Head Butting Python

Discussion in 'Australian Snakes' started by Lurch, Mar 1, 2016.

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  1. Lurch

    Lurch New Member

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    My 2 and a half year old Woma python has developed a habit of head butting the glass doors of of his vivarium, he doesn't seem to hurt himself or anything but once he starts doing it he won't stop till he gets tired. He's done this since I've had him, I bought him from a reputable woman breeder when he was a yearling. I've always thought that he did this to tell me that he wanted to get out of his vivarium so I always handle him when he starts to butt his head. But once i handle him even if he's been out for a long time he will persist to continue to head butt the doors when I put him back in his vivarium. I know Womas are known to be burrowers so I thought maybe he was trying to burrow through his doors. Has anyone owned or knows a woma python that does this?

    I'm worried that the head butting is bad for him. When i say head butting he doesn't actually bang his head against the glass. He pushes his head continually. The video is of him doing the behaviour.

    [video=youtube;qYW8KvvT8io]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qYW8KvvT8io[/video]
     
  2. Herpo

    Herpo Well-Known Member

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    I'm not too sure why snakes do this, all I know is you should be vigilant as I've heard of snakes rubbing the skin off their nose this way.
     
  3. cagey

    cagey Subscriber Subscriber

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    Mine does the same periodically - it may be a woma thing; not bright enough to realise there is glass there.
     
  4. pythoninfinite

    pythoninfinite Subscriber Subscriber

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    Common behaviour for males at breeding time, but you may want to check the husbandry parameters - temps, hides etc, it may be that something doesn't suit the snake in that environment. Womas do well in enclosures with newspaper on the floor - they can hide under the paper. The animal is clearly trying to escape - do you know what sex it is?

    Jamie
     
  5. Iguana

    Iguana Well-Known Member

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    A BHP where I worked would do this almost all day, especially when people walked past his enclosure. He was kept in a tank rather small and he had no hides, so it's most likely he was trying to escape due to feeling uncomfortable in his cage.

    I'd put it down to him trying to escape, all snakes will try this to some degree but i've seen Womas' and BHPs' do this the most.
    Try rearranging the cage/adding hides/making sure the cage isn't too hot, it'll make sure he's comfortable and less likely to want to escape. My diamond did this behavior for quite awhile but after adding a couple more hides, he will only does it in the afternoons when he wants out, after I handle him he stops.

    As Herpo said, the skin on their nose can be rubbed off, so it is best to watch out for that. Another solution is to cover the glass front with a sheet of paper, it pretty much stops many snakes from headbutting.
    Hope this helps, good luck!
     
  6. Lurch

    Lurch New Member

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    Thanks for helping Jamie
    When I purchased Lurch (that’s his name) the breeder believed he was a male but said he would check if I was going to breeding him, but I don't intend to do so therefore he didn’t make sure. I would like to check for sure but I haven't learnt how to sex them correctly, I understand the technique I've just never done it before so I don’t feel comfortable doing it to him.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Thank so much for all your help Iguana :)

    He has two hides but I will add some more for him to see if that stops him from doing it so much. I was also thinking of giving him a kind of sand box for something to borrow in.
    If those ideas fail i will cover the glass and see if that works. Thanks again for all your suggestions they were really helpful i will post if successful.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Thanks everyone for your help :)
     
  7. cement

    cement Subscriber Subscriber APS Veteran

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    ""He has two hides but I will add some more for him to see if that stops him from doing it so much. I was also thinking of giving him a kind of sand box for something to borrow in.
    If those ideas fail i will cover the glass and see if that works. Thanks again for all your suggestions they were really helpful i will post if successful.""

    ^ None of this will stop it ^

    womas and black heads are aspiditis.
    They differ from morelia in many ways, one is that they activily seek out and hunt down their food, where morelia will do the same to a degree but prefer to set up an ambush where they think prey will arrive and sit there with their "s"position and wait. If you feed your carpet python in its cage you will probably notice when it is hungry it will set up the strike position in wait for the door to open.
    Aspiditis do not feed this way. They will follow a scent all the way to the animal, attack it and eat it. They are constant prowlers when hungry and they are well known for always being hungry. Your snake is hunting, it is a normal part of their active behaviour and good for its body condition. They will lose the shine of their nose but as long as its a glass and timber enclosure and not wire they won't injure their faces. Make sure your giving them decent feeds too.
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2016
  8. Pauls_Pythons

    Pauls_Pythons Power Seller Power Seller

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    Agree with cement.
    This is a behaviour I see with my BHP's when they are hungry.
    This time of year they are trying to take on as much food as they can to get their storage set up for winter.
    When mine are all quiet & I start thawing food, within 15 minutes they are all going crazy.
     
  9. Grogshla

    Grogshla Very Well-Known Member

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    my childrens python does the same on the metal vents on the side of his tank.
     
  10. SKYWLKR

    SKYWLKR Active Member

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    I have experienced this with my Womas and the best way to describe their behaviour is ADHD.

    Womas are the bulldozers of the snake world and they will push and pull and dig and excavate their environment until it suits them. As long as they arent rubbing against anything harsh like metal etc they will be ok. Dont forget that in the wild they push their heads and noses against rocks, dirt and all kinds of terrain so dont be too worried unless you see scarring or blood. They are hunters, not ambush predators. And they will still love you in the morning!
     
  11. Lurch

    Lurch New Member

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    Thanks Cement for your comments they were really helpful. You mention at the end to make sure I'm giving him a decent feed..
    He is 2 and a half, weighs 554grms and is just shy of 5ft. I feed him a small rat once a fortnight. Do you think this is enough?
    Im concerned its not enough. Would really appreciate your opinion.
     
  12. PythonLegs

    PythonLegs Very Well-Known Member

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    Noticeable lump after feeding? 2x same size food item.
    No lump? Go bigger.
    Definitely sounds like he's askng for food.
     
  13. Wokka

    Wokka Well-Known Member APS Veteran

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    That feeding regime is certainly on the light side of the range although your animal looks to be in good nick. You could increase the food size and frequency to see if that effects behaviour.
     
  14. mikey_mike

    mikey_mike Active Member

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    Perhaps make sure that there's no way Lurch can open those sliding glass doors. Could be time for a lock.
     
  15. sharpy

    sharpy Subscriber Subscriber

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    Just there way to look for a way out. My waters sit at the back door fly screen all day. But when the large female carpet is there she WILL wear away her nose rubbing against the fly screen. There picking up the fresh air scent. If i open the front door when waters are roaming they will head for the open front door. There good at what they do, just remember that.
     
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