Haindling vens

Discussion in 'Australian Snakes' started by wizz, Apr 24, 2009.

?
  1. 7-9

    9 vote(s)
    10.0%
  2. 10-13

    4 vote(s)
    4.4%
  3. 13-15

    12 vote(s)
    13.3%
  4. 15-17

    65 vote(s)
    72.2%
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  1. hodges

    hodges Very Well-Known Member

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    Maybe so but im sure that kid would go out an try and catch a few wild elapids don't you think the risk is alot higher then if that kid was with a person that keeps elapids..in a controlled environment ?
     
  2. ivonavich

    ivonavich Suspended Banned

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    Come on some people out there started catching vens in they're early teens... In a controlled environment I can't see the there being a real problem (and I'm not talking bout free handling. hook and tail) with a early start... Free handling is the choice of the individual and should only be allowed once they turn 18 and can be considered legally liable for their own decisions....
     
  3. Kersten

    Kersten Suspended Banned

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    I'm not going to volunteer an opinion in regards to specific age. I will just say that children don't even begin to develop cognitively until they're 9 or 10. In other words, they don't reason in the same way an adult does. Try asking your average 7 year old if they understand what death is and if they can appreciate the fact that their actions could lead to their death. I'd at least want my child to be old enough to grasp the full concept of his mortality, how his decisions could kill him and just what that means before I threw him a brown and said knock yourself out kiddo.
     
  4. ADZz_93

    ADZz_93 Well-Known Member

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    well, i am 15, and i don't think many people my age would be up to it, i dont no if i would be capable, and i have been around snakes for a while now........so i think probs 17+
     
  5. benmcalpine

    benmcalpine Active Member

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    I think they are old enough when they understand the risks, understand the creature and mature enough to make their own decision. Some may be able to do this at ten, some may never.
     
  6. Hoon84

    Hoon84 Well-Known Member

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    Who voted 7 - 9?? :rolleyes:
     
  7. Kersten

    Kersten Suspended Banned

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    That may be true but I don't let them drive.[/QUOTE]

    Well see Greebo, if you were Allan Moffat then your prowess behind the wheel and your general awesomness would be transferred to your kids by osmosis and then they would be able to drive safely (and at speed!) at the age of 7.
     
  8. inthegrass

    inthegrass Very Well-Known Member

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    7-9 is good,;)
     
  9. FAY

    FAY Guest

    18+ and then depending on the maturity (and quickness) of the person, if anything happened to them you would never forgive yourself...............
     
  10. moosenoose

    moosenoose Legendary

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    I think if the person knows the consequences involved I'm going to say 13-15. It's not something I would encourage as someone in my late 30's, but I clearly wanted my own responsibility at that age and knew exactly what I was doing. You can't buy experience with venomous snakes, it's got to be hands-on!
     
  11. cris

    cris Almost Legendary

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    I dont really think it has that much to do with age, well in saying that i think under 11 seems a bit young.
     
  12. snake_boy

    snake_boy Well-Known Member

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    i agree mate, but the jury will not agree
     
  13. DanTheMan

    DanTheMan Suspended Banned

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    It doesn't depend on the age, but the maturity of an individual, but I think these ages may be a bit young in a lot of cases.
    Yes in ways its no different to putting a kid in a car, or even worse, speeding. The other day a car flew past me on the highway, the driver smoking her guts out, in the back seat was a little kid, no older than 4, and they had a "BABY ON BOARD" sign in the back window....
     
  14. m.punja

    m.punja Very Well-Known Member

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    Too many circumstances and different scenarios to answere this one.
     
  15. redbellybite

    redbellybite Almost Legendary

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    I think you are all just focusing on the what if he/she got bitten part and the effects it could have on a small body ...which is well known that a ven bite on the small or elderly are a higher risk ..as far as maturity goes ,I feel a 7-9 year old child under this situation would be more willing to do as you are telling them and lack the "I'm so good just ask me attitude " that alot of teens and just older do have ..so as far as a teaching method, the younger ones are probably a better student then the 13 +
    ..As far as people saying its irresponsible,there are more kids left alone with potential danger that cause severe injuries if not fatal injuries when left alone in the yard with the family dog ,parents arent even thinking of that .
    Any parent that is a venomous snake owner would never leave a child unattended holding an elapid .
    I think its a personal choice and its what your family life is use to ,children that live outside the "norm" do what the general public might think is dangerous and a big risk ..
    but to them its a daily routine and as with everything it has its risks but its a normality as well .
    I have no problems with the pictures you put up Wizz and am sure that child was in capable hands .
     
  16. daniel1234

    daniel1234 Very Well-Known Member

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    I think that sums it up perfectly. When I first posted I was thinking of myself and for some reason relating it to my then driving/riding mentality. However I had a high respect for blue tongue lizards so maybe under the right supervision would be not only ok with vens but a better, more developed human being if I was introduced to them. Also I am speaking as some one who doesn't even know where you begin with handling them let alone free handling, although I am working on the education.
     
  17. jamgo

    jamgo Well-Known Member

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    I started catching elapids around 7 - 8 and i still remember my first red bellied ..... i got bitten 3times trying to put it in a empty beer bottle so i could take it home.
     
  18. FAY

    FAY Guest

    One thing I would like to add....if the child got bitten and survived, I am sure people never think of some of the long term effects some of these bites have,...........at times it doesn't just end with the person surviving.
    I personally would hate to see my child going through that................you can also have serious allergic reactions to the antivenene.
     
  19. seumas12345

    seumas12345 Subscriber Subscriber

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    I'm going to change my opinion from 18+

    I think we can all safely say that if under the correct supervision (which is what we are talking about in this instance) that people of all ages can do lots of things... I've seen 12 year olds race motorbikes at 200+ km/h at the speedway...

    I think instead the question we are all asking is, WHY? Why the hell risk it!? As kirsten has pointed out kids do not think as adults do, and do not fully consider the consequences of their actions. So whilst it would certainly be possible for a child to safely handle elapids (under supervision), it is more a case of "Why even take the chance?"
     
  20. seumas12345

    seumas12345 Subscriber Subscriber

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    I'm eager to hear a little more from you RBB. Do you mind if I just ask you a few questions mixed with a response?
    I hear what you are saying about if you're used to it in your family life then it's a personal choice. My question is, do you believe that it is possible though for snake owners to forget the potential dangers of snakes because they own and handle them? I have owned snakes for less than a year, all non-venemous, and I will hold them, kiss them, let them cruise all over me, and I so quickly forget how scared some people are of them, and the damage that a snake could actually do to me. I'm wondering if it's the same for you guys that own elapids. Do you feel safe around them because you've owned them for ages and had lots of experience? If so, wouldn't it be possible to accidentally give a misconception to children about the risk involved if you were to let them hold one? What I mean is, an experienced keeper knows the risks and how to hold a snake and control it. Perhaps they might forget just how dangerous, unpredictable, and hard to control snakes are to the unexperienced.

    And just one more question, I was wondering if you have kids yourself? (If not then this is a hypothetical question). You have watched your children grow up, you gave birth to them and poured all of your time and energy into their lives to grow them as individuals so they can tackle life head on. Safe to say they are your pride and joy. Do you let them hold venomous snakes? And if so I was wondering, if they were bitten and nearly died, would you let them continue to hold venomous snakes, and just shake it off as "ahh it can happen to anyone" as though it was just a grazed knee from riding a bike.?

    Cheers,
    Seumas
     
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