How long does it take for a 6-month-old RSP to settle in?

Discussion in 'Australian Snakes' started by benjamind2010, Jun 15, 2013.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. benjamind2010

    benjamind2010 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2010
    Messages:
    564
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Wherever you aren't
    Surely it doesn't take any longer than 1 week for morelia carinata? Most morelias I've had in the past took their first feed within 2 days (unless they were going into shed when I got them). It's the first time I've had Rough scaled pythons, I recently got a pair of 6-month-olds from a reputable breeder, and even have their feed sheets which detail their history, so everything is fine on the breeder's side.

    The male took his fuzzy mouse without any problems, so I know I'm not going to have any trouble with him. The female, however, seems like another story and I feel I'm going to have a little bit of trouble getting her to eat, she seems interested but ends up not eating it. I've tried using small tweezers holding the fuzzy by the tail and just dangling it about an inch away, and she inspects the prey item but does not take it. Next attempt (next Wednesday) I'll defrost a fuzzy in warm water and see if it makes any difference. I'm not sure if that will work but I will give it a go and see.

    I think it's a case of nerves, because I observed both of them, and she was exploring her click-clack quite a bit more than the male who was just chilling out and resting on both occasions I checked on them during the last few days. My instincts tell me that whenever I see that kind of thing, I know that I'm in for a bit of trouble, and that set off alarm bells and I thought "Yep, she's going to be a bit of a problem". In this case I was spot on because she refused to eat. So that confirmed what I had been thinking when I was observing them on both occasions.

    Anyway I'm just going to give the male her fuzzy and let him finish it off and worry about her later. But this has me worried where one snake eats fine and the other one just refuses, my hunch is she's more timid than the male and she stresses more easily. I know for a fact that she's eaten several meals before I got her, so she's obviously been feeding fine. I know that moving them to a new habitat can stress them out and I'm OK with that, they've been here for a week so they should be settled in by now. The temps are fine, they have somewhere to hide, they're in small click-clack containers with just newspaper and the tiny hide box to help them feel more secure and of course a tiny water bowl. I've tested the ambient temps which are about 24 to 26 degrees, with the hot spot being around 31-34 degrees.

    I know snakes can go a long time without feeding, but these are juveniles and it would be great if both of them would feed so I could get them to grow to roughly the same size together.
     
  2. Helikaon

    Helikaon Very Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2007
    Messages:
    2,949
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    SEQLD
    Id be giving her something to climb on rsps barely touch the ground when theres something to roost on and are much more comfortable. If she doesnt eat strait away leave it in for a few hours and see if she takes it
     
  3. daz26

    daz26 Not so new Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2010
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    0
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    brisbane
    my RSP's are on the ground all the time and they have roost everywhere so not sure where you get that from the male is a great feeder but for 3yr old female will go off her food over any change made to her set up
     
  4. Helikaon

    Helikaon Very Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2007
    Messages:
    2,949
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    SEQLD
    mine have branches and 'up high' hides with heat panels, and are rarely curled up anyhwere near ground level. plus multiple breeders rec that bubs are given perching spots (bunnings garden mesh stuff works great for tubs) to encourage eating. and considering they're mostly arboreal and close genetic relatives to GTP's it all makes sense
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2013
  5. benjamind2010

    benjamind2010 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2010
    Messages:
    564
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Wherever you aren't
    Yep. She refused to eat it. Left it in there for 4 hours...still no dice. Even though it probably hadn't gone off yet I still threw the fuzzy out as it was starting to change color.
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2013
  6. Dendrobates

    Dendrobates Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2013
    Messages:
    178
    Likes Received:
    0
    Roughies can be really painful feeders sometimes, but they do eat if they really want it. I've had a pair for 7yrs now.. the male is a pig and always has been, he eats all year round. My female is the fussiest snake I've ever had, when she was younger she would eat once every few months, nowadays she will only eat a rat 1 or 2 times a year and it has to be left in with her overnight, in her hide with her, and heavily scented with bird feathers (yet she won't eat a bird).
     
  7. krefft

    krefft <span style="font-weight:bold;color:#B200FF;">Snak

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2007
    Messages:
    450
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Sydney
    Plenty of snakes go off their food this time of year regardless of the temp in the enclosure. It's nothing to worry about.
     
  8. Ramsayi

    Ramsayi Very Well-Known Member APS Veteran

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2003
    Messages:
    4,785
    Likes Received:
    67
    Location:
    Sydney
    They are all individual,just because one does something doesn't automatically follow that the other one should too,they aren't machines.
    Keep them warm in a quiet area with minimal disturbance and try feeding weekly of an evening.

    Seems like you haven't had them long and you are already contemplating giving it back to the breeder even though the breeders records show it has been feeding well?

    Are you sure it hasn't gone into a shed cycle or that your setup is spot on?

