Frog is 'hoppy' to be home

Discussion in 'Other Australian Reptiles and Amphibians' started by Flaviemys purvisi, Jan 8, 2019.

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  1. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    By GEORGIA SIMPSON
    4th Jan 2019

    b881741672z1_20190102134542_000g3d1cd7034-0-l5mw9il9fpfiu31akr2_ct677x380.jpg
    MIRACULOUS: This little White-Lipped Green Tree Frog, has made a full recovery after spending two months at the Frog Hospital. Picture: Contributed


    EIGHT weeks ago, a tiny green frog, had an unfortunate run in with a backyard whipper snipper.

    Although the frog didn't receive the kiss it needed to turn into a prince, it did receive lifesaving care from Frog Safe, a specialised frog hospital in Mission Beach.

    Frog Safe president Deborah Pergolotti said the amphibian presented injuries so severe, internal organs were protruding from its body.
    b881741672z1_20190102134654_000g3d1cd7002-0-69q1qlvcgd2xib1akr2_t460.jpg
    INJURIES: The little frog sustained horrific injuries after it fell victim to a whipper snipper. Picture: Contributed


    "The frog responded really well to treatment, and it took about four or five weeks for it to be recover. It took another three weeks to organise transport to get it home," she said.

    Wildlife carer Kylee Gray, released the frog back into the wild.

    "We took it back to where it came from, and found a safe spot to release it, so it knew its way around,"
    she said.

    Ms Pergolotti said it was likely the frog was sick when it became injured, as frogs were normally hidden during the day.

    "If it's sitting out in an open area during the day, there is something wrong with it, no matter what it looks like," she said.

    "A lot of frogs are ill with diseases that haven't been catalogued before like different types of cancers and flesh-eating disorders, and they can all be traced back to chemical use."

    Ms Pergolotti said since the use of a chemical known as neonicotinoids started in the area, injured frogs were being replaced with diseased ones.

    "Frogs never had these sorts of problems until neonicotinoids hit the market," she said.
     
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