Heating newly built tank

Discussion in 'DIY Zone' started by GeorgeAnton, Feb 22, 2016.

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  1. GeorgeAnton

    GeorgeAnton New Member

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    hey guys, so i recently built a tank with melamine that's 1000x600x800mm (LxWxH) and was looking for some help in regards to heating.

    I intend to use a single ceramic heat emitter (with a cage around it of course) but was unsure of how strong to get it so as to maintain decent temp gradient.

    currently, my jungle python is in a tank that's 600x400x400mm (LxWxH) which contains a single 50w CHE and that maintains an "okay" heat gradient when hooked up to a thermostat.

    also, any advice on how i should position my vents?


    New tank being built:
    [​IMG]

    Current tank:
    [​IMG]

    Thanks :)
     

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  2. pinefamily

    pinefamily Subscriber Subscriber

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    I'd start with a 100w; if not hot enough on the basking spot, get the next one up.
    At the hot end, the vent should be low; at the cool end it should be higher.
     
  3. Burgo89

    Burgo89 Active Member

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    [MENTION=38465]pinefamily[/MENTION] got that backwards I think, hot high cool low?
     
  4. pinefamily

    pinefamily Subscriber Subscriber

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    @Burgo89 Not unless every tank we own is wrong. :D
    Have to admit, you made me doubt it myself; had to check all vents in the house.
     
  5. Burgo89

    Burgo89 Active Member

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    I don't know what to believe any more :?

    [​IMG]
     

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  6. GeorgeAnton

    GeorgeAnton New Member

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    [MENTION=38465]pinefamily[/MENTION] i personally believed it to be that way as well. i figured having the vents high on the hot side would remove most of the hot air and thus ruin the temp gradient. however after reading [MENTION=40472]Burgo89[/MENTION]'s screenshot i realise i've been going about this completely wrong. i never considered there to be 3 sections, but rather 2 (hot/cold).

    thanks for your help everyone :)
     
  7. BrownHash

    BrownHash Well-Known Member

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    Its a gradient, so I guess that means there is an infinite number of "sections".

    As for high and low on vents, I don't think it really matters that much. As long as there is one high and one low then it should create air flow. If you have it high in the hot section and low in the cool section then you will most likely get more air flow, but more energy would be required to heat the hot end as the hotter air from the heat source would be lost quicker. If you go vice versa, then the air flow would be lower and the energy required to heat the enclosure would probably be lower. If you have them both on the same end, there will still be air flow, but it won't circulate as well. And, if you put the vent on equal levels at opposite ends you will create a a vacuum from the air drawing away in both directions, which will then cause a tear in time and space :D

    The only way I can see that you wont have air flow is if there are <2 vents, or they are placed in spots at the exact same temperature, although the latter will still probably be air flow caused by air movement outside of the enclosure.

    If you really want to get an idea of how the heat works in your enclosure I would advise you to use a FLIR camera and multiple vents. Then open and close different vents to see how it affects the heat.
     
  8. pinefamily

    pinefamily Subscriber Subscriber

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    @BrownHash you have nailed it. Just as it says on the screenshot, having a vent high at the hot end (and vice versa at the cool end) will promote air flow. While that's not a bad thing as such, it will increase heating costs as you say. The first tank we ever bought was a commercially made flat pack, and I simply followed the instructions.

    And GeorgeAnton, just a note on your build. Looking at the photo in your first post, it looks like the sides are not sitting on the bottom piece. it would be more structurally sound if they were.
     
  9. Wokka

    Wokka Well-Known Member APS Veteran

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    Most of our cages have pegboard back walls in the cool end to get the temperature as close as possible to ambient, and no ventilation in the hot end to save on heating costs. I don't know that there is a need to create airflow. If you think that in the wild caves and hollow logs often have minimal air flow.
     
  10. Snapped

    Snapped Subscriber Subscriber

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    Depending on the ambient temperature (and where you live, if you live in Melb it will get colder etc) will give you a better idea of what wattage to use, but I'd try it out with 2 different CHE's, start with a 100W and test the basking spot over a few days, then you will know whether to go higher, or lower.



    Seems to be confusing, with a few different theories on vent placement. :p



    [​IMG]
     

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  11. Burgo89

    Burgo89 Active Member

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    Along as it ain't air tight I think you be right
     
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