fishers adopt a catch and release policy.

    Regards

    Wing_Nut
     
  11. champagne

    champagne Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2013
    Messages:
    600
    Likes Received:
    2
    There is no complete data recorded on this. I think you that answers the question..... no one knows for sure, but we will tell you that its the recreational fishers causing the problems.
     
  12. moosenoose

    moosenoose Legendary

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2003
    Messages:
    11,003
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    It'd still be getting stuffed and mounted behind the bar if I caught it :lol:
     
  13. Wing_Nut

    Wing_Nut Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2012
    Messages:
    310
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    WA
    This just shows a complete lack of understanding of the processes involved in recording physical data of pelagic fish species.

    Yes, it is fact that recreational fishing contributed to the decline of this species.

    Regards

    Wing_Nut
     
  14. hugsta

    hugsta Almost Legendary

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2003
    Messages:
    5,386
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    SYDNEY
    I support catch and release, by why can't people just admire a guys first catch and say 'grats mate, nice fish'. Most people I know have kept their first Marlin and a lot have also let them go. At the end of the day, there is no law broken, we all have the right to take a feed of fish so why can't people just leave it at that. So many people put up pics on FB about their first catch, be it a large barra or snapper and how they kept it and the same old crappy arguement comes up everytime. I kept my first marlin, it hangs on my wall, I tagged everyone after that. it was my choice and I'd do it again everytime. Oh, and Marlin tastes great, I've eaten heaps of it, mako sharks are pretty good as well. :D:D

    Daz
     
  15. champagne

    champagne Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2013
    Messages:
    600
    Likes Received:
    2
    what physical data???? your own words "There is no complete data recorded on this" also ''It is estimated in NSW the recreation harvest of Stripped Marlin is could be as high as 45t annually.'' Estimate and could be as high as also doesn't sound like physical data
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2013
  16. Wing_Nut

    Wing_Nut Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2012
    Messages:
    310
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    WA
    There is no complete data recorded, this is very different from no physical data. There is a huge range of logistical difficulties to overcome to gain a complete data record, however, there is a lot of scientific data that can be extrapolated to give a reasonably accurate insight. Much like any field data, it is never entirely complete however once interpreted it provides an understanding of the bigger picture. Don Bromhead and Julian Pepperell published a very detailed paper on this issue if you would like to see some of the physical data I am basing my opinions on. There are also studies done by the NSW government that add important physical data to the picture.

    Estimations I quoted were based on physical data taken in survey by I&I NSW.

    Feel free to investigate any of published documentation to gain a clearer understanding of the complexities of the physical data that has been obtained and the deductions that have been made from this.

    You are correct in saying that the research is not complete, I do not deny this, however applying that way of thinking to all field data would undermine the entire scientific knowledge base.

    I do not deny anyone the right to make a choice, the fishery belongs equally to all of us as a shared resource and it is well within each persons right to take there legal limits from the fishery. My views will hopefully share a greater understanding of the bleak future that many fish species face, and encourage people to make decisions with a clearer understanding of the big picture. I do not lay blame at the decline of fish stocks solely on recreational fishers, simply challenge them to make decisions for a long term sustainable fishery.


    Regards

    Wing_Nut
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page