ID confirmation please

Discussion in 'Reptile and Amphibian Identification' started by sd1981, Dec 7, 2012.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. sd1981

    sd1981 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2011
    Messages:
    463
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Brisbane QLD
    Hi there, I found a 2-3 ft snake on the road, which had been run over and was being attacked by a crow. It had olive brown scales with a bluish hue over its scales and creamy brown belly scales.... I'll attempt to attach a pic... Found in Ipswich SE QLD image.jpg
    and was well and truly dead when I got to it...
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Dec 7, 2012
  2. richoman_3

    richoman_3 Very Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2009
    Messages:
    2,555
    Likes Received:
    7
    Location:
    Melbourne
    eastern brown snake
     
  3. Red-Ink

    Red-Ink Very Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2008
    Messages:
    2,393
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    149.6 million kms to the left of a G2V
    Eastern Brown...

    - - - Updated - - -

    By... mere seconds richo lol
     
  4. sd1981

    sd1981 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2011
    Messages:
    463
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Brisbane QLD
    I thought so, but I'm not a snake guy so I wanted to be sure, thanks guys...
     
  5. Gruni

    Gruni Very Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2012
    Messages:
    1,797
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Nth NSW
    Well done guys, squished up like that I had no idea, I still need to see the snake spread out if I have any hope of an ID.
     
  6. Red-Ink

    Red-Ink Very Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2008
    Messages:
    2,393
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    149.6 million kms to the left of a G2V
    If there ever was a snake species here that you want to be able to identify at a glance in the wild it's these guys lol
     
  7. Bluetongue1

    Bluetongue1 Guest

    EBs are highly variable in colour. They can range from greyish brown through to brown to quite red. They can also be light through to very dark. The diagnostic feature is the ventrals – cream base colour with orange to brown short streaks. Once yon have seen an example, you can readily recognise it on other individuals.

    Blue
     
  8. -Peter

    -Peter Guest

    Last course we had a wild caught mature Sydney Pseudonaja textilis with cream ventrals and no flecks or streaks and another with black flecks. They are indeed extremely variable in colour.
     
  9. eipper

    eipper Very Well-Known Member APS Veteran

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2007
    Messages:
    2,252
    Likes Received:
    51
    Location:
    SEQ
    Plenty of Pseudonaja have cream to yellow bellies with ventral markings.
     
  10. Bluetongue1

    Bluetongue1 Guest

    Scott, My comments were in respect to the specific location given. That is my shortfall in not stating this.

    Peter, All I can say is that these individuals are exceptional animals and not representative of the norm. The lesson to be had here is to treat any unidentified snake as potentially dangerously venomous.

    Blue
     
  11. Jonno from ERD

    Jonno from ERD Very Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2007
    Messages:
    3,453
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Hi Blue,

    Are you referring to Ipswich as the specific location? If so, they aren't immune to the variability encountered in P.textilis throughout their entire range...in fact, I would say they are amongst the most variable of the examples I have seen, apart from the Brigalow Belt.
     
  12. Bluetongue1

    Bluetongue1 Guest

    Jonno,

    Scott was letting me know that the description I provided of the ventrals was not exclusively diagnostic of an EB and that it is common amongst many species of Pseudonaja. I acknowledged my mistake. What I should have stated is that for the locality of Ipswich, it is diagnostic for an EB as that is the only species of Pseudonaja occurring in the region.

    As for the variability of dorsal colours, I would not even try to describe what forms are found where. I will add that in my limited experience with these snakes in the field, they move in a really smooth, rapid manner that I find distinctive. I do not know if others would concur with that perception.

    Blue
     
  13. Mulgaaustralis

    Mulgaaustralis Not so new Member

    Joined:
    May 7, 2012
    Messages:
    95
    Likes Received:
    1
    Someone is really good at reading books.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page