Green tree python questions

Discussion in 'Australian Snakes' started by Madmick149, Nov 3, 2014.

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  1. Madmick149

    Madmick149 Not so new Member

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    Ok I'm thinking about my next python I have a Stimson and a albino Darwin and now looking at the next one and been thinking about a GTP.
    Iv been getting some conflicting info on temperament and enclosure size. Iv been told they have a nasty attitude but also been told they are very palsied and the bad attitude is a myth or caused by people yanking them off there perch.
    iv also been told that the enclosure dose not need to be so tall as they tend to climb across not up and down.
    GTP owners what is your experience with temperament and enclosure size?
     
  2. arevenant

    arevenant Well-Known Member

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    GTP's have very different requirements to most pythons.
    As a general rule, they are a look but don't touch python, though you do get the odd happy one. One thing you should consider is their teeth are a bit bigger than Morelia, so a bite will tingle a bit more.
    Also humidity is something that GTP's require that most pythons don't and its actually a pretty crucial part of its husbandry.
     
  3. GTPs are no more likely to bite than any other python. You risk a bite from any python at night when they are in feeding mode, and GTPs are no different in that respect. The reason they are a no-touch snake is that they are usually anchored to their perches and don't like to be removed from their branches - you can't just pick them up the way you do with other species, so if you want snakes you can handle regularly, GTPs are not a good choice. If you want to remove them from the enclosure, you'll need removable perches so that you can remove the snake & perch at the same time.

    Enclosure dimensions are pretty standard Morelia - a 900x600x600 or 1200x600x600 with overhead heat (panels are best) will be perfectly adequate. Because they spend 99%+ of their time on perches, they are unlikely to venture down to the lower levels at any time if they don't have to. You might risk dehydration if you have the enclosure so tall that they are far removed from their water bowl. I can count on one hand the number of times my GTPs have been on the floor of their enclosures in the last 8 or 9 years, so I would say that width of the enclosure is more important that height.

    Misting once or twice a week for adults, daily for a few days prior to shedding, and they'll be fine.

    Jamie
     
  4. solar 17

    solar 17 Guest

    Biak local GTP's it is a well known fact more often than not can be pretty ordinary in the personality dept. as opposed to Sorong local are "very" placid. lt is also fact that the unusual colourations in gtp's come from the Biak local but often ppl get more than they bargain for, l have a friend atm has just hatched out Biaks and are already fiesty little critters, Aussie gtp's can be good and some can be ordinary, mine will latch on to you anymore than 5 days after their last feed....just give them respect like any other animal. ~B~
     
  5. Madmick149

    Madmick149 Not so new Member

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    Thanks Jamie
    just trying to get the facts from people who own GTPs before I buy and not run in to problems. I'm building a new enclosure for my albino 1200x600x600 and going to be using a roof mounted heat panel and fluro UVB lighting even looking in to a back up ventilation fan on a thermostat should the temp get to high for some reason. I prefer to put it in and not need it then need it and not have it. Do things right and do it once and if it's worth doing its worth over doing.
     
  6. Waterrat

    Waterrat Almost Legendary

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    To the enclosure shape: Arboreal snakes "are meant" to climb. Vertical movement requires a lot more energy than traveling on the ground or on a horizontal branch - wild GTPs climb up and down on daily basis. It strengthens their muscles and aids their general body condition, the more they move, the less incidence of tail-hanging, rectal prolapse and constipation. I know; The Complete Chondro is the bible where Greg recommends standard size cages for GTPs, but don't forget, it was written 11 years ago. A bird kept in a small cage for a long time will not be able to fly when released and a GTP kept in a shallow cage will not be able to climb - JMO (sorry Jamie).
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2014
  7. BlueIris

    BlueIris New Member

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    Has anyone recommended that you buy the book 'The More Complete Chondro' by Greg Maxwell? It's honestly worth the $30 it costs for people who are interested and people are already own a GTP. For many months now I've been talking to reptile shop keepers, breeders and researching non stop about GTPs and they've all relatively based their enclosures around how Maxwell has setup his. Though you don't need to follow exactly what he does, it does work for many. I finally got my Sorong type last week from a breeder in SA and he helped me with how I should setup my enclosure. When I got mine, he was as sweet as a cookie as the breeder had mentioned. He loves sorongs because of their temperament. Personally, I chose a sorong because of temperament and colour, not because of reputation. If you're committed to buying another type that is a bit more feisty like a biak, at least you know what you're in for. I've heard aussie greens are quite nice though too.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Has anyone recommended that you buy the book 'The More Complete Chondro' by Greg Maxwell? It's honestly worth the $30 it costs for people who are interested and people are already own a GTP. For many months now I've been talking to reptile shop keepers, breeders and researching non stop about GTPs and they've all relatively based their enclosures around how Maxwell has setup his. Though you don't need to follow exactly what he does, it does work for many. I finally got my Sorong type last week from a breeder in SA and he helped me with how I should setup my enclosure. When I got mine, he was as sweet as a cookie as the breeder had mentioned. He loves sorongs because of their temperament. Personally, I chose a sorong because of temperament and colour, not because of reputation. If you're committed to buying another type that is a bit more feisty like a biak, at least you know what you're in for. I've heard aussie greens are quite nice though too.
     
