Found in garden and still damp.

Discussion in 'Reptile and Amphibian Identification' started by krunchynutt, Dec 7, 2018.

  1. krunchynutt

    krunchynutt New Member

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    I thinks it's an Eastern brown but i am no expert.

    May have to keep dog in

    IMG_20181207_183952.jpg
     
  2. Sdaji

    Sdaji Almost Legendary

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    Impossible to tell from this picture alone. It does look like an elapid.

    What will help is a location and close up pictures of useful diagnostic features. These can be found on the upper and lower sides of the head, and the underside of the tail including the vent. Counting the scale rows at midbody will also help. With all of these it will be easy to identify. With some of them it may be anything from easy to impossible, depending on location and what it is.
     
  3. cris

    cris Almost Legendary

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    I would go with that assumption. Where are you in Australia? there are a few critters with similar scale counts, but none are good for pet dogs.
     
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  4. krunchynutt

    krunchynutt New Member

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    Its in Greenbank QLD. Next to a big pond with bush and trees.

    IMG_20181207_183952.jpg
     
  5. krunchynutt

    krunchynutt New Member

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    Thanks for replies. Pretty certain it's a brown now.
     
  6. Sdaji

    Sdaji Almost Legendary

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    Post a picture of the underside of the tail.
     
  7. Sdaji

    Sdaji Almost Legendary

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    I am guessing it's likely a Red-bellied Black Snake, from the pictures I'm guessing the head isn't available, but the subcaudals on the underside of the tail should be sufficient to confirm one way or the other.

    Not that it particularly matters in this case, but 'identifications' from people who clearly don't know what they're talking about often do more harm than good.
     
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  8. krunchynutt

    krunchynutt New Member

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    Sorry for delay. More pics attached

    20181207_191326.jpg

    20181207_191255.jpg
     
  9. Sdaji

    Sdaji Almost Legendary

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    Need the entire tail, most important is the area post posterior (away from the head) of the cloaca (vent/bum). If you have the head it will be quite easy.
     
  10. Bluetongue1

    Bluetongue1 APS Veteran APS Veteran

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    Going on the scale count alone, it could also be a Brown Tree Snake, which do not represent a danger to dogs, have divided caudals and are found in the area. One can count 15 dorsal scale rows. If that were the actual number (which is very unlikely), then there are a number of not particularly dangerous smaller elapids, and even some Green Tree Snakes, that fit the count.

    And I am pretty certain you are wrong. On what evidence do you base your ID? [Refer sticky post No. 1] It is most likely to be a Red-bellied Black. Although there is no absolute measure to compare size by, the rush leaves in the photo would indicate a sizeable snake. The degree of dark pigment in the dorsal scales, in stark contrast to the pigment-free skin between them, is typical of a RBB and not of EB’s. The partially pigmented lower lateral line of scales is also typical of a RBB and not an EB. There is no evidence of brown/ orange streaks present on the ventral scales of EB’s. However some EB’s have light markings and not all of the venter may be marked. EB’s have roughly circular proportioned dorsal scales, whereas in RBB’s they tend to be elongated and shield-shaped. A big pond and bush nearby would provide ideal habitat for RBB’s, making it likely they occur there.

    PS: Apologies for the delay in posting
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2019
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