Id please ? :)

Discussion in 'Reptile and Amphibian Identification' started by calebs92, Jul 17, 2013.

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  1. Dendrobates

    Dendrobates Active Member

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    I've never heard of panoptes on Bribie Island (I've personally only seen gouldii there), but I know of a couple found in a small pocket of heath land near Pelican Waters which is pretty close by. Moreton Island also only has gouldii on it (interestingly there are no lacies there) so I guess that would make it the most easternly point for V. gouldii?
     
  2. moosenoose

    moosenoose Legendary

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    I'm pretty sure she guessed it was a lizard ;)
     
  3. eipper

    eipper Very Well-Known Member APS Veteran

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    I have caught panoptes on Bribie
     
  4. Dendrobates

    Dendrobates Active Member

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    Any photos of them Eipper?
     
  5. Bluetongue1

    Bluetongue1 Guest

    I don’t know whether or not the throat markings are a locality thing but I have seen V. gouldii with similar markings. The alternating rows of light and dark spots and the continuation of the bands of dark dots onto the ventral surface are diagnostic for V. panoptes.


    I could give you examples to negate your universal accusation or point out the hypocrisy of keeping captive bred, which come from, and continues to fuel, wild taking. Such criticism is not helpful to anyone.

    I have found that people who feel keeping wild animals captive are most concerned that that behaviourally they have previously been able to wander wherever. They also see being surrounded by nature as enriching and desired by animals. What they fail to appreciate is that being in nature is a struggle to survive for wild animals. Death rates of 80% to 90% or more, in a population, are the norm. Take a pair of pythons. Only 2 of their offspring need to make it to reproductive age to replace the parents and keep the population stable. Let’s say the female breeds every two years and has four clutches of 25 eggs – a very conservative number all up. Of the 100 offspring produced, there is only ecological room for 2 (the replacements of the parents). 98 must die. You can do the same low breeders such as geckos. Three clutches per year of 2 eggs over 5 years produces 30 offspring. 28 must die.

    Captivity provides food that “free to roam behaviour” is usually about finding. It provides fresh water. It provides security and removes all predators that were a constant threat when out looking for food. Snakes, for example, spend the majority of their time concealed in tight, dark, refuges, keeping warm and reducing water loss while staying away from predators.

    Animals are adaptable. They can alter their behaviour to suit their surrounds and circumstances. Good husbandry takes into account the basic behavioural needs of each particular species. In nature, many reptiles and frogs will be eaten alive. Is that cruel? Surely that is a worse fate than having your tucker, water and a warm bed on tap?

    Food for thought....
    Blue
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 22, 2013
  6. eipper

    eipper Very Well-Known Member APS Veteran

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    I will have a look I don't think I did, it was in really poor condition.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 26, 2013
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