Getting appropriate amount of UVB...

Discussion in 'Australian Lizards and Monitors' started by sebii, Mar 25, 2016.

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  1. sebii

    sebii Not so new Member

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    Hey all,

    I'm just trying to get the right amount of UVB to a trio of Coastal Ringtailed Geckos I recently purchased, and I'm a bit concerned that my current setup isn't getting the right amount of UVB to them. I currently have two 25w 5.0 UVB compact fluoros in a hood on top of the terrarium, but the light is having to penetrate steel mesh on the top, and the terrarium is 60cm tall. I'm not sure what the penetration would be, even with the reflectors, so I'm wondering if this is enough for them?

    If not, does anyone have any guides or tips as to how I might mount a fluoro inside the tank? It does have a cord port on the side, but I can't think of the best way to mount the thing.

    Cheers,
    Seb
     
  2. Iguana

    Iguana Well-Known Member

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    2 globes sounds like a bit much, but I can't say for sure without the entire enclosure dimensions. They however would produce a lot of light, which gecko's generally don't like, so it may be worth removing one to keep it as a spare.
    A fair amount of UV will continue to go through the steel mesh, especially since you have two globes, so I wouldn't be too worried about it. But it's a good idea to wait and see what others think before changing your setup as it's ideal to get many different facts and opinions.
     
  3. sebii

    sebii Not so new Member

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    Well it certainly looks like enough. Getting down to the maths of it though, it looks less promising.

    http://www.uvguide.co.uk/fluorescenttubemeshtests.htm

    With a likely 20% decrease from the mesh, both together wouldn't be producing anything close to even half daylight at distances greater than 12 inches. That doesn't matter if it's enough for this species, as from what I've read and heard from the previous owner, a good amount of UVB is massively important for Ring-tailed Geckos. I wonder if anyone has had experience with these before?
     
  4. kingofnobbys

    kingofnobbys Suspended Banned

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    Anyone with basic maths skills can get a handle on exactly how much UV will be blocked by a screen (flyscreen or wire) if you know the wire size, and the mesh spacing, simply calculate the area (no mesh) and the area of the shadow cast by the wire grid, you will have amount of uv blocked as a percentage.

    Some better brands of uv cfbs provide data on the uva and uvb flux at different distances , is easy to work out uva and uvb flux passed through the screen/mesh.
     
  5. pinefamily

    pinefamily Subscriber Subscriber

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    Simple answer is it is not enough UV through the mesh; no maths required :). Mesh tops are tricky, but not impossible to fit lighting to. I don't know much about these geckos; are they terrestrial or arboreal?
     
  6. sebii

    sebii Not so new Member

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    [MENTION=38465]pinefamily[/MENTION]

    Geckodan lists them as a mixed species as far as the type of setup to have for them. They are known to live on granite boulders. It's also interesting that in the charts provided, the fall off is rapid, so after 12 inches, the difference is insignificant. Any ideas or experience for mounting inside a terrarium? I wonder how others deal with this. There's not really even any solid data as to how much they need which is tricky. :)
     
  7. pinefamily

    pinefamily Subscriber Subscriber

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    The reason I asked about their nature relates to mounting the fittings inside the enclosure. What we have done with a mesh top enclosure for our red ackie is to have a hole in the mesh just wide enough for the screw section of an E27 fitting to fit in.
    This is the sort of thing I mean. http://www.reptilecity.com.au/apps/webstore/products/show/4321338
    Unless you are a sparkie or similar, you should get a professional to fit it for you. If you are worried about the amount of UV, you can build up the area underneath with rocks or branches. And without knowing the dimensions of your enclosure, I reckon one UV globe will be enough.
     
  8. kingofnobbys

    kingofnobbys Suspended Banned

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    True, very easy to fit a nice solid support (piece 15mm plywood say) under the screen and either hang a nanohood (for instance - only need 2 screws) or a reflector dome pendulum style (only need a c-clamp screw ie Grafco C Clamp Screw Compressor or a couple of Steel Screw Hooks and a camble tie) under mesh.
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2016
  9. sebii

    sebii Not so new Member

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    Thanks for your help fellas and/or ladies.
     
  10. alichamp

    alichamp Active Member

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    I was getting advice about this the other day at the reptile shop because I needed a new uv globe for my bluey.

    This is a common setup with beardies who like to climb, to put in the enclosure nice tall rocks for them to climb up and bask, and so they suggest the 5.0 25w cos beardies sit close up to the uv. For my bluey, I use the 10.0 25watt globe because his basking rock is not that high up in the enclosure and further than 15cm down from the globe. No idea if/how this would relate to your geckos, but thought I would share in case it does :)
     
  11. GBWhite

    GBWhite Well-Known Member

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    Hi Seb,

    Mate, I wouldn't worry about the fact that the UVB is being filtered.

    They're geckos and as such nocturnal so therefore they don't require high amounts of UVB in the first place and don't like bright lights. Some keepers don't even worrying about providing any at all. Others who do provide background UVB believe that minimal exposure improves fertility and is beneficial to their health.

    Their skin is sensitive to UVB light and this allows low exposure to UVB to produce large amounts of Vitamin D. The correct diet should provide all the vitamin D they need but brief exposure to low levels of UVB (at dawn and dusk) might be beneficial where a diet lacks vitamin D. Alternatively over exposure to UVB in geckos with a diet sufficient in vit D might increase the risk of vit D overdose.

    Cheers,

    George.
     
  12. alichamp

    alichamp Active Member

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    Haha I did wonder whether they are nocturnal
     
  13. sebii

    sebii Not so new Member

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    That is true of just about every species, but Ring-tailed Geckos need UVB — at least according to the keeper I got them from and the gecko bible. I think they are prone to some bone disease and floppy tail syndrome.
     
  14. GBWhite

    GBWhite Well-Known Member

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    It's called Metabolic Bone Disease (MBD) and it is a result of calcium deficiency and/or an imbalance in the ratio of calcium and phosphorus absorbed. Vit D (also known as the sunshine vitamin) aids in enhancing the intestinal absorption of both as well as other minerals.

    Read my third paragraph again. I didn't say not to provide any only to be conscious about their diet and just how much UVB they are exposed to.

    George.
     
  15. pinefamily

    pinefamily Subscriber Subscriber

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    [MENTION=42155]alichamp[/MENTION], the reptile shop has given you bad advice. All desert species should have 10.0 UV, others 5. It has nothing to do with how far away they are from it, except as long as they are within the acceptable range. Not sure with blueys, as they have such a wide natural range in the wild.
     
  16. kingofnobbys

    kingofnobbys Suspended Banned

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    Easterns BTS 5% uvb.

    - - - Updated - - -

    This is the output from a UVB200 26W CFB, I wouldn't recommend other 26W 10% UVB CFBs sold locally.
    [​IMG]
     
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