  8. hellohello

    hellohello New Member

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    GTPs

    'The More Complete Chondro' by Greg Maxwell is a fantastic book, I read it cover to cover before purchasing a green tree python and it cleared any doubts you have about the breed.
    Greg's enthusiasm is contagious, you need to be more vigilant with GTPs compared to other breeds, but they are worth it.
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2015
  9. MrVic

    MrVic Active Member

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    Strange. I must have a freak of a snake. He's so placid. I can pick him up off his perch and hold him for ages. He wraps around my arm, neck or is happy to sit in a ball in your lap.
    Never bitten anyone according to the previous owner. I tried to pick him up a few days after his feed and he hissed at me. That was the only time that he's shown any aggression.
    He's an amazing animal. I can play with his head and he just moves away. No hissing, no carrying on.
    I'm new to GTP's and he's ultra awesome. My favourite snake without a doubt.
     
  10. The hissing isn't aggression, it's defensiveness because you were hassling it when it wanted to be left alone. I feel sorry for any reptile that ends up being a toy or plaything of keepers who attribute human sentiments to the reptiles in their care. GTPs are generally no more likely to bite than other species, but they don't enjoy being handled, even if they seem to tolerate it. Don't mistake "tolerate" for "enjoy" - the snake has no choice about whether you rip it off its perch and molest it, or leave it in peace.

    Jamie
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 21, 2015
  11. wokka

    wokka Guest

    Poking it every time it hisses you might "tame " it or break its spirit! I have seen stuffed toys that look a bit like GTPs. They may be a better option if you want to play with a snakes head!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 22, 2015
  12. Waterrat

    Waterrat Almost Legendary

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    Greg's book is fantastic, the most comprehensive information on GTPs ever compiled. Just keep in mind that the first book was published 12 years ago and many things have changed since (e.g. incubating temps, feeding rats, etc.). Whilst I don't knock keeping GTPs in standard cages as in Greg's book, I do believe that tall cages are beneficial to satisfy GTP's climbing habits. After all, they are Australia's most arboreal python .... to me, not providing enough height for arboreal snakes is like not providing enough floor space for terrestrial species. JMO

    cheers
    Michael

    PS. I totally agree with Jamie and Wokka about the handling issue. View attachment 313376
     
  13. MrVic

    MrVic Active Member

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    I've only had him for a month. He came from a friend who handled him every day. It hung out around her neck, in her lap, around her wrist etc.
    If I had wanted a toy, I would have bought a PS3 game.
    Hulk is handled every couple of days. Does the snake "reset" and go back to a traditional "snake attitude" with a change of ownership?
    Perhaps I should lock his door and ignore him until it's feed time just so I'm not labled the "snake molester".
    I've never ripped him off his perch. I place my hands around him and he comes off on his own accord.
    I'd say it has every choice when it comes to being "ripped" off his perch! If he shows me signs that he wants to be left alone, he is left alone.

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    A stuffed toy you reckon?
    And people wonder why forums are getting quieter with responses such as yours.
    I find it exceptionally disappointing to read such a post from a site sponsor.
    You are in no position to judge me. You don't know me or my pets.
    I'd refrain from such posts in the future, unless of course you are the resident forum bully.
     
  14. wokka

    wokka Guest

    I apologize to referring to you, and have edited my post so as to attach the behavior of playing with snakes, rather than the person doing it.
     
  15. GBWhite

    GBWhite Well-Known Member

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    I think you've missed the point being made my friend. Unfortunately some of us are a little less diplomatic in their replies and admit that I've been guilty of the same offence some times. From what I read of Jamie and Wokkas' posts it appears to me that they are only concerned with the welfare of the animal. They are very knowledgeable on the subject of keeping reptiles and if one is truly concerned about the welfare of their animal, their advise should not be overlooked.

    FYI: Reptiles are simple creatures that do not have the ability to acknowledge or display emotional traits such as affection. They do not have the ability or interest to attach themselves to their keeper. I relate to them the same as fish, that being, they are a look at animal and not a (for want of better words) play with me animal. They are completely different to other domestic pets and has been stated only tolerate being handled.

    I can completely understand that you want to make a connection with your animal as it is human nature for one to want to attach themselves to their charges but, unfortunately as far as snakes go they do not have the same concerns and overhandling them can (and often does) have a detrimental effect on their long term well being. I might add that just because the previous owner handled the critter on a daily basis doesn't make it right. What a lot of inexperience keepers mistakenly view as "a connection and friendship" is a result of a misunderstanding of how a snake views their world.

    You ask, "Does a snake "reset" and go back to a traditional "snake attitude" with a change of ownership?" Well to answer that I can only say that they never loose their snake attitude. They possess an attitude that is only concerned with survival and this does not involve a relationship with their keeper.

    Given the analogy you have chosen I don't know think it has a choice in displaying any sign that it wants to be left alone. I think that you'll find that it doesn't matter whether it is plucked from it's perch or has hands wrapped around it the snake views both acts as a threat and/or intimidation and acts on instinct to remove its self from what it perceives as a threat. Just because it crawls on your hands does not mean that it likes you, it means that the snake views this as its only means of escape. Maybe it would be a better test if you left the door of the cage open and then see if it chooses to come out and crawl on your person or go in a different direction.

    I'll add, that I'm not trying to have a go or judge you, I'm simply trying to explain why a snake reacts in certain situations and how it views the world.

    Cheers,

    George
     
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