Kimberley Area (Dial Up DEATH!)

Discussion in 'Field Herping and Reptile Studies' started by Nephrurus, Sep 5, 2007.

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  1. Nephrurus

    Nephrurus Very Well-Known Member

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    I spent a fair bit of time in the northern area of the Kimberley on my last trip (as well as the west) and as the habitat is a little bit different (less rugged) we caught/ observed a different array of critters.

    Hope you enjoy the pics, I'll do a little spiel on each species.

    The old Dingo is quite common around these parts. Very curious, they'll often follow you at a distance when you're out herping. They are an incredibly important part of the ecosystem, supressing cats (and in areas furthur south like the central deserts, foxes). Faecal analysis has shown that in some areas during the wet season Dingos live on a diet of grasshoppers and cats.
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    Ctenotus robustus (above and below). A common skink that has a very wide distribution and a habit of being caught in Elliott traps (like this one).
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    A tiny blind snake Ramphotyphlops howii that was very tricky to ID. It's tiny, so counting mid body scale rows and focussing on head scales is difficult.
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    Common rock rats are one of the most commonly caught species in sandstone areas.

    Brown Tree Snakes up north get quite big and very spectacular. This one was a beauty. Please excuse the handling shot, but i feel it is worthy of inclusion as it gives a decent indication of the size of this animal.
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    A few turtle species are found up there, this one is reasonably common, Chelodinia rugosa.
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    There are many species of bat through the Kimberley. This is one of the smallest, Vespadelus caurinus
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    Like a sandswimmer, the Glaphryomorphus isolepis "swims" through dirt.

    One of the commonest gecko species under sandstone slabs was Gehyra nana.
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    Ningbing Antechinus are one of the most beautiful small mammals found in the region (I'm just saying that, i have a soft spot for Dasyurids.... it's the quick of the nail bed). This particular animal was carrying 4 pouch young.
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    Lerista kalumbaru is a fairly secretive species that is found under rocks surrounded by thick leaf litter.

    Proablepharus tenuis is one of the smallest lizards around. They are a pain to pick up as my fingers aren't small enough! Pictured is a full grown adult.
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    Rock ringtail possums are usually very shy, but seem to be fairly approachable when they have young with them. We saw a total of 3 young on the trip. This animal is a male and was found with it's mate and one young.

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    Diporiphora bennetti is fairly common (evident) in freshly burnt areas. They have a short flight distance, so often let you approach quite close.

    Long Haired Rats Rattus villosisimus are the main food item for the Water Python at Fogg Dam. It occured to me that although everyone hears alot about them, few people have actually seen one. They get fairly big.
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    Orange leaf nose bat. Threatened species. Very delicate cave dwellers.

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    Heteronotia planiceps (above and below) are uncommon under sandstone slabs. They seem to prefer cooler rocks sheltered by trees and leaf litter.
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    The Orange Naped Snake Furina ornata is a very spectacular elapid that has a very wide distribution. Beautiful patterning over the scales. Skink specialist.
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    Last but not least, the magnificent kimberley rock monitorVaranus glauertii. Amazingly marked. THis one was just a baby found under a piece of sandstone about 20cm x 10cm.
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    Hope you enjoy the photos.

    All photos are property of Henry Cook, and cannot be used without his permission.

    All the best,

    -Henry Cook
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2007
  2. pugsly

    pugsly Suspended Banned

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    Great stuff mate.

    Love to get there one day..

    That orange nape a super shot
     
  3. method

    method Very Well-Known Member

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    awesome pics, luv that brown tree snake.

    Makes me wanna go out and do sum herping for myself
     
  4. S.D.

    S.D. Active Member

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    When I first saw that BTS pic I thought it must have been a BHP – that thing is HUGE! Great pics too btw man. There’s a whole lot of stuff in the Kimberley’s. Very interesting stuff. Thanks for sharing :)
     
  5. reptilegirl_jordan

    reptilegirl_jordan Very Well-Known Member

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    the bts are rippers!,thanks for sharing
     
  6. Bung-Eye

    Bung-Eye Well-Known Member

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    some awesome photo's there mate
     
  7. glebopalma

    glebopalma Not so new Member

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    Awesome V. glauerti, I love the patern. Thanks for sharing!
     
  8. Mr feegle

    Mr feegle Active Member

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    love the twin tail on the NANA
    Great photos looks like a beautiful part of the country
     
  9. mines bigger

    mines bigger Well-Known Member

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    they are awesome pics there mate
     
  10. cmclean

    cmclean Guest

    I want to go with you all next trip..... Looks like you had a great time and are extremely knowledgable on Australian Fauna. Are the trips for work or pleasure?
     
  11. Radar

    Radar Very Well-Known Member

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    Good to see someone who knows the importance of Top predators in suppressing introduced mesopredators. Eradicating the Dingo is possibly the biggest mistake we can make for many small mammal species, from a conservation point of view.

    Great shots, Some of that stuff is amazing to see in the flesh, but these will have to do for now:D
     
  12. hodges

    hodges Very Well-Known Member

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    love the kimberley rock monitor and the bats :). thanks for sharing
    cheers,
    brad
     
  13. Kyro

    Kyro Very Well-Known Member

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    That Antechinus is absolutely gorgeous Henry, i have a bit of a soft spot for those little guys too.Do the males suffer a similar fate to other Antechinus species:lol:?
     
  14. Mrs I

    Mrs I Very Well-Known Member

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    What an awesome adventure. Thanks for sharing.

    Mrs I

    xxx
     
  15. kelly

    kelly Very Well-Known Member

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    Nice pictures Neph, that one of the bat is gorgeous!

    P.S...Didn't see any coastal carpets did you? I know they're your fave ;)
     
  16. dazza74

    dazza74 Very Well-Known Member

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    thanx for sharing they are great pics looks like you had a great time
     
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