How long does it normally take

Discussion in 'Australian Snakes' started by Kirk1701, Mar 9, 2018.

  1. Kirk1701

    Kirk1701 Active Member

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    Hi,

    Just wondering from people’s experience how long it takes for a hatchie to start mellowing. Obviously I’m not expecting it to be overnight but would like to hear from others how long it seemed to take before their snakes got less snappy.


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  2. kittycat17

    kittycat17 Well-Known Member

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    I find they generally calm down once they get into decent sized prey, as they get bigger they seem to feel less threatened :)


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  3. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    My spotted was a fire cracker when I first got it, being bought from a pet store, it was subject to daily handling by staff taking it out to show potential customers, could have been 10 times a day. I'd visited the store several times "thinking" about getting it and every time I visited, the python would be out getting handled and striking at everyone who walked past. I eventually decided to get it and traded a 4 year old male Macleay River turtle for it.

    Once I got it home and set up in its enclosure, I left it completely alone for 2-3 weeks, just to allow it to settle down and I've had it now since August last year and it's never bitten me or tried to. I don't have an overwhelming urge to handle my snakes, I'm of the opinion that reptile pets are for our observational enjoyment and that they themselves do NOT enjoy being "man handled." I get it out of its enclosure when I need to clean etc put I simply take the python out by removing the hide it's in and placing it in another container. There's no direct contact between us. I have handled it probably half a dozen times in the last 6 months, purely for photographing and to get a rough idea of how much it has grown. Well it's gone from about 10 inches long to the length of my arm now and I attribute it's calm nature now to NOT being handled all the time.

    Back when it first came home with me. This was typical, defensive cranky pose, tail tightly wrapped - seeking security. But it was understandable given how it was living.
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    Now - 6 months on.
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    Last edited: Mar 9, 2018
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  4. Bl69aze

    Bl69aze Very Well-Known Member

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    Mine were never “snappy” except the dumb decisions I made, apart from that they’ve been fine since I’ve got them
     
  5. cris

    cris Almost Legendary

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    Just like with all animals it is mostly genetic and a bit is related to environment. Many snakes are much snappier when young but grow out of it. Some are never snappy, some will always be snappy. If you compare races of carpet python, MD carpets are normally extremely placid from the start and Jungle pythons are typically more snappy etc. There are plenty of exceptions.

    Geting bitten by a small python is nothing to worry about 99.99% of the time.
     
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  6. dragonlover1

    dragonlover1 Subscriber Subscriber

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    I have 4 Ants,my pygmy banded female only once bit me ,thinking I was food- she let go quickly when she realized I wasn't! My Childreni bit me once when I stupidly tried to clean his house after dark. The other 2 ( blonde mac and a male pygmy banded ) have only ever snapped at air.
    My son has 7 pythons who have never bitten.But he used to have a Woma he wasn't happy with.
     
  7. Nerdhero

    Nerdhero Not so new Member

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    Other thing to consider is if its just being snappy inside its enclosure? Generally once you get them out they will settle down as they realise there is no food and there is no threat to their safety. Of course this is only a generalisation, as you've noted hatchlings will remains defensive for longer....its a big scary world out there for the little guys.

    If its when its inside the enclosure that your having trouble try looking up handling techniques and/or investing in a snake hook. They are a handy tool to help manipulate your snake. I advise to watch videos on the use of them though as contrary to popular belief you don't really pick the snakes up with just the hook. Also since you've only just gotten the little guy some alone time will surely help as well. They are in a new an daunting place, over time they will become more comfortable with their surroundings and then handling can occur.

    *Based on my very limited experience* My snakes are doing much better now that I handle them less. No more then once a week, for maybe 20-30 mins with majority of that time being supervised outdoor exploration. Since getting a hook and becoming confident in my handling ability I have not received a strike let alone a bite. This of course could be attributed to a lot of other factors as well and as I said its a limited sample size I have (3 snakes).
     
  8. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    This is exactly what I have found, they handle a lot better when they're handled less. Once/week-fortnight for me and only if it's absolutely necessary.
     
  9. Aquaman

    Aquaman Crowy

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    Handle all mine 3-4 times a week .
    Never cage defensive and very curious when out.
    Or just curl up and sleep.

    Only time snappy is at feeding time,
    And sometimes around shed.
    Been bitten a couple of times, but only due to my own stupidity.
    I have a favourite, who comes and meets me at the glass. Spend a lot of time with him just Chillin on the beanbag watching Netflix
     
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  10. Pauls_Pythons

    Pauls_Pythons Power Seller Power Seller

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    Some never 'mellow' as you put it.
    Like humans they all have different behaviours and attitudes.
    Some strike because they think food is on offer which is just a reaction to the situation. Others strike out of fear (defensive reaction).

    I have 6 week old BHP hatchies that no longer feel threatened so they no longer strike.
    Handling too much, (3-4 times a week is too much IMO) is as bad as not handling at all.
    I only handle when I need too, (More often with hatchies that are cleaned out as needed because they love to make a mess). Snakes have no wish to be handled, cuddled, patted or stroked at all. They gain nothing from the interaction. Their response to you is not born of affection but only of fear. If they are not afraid the hand coming into their territory and they know its not food they will not strike at it.
     
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  11. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    Yep. 100% correct.
     
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  12. Foozil

    Foozil Well-Known Member

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    I don't handle my hatchlings/yearlings unless I'm cleaning their enclosures or showing them to my friends. I only regularly handle my established feeders, handling hatchies just causes unnecessary stress to the animal and may put them off feeding (based off personal experience)
     

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