    Last trouble you had was with some Womas wasn't it? Maybe it's not the animal that is the issue.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2013
  9. Becca-Marie

    Becca-Marie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2011
    Messages:
    363
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Victoria
    4 hours? Leave it in over night. My spotted likes her privacy when feeding which means lights off and leave it with her. Might just be a shy feeder. If it was feeding well before you got it, stress and you may need to change a few things with yoyr set up? My advice, ring the breeder and they should be able to help you.

    Also the curious ones arent necessarily trouble. My woma is the most curious little thing and iv never had him refuse a feed.
    Sent from my LG-P690f using Tapatalk 2
     
  10. benjamind2010

    benjamind2010 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2010
    Messages:
    564
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Wherever you aren't
    Yes, I'd agree the problem is with me and not the snake. It turns out that the heat mat was not properly underneath her container. The male had 1/3 of his tub on the heat whereas she only had 1/6 which was incorrect.

    The problem has been rectified. The snake should feed. I will still wait a week or so for her to continue settling down then try again.

    I must admit I'm a bit of a drama maniac and tend to jump the gun a lot but that's what I'm like. I wish I wasn't so impetuous! I should work on my patience ;)
     
  11. Becca-Marie

    Becca-Marie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2011
    Messages:
    363
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Victoria
    Its good you worked out what was wrong. Dw i am always stressing over my babies.

    Sent from my LG-P690f using Tapatalk 2
     
  12. Don't be surprised if you continue to get an inconsistent feeding response from either snake. Roughies are inclined to eat when they feel like it, and sometimes just aren't interested. This doesn't mean there is anything wrong with them, or that they will be "difficult" in the long-term.

    I have a pair given to me by John Weigel a few years ago, and each of them is inclined to go off food for a couple of months at a time when they feel like it, but they always get back into it when they feel like it. They have, however, grown quite normally, and are in perfect health. I just don't give it any thought anymore - if they don't eat a couple of times, then I just don't try for a couple of months, and they will always come to the front of the cage when they're ready.

    As with any snake, if you provide the right environment, and if they are established feeders, they will eat when they're ready - they won't starve. This is what snakes do, and getting anxious about it when it is not a problem will damage your enjoyment of them.

    I believe this is especially a characteristic of RSPs.

    Jamie
     
  13. benjamind2010

    benjamind2010 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2010
    Messages:
    564
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Wherever you aren't
    Tried again tonight. No luck, at all. She wasn't the least bit interested. Male, of course, snapped up the fuzzy mouse without much hesitation. Will try again in 1 week.
     
  14. brothrofthhighwy

    brothrofthhighwy Subscriber Subscriber

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2013
    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    goldy
    my roughie was the same, girl, very painful journey getting her to even eat. had a nice set up but I think maybe i handled her abit too much. after 2 or 3 months of this I put her in a small click clack directly on heat, pillow case covering and no handling. Shes now one of my best feeders and is growing fast. I also tried egg yolk on fuzzie this got her feeding.
     
  15. Owzi

    Owzi Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2006
    Messages:
    333
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Vic
    I've had the pleasure of hatching out Roughies the past couple of seasons & they can be trickier to get started. I've also had a few that were thriving go to new homes & take a while to settle in, I wouldn't be stressing too much just yet.
    There has been some good advice here already, yes Roughies like to climb like all Morelia & get in their ambush position. If your RSPs are 'always' on the ground I would think there is another environmental issue in the enclosure, most likely too hot & they are moving away from a heat source.
    You mentioned holding the fuzzy with tweezers by the tail- sometimes something as little as how you offer the prey can throw them off! It's best to hold the mouse just in front of the hind legs & offer it face first horizontally.
    Other factors can play a part, are you offering food at night when the animal is most active? Are you turning lots of light on & moving a lot in front of its tub, they are easily disturbed. When you open the tub does a rush of cool air flow in?
    Be sure your thawed mouse is nice & warm before offering.
    As for offering the food, I've found the majority of young RSPs don't respond well to tease feeding. Lightly tickle the head, nose & neck of the snake, even the tail. If it just takes off, perhaps it's not for that snake. However this past season I did get 2 hatchies going with very strong tease feeding, you'll have to judge it yourself.
    Other tricks I'd try would be to 'brain' the mouse, make a slight incision into the skull of the thawed mouse & squeeze some fluid out, the stronger scent may just do it.
    Depending where you are, most reptile type shops now sell frozen quail, as a last resort I would scent a mouse with quail, it's scent gold for Roughies!! I thaw the quail, cut open its body cavity & roll the mouses head inside. Sounds a bit gruesome but it isn't that bad & works a treat. If all efforts fail, do leave the mouse in the tub overnight, often they will feed in their own time.
    Hope some of this helps, good luck
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page