Help - Super Aggressive Python

Discussion in 'Herp Help' started by Chessa, Oct 28, 2018.

  1. Chessa

    Chessa Subscriber Subscriber

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    Looking for some advice. I have a female woma python that I don't know how to make less aggressive. I've had her since 2014, and she's just becoming more and more aggressive, both in and out of the cage. She strikes at the glass, and you can't even fill up her water bowl without her attempting to grab you. She's never just struck either, she bites and doesn't let go. I don't know what to do short of giving her away to someone that is more experienced. She's on her own in a room without much disruption, she's feed every 2-3 weeks and health wise is perfect.
     
  2. Bl69aze

    Bl69aze Very Well-Known Member

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    What are you feeding her? How big is she?

    Is she going into shed?

    What are your temps?
    Has anything happened recently?

    Pictures are always nice
     
  3. Chessa

    Chessa Subscriber Subscriber

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    Hey. So temps range from room temp about 22 to heated box at 32. This happens mostly out of shed, generally don't see her while she is shedding. Feeding her rats about medium to large depending on what the shops have.
    Nothing had changed recently, same behavior I've seen for quite some time. I'll try and find a recent photo, can't handle her to measure her up. [​IMG]

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  4. Bl69aze

    Bl69aze Very Well-Known Member

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    Is she only being defensive in cage? Her biting and letting go is a defensive bite, as you already probably know, however I have seen womas be super angry when trying to be taken out of their enclosure, but then puppy dog tame
    Once out. Do you have a snake hook to assist?
     
  5. Blighty

    Blighty Not so new Member

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    I notice in your OP you said it bites and doesn't let go. Is it wrapping you as well?
     
  6. Chessa

    Chessa Subscriber Subscriber

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    The biting is both in and out of the cage. Have tried the hook you assist too. Depends on the day, she's mostly ok with the hook but sometimes bites it too. As soon as you touch her she tries to bite and wrap. That photo was one of the rare occasions she was placid

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  7. Synveil

    Synveil Not so new Member

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    I'm still relatively new to the hobby, but biting and wrapping would be a sign of hunger you would think? Perhaps her feeding isnt quite often enough? The spacing if 2 to 3 weeks between meals may be a little more than she wants.

    Also, her temps of 32 on the hot end seems low for a grown woma, I've got my hatchling on 32-33 degree heat 24/7 at the moment, but a sub adult-adult should be on 35-38 degree heat if I'm not mistaken.
     
  8. cris

    cris Almost Legendary

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    Feeding more might help, but it could just be that the snake is 'wired' to try and eat pretty much anything.
    --- Automatic Post Merged, Oct 28, 2018, Original Post Date: Oct 28, 2018 ---
    I don't keep womas, but I have not heard of snakes needing 35-38C temperatures. Typically access to 32C and cooler area is good for most species. Having temperatures around 35-38C is dangerous unless it is an isolated basking spot in a well ventilated (or otherwise providing a much cooler area) enclosure.
     
  9. Synveil

    Synveil Not so new Member

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    As I said I'm relatively new to the hobby, and I've been going from a number of care sheets that suggest the 30-33 degree for hatchling womas and 35-36 (some say to 38) degree heat for a grown snake.
     
  10. Bl69aze

    Bl69aze Very Well-Known Member

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    Oops thought u said she bites and does let go

    That’s def a feeding response bite if she’s wrapping around

    Maybe up the food size or frequency? What’s the weight of your food? Your medium sized food could be someone else’s weaner size (hehe)

    Who’s to say a bitey snake is a bad thing? Gives you experience and u can learn to deal with them better in future
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2018
  11. Chessa

    Chessa Subscriber Subscriber

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    I think being a Woma she's just hungry all the time maybe? The last lot I bought were on the small side, probably 200g rats. I'll try feeding more often, hopefully she calms down a little. Took some more pics this morning.[​IMG][​IMG]

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  12. Bl69aze

    Bl69aze Very Well-Known Member

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    I have heard of some womas being overly food motivated and strike everything, was she ever non bitey?
     
  13. dragonlover1

    dragonlover1 Subscriber Subscriber

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    Some Womas (like all species can be) are just bitey, my son used to have 1 that bit him on the hand and then wrapped around his neck.I suppose it was lucky I was there to unwrap it as he was having trouble breathing. He ended up swapping it for a Darwin but now he wishes he still had it as he has more experience now and thinks he could control it better.
     
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  14. Sdaji

    Sdaji Almost Legendary

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    This is a very simple situation with a very simple explanation. Unfortunately, there isn't a quick, easy solution.

    Your Woma loves to eat and sees you as food. This is not anger or fear or anything of the sort, she just thinks you are something she can eat. There are two potential ways to fix this, one of which may not be easy, the other is not good and may not work anyway. The more difficult way is to train her to know that humans are not food. Frequent handling of the right type (which is not really easy for a newbie to understand) might work, but won't be quick or easy to accomplish, if it's at all possible. If your snake currently recognises humans as food, it may be as difficult to convince her otherwise as it is to convince a woma that any other animals such as rats and lizards are not food. The other method is to simply feed her so much that she isn't hungry. She doesn't look overweight and if she's striking at the glass at any movement, she's extremely hungry (perhaps just because she's a pig, which is common in womas), so I would definitely feed her at least a little more. If that doesn't change anything, I'd just accept that's how she is and either love her as she is or give her to someone who likes her and get yourself a snake which handles comfortably.

    If it's simply that she recognises humans as food, you probably just can't 'fix' it because it's not a 'problem' as such.
     

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