Green tree frog enclosure

Discussion in 'General Reptile Discussion' started by Shaughan, Jul 2, 2020.

  1. Shaughan

    Shaughan Not so new Member

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2020
    Messages:
    66
    Likes Received:
    23
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Sydney
    Hi all I just got some green tree frogs I want to put them in the best enclosure I can any help or photos of set up will be 100% helpful

    The cage/ tank i have is a 600w/450d/670h
    Running filter and a heater conditioning water now
     
    Ryan-James likes this.
  2. Ryan-James

    Ryan-James Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2015
    Messages:
    127
    Likes Received:
    27
    Hey mate,
    Ive been line breeding amphibians for some time and recently went through the "I'm going to build the perfect display enclosure" phase.
    There's several ways to go about this, the most popular set ups seem to be - bare tank h which is a water bowl, hide or structure and no sub.
    Bio active - which is self explanatory but it seems some ppl have some funny ideas on what they think this consists of.
    Then there is what I call a bioactive replicate, yeah it has substrate, only fake plants, structure, hides etc but must be pulled apart regularly to sanitize it, sub changed regularly etc.

    I assume your talking about whites or common green tree frogs, either way most of the Australian tree frog species (Litoria) aren't wet frogs at all and the constant humidity from paludarium style enclosures, heated water or running water all generate humidity and lead to problems like fungal infections, red leg and respiratory issues etc or generally much shorter life span.
    Make sure you have decent ventilation in your enclosure and having a tap installed at the bottom makes life easier.

    Anyhow you have a really good sized enclosure to start with so there's plenty of room to set up what you want, have a good think about substrate type and size as it will be ingested and can lead to impaction problems the other side is a lot of subs will stick to frogs and end up in the water, stuck to the side of the tank.
    I really recommend using an appropriate sized water bowl that can be physically removed and cleaned daily as opposed to part water or paludarium set up.
    I keep all my adult breeders in bioactive vivariums, I put them into a "rain chamber" for short periods during summer storm season to spawn.
    My taddies are raised in large tanks and young frogs are grown on in large storage containers with screened tops, these are bare except for a length of PVC pipe and water bowl.
    Ive been having issues loading any pics at all to this forum, this is a big win for me to get this one up here.
    This houses young whites tree frogs which I intend to breed from next year.
    IMG_20200607_165618.jpg
    For ease of maintenance I recommend either bare tank or a proper bio active with springtails, isopods etc. If you go the Bio set up do it properly with drainage layer, make a substrate mix to suit the plants and moisture levels you intend to have, use activated charcoal in the build and absolute minimum 4-6 week cycling period, 3 months is better imo, this way the frogs go into a viv that is pumping, plants are growing, micro fauna flourishing and you have worked out all the kinks, moisture levels etc.
    Nothing worse than building a beautiful viv and then have it turn into a rotting soggy mess whilst still trying to maintain frogs in it.
    Good luck with it, we definitely need more breeders, especially those committed to developing morphs, colours and patterns not seen in the wild.
    The layout and design for tree frogs, best approach is to treat it like jungle gym, lots of climbing and sitting areas, horizontally orientated branches etc
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2020
    cagey likes this.

Share This Page