Kimberley Rock Monitors

Discussion in 'General Reptile Discussion' started by Stompsy, Jul 18, 2016.

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  1. mrkos

    mrkos Well-Known Member

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    My favourite monitor of all time to keep would be the Pygmy mulga they have the look and attitude of a much larger lizard yet can be kept in a small enclosure and are basic to look after. I have noticed there is not many for sale these days let's hope they don't disappear from the hobby in years to come
     
  2. pinefamily

    pinefamily Subscriber Subscriber

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    [MENTION=41840]Oshkii[/MENTION], you do make some valid points. I have to say that there a lot (if not the majority) of people who don't do their research properly, whether it be space requirements, temperament, or future size. Getting a lacie or panoptes as a first monitor, and getting your hand shredded due to lack of due care, isn't ideal. And even on here, we still see posts from people asking basic questions about reptile care that should have been researched before purchase. I saw a post the other day asking about how to breed pythons. It's for these kind of people, and for the due care of the monitors, that there needs to be some sort of safeguards in place.
    So perhaps having to care for a smaller monitor first isn't the best option; maybe a scaled licensing fee? If you want a larger monitor, you pay a higher fee; that would deter a lot of people.

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    And [MENTION=40362]CrazyNut[/MENTION], I nearly had to get a beer for my own post, lol.
     
  3. imported-varanus

    imported-varanus Active Member

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    On the positive side, a small monitor is never capable of this sort of damage and will give you valuable insight into feeding response and reading a larger species. I agree, Gillens are a great starter, easy to maintain and breed, if you wish.
     

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  4. Stompsy

    Stompsy Subscriber Subscriber

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    And here I was thinking an Ackie bite on the tip of my finger was painful.....

    Yep, sticking with smaller species me thinks! :shock:
     
  5. phatty

    phatty Well-Known Member

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    luck my bite wasn't to bad just a bit of bleeding as she was only small and didn't thrash
     
  6. imported-varanus

    imported-varanus Active Member

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    This was purported to be an incident with a tree surgeon and a Lace Monitor. The story goes, he was removing it from the tree before it was lopped
     

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  7. Stompsy

    Stompsy Subscriber Subscriber

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    Those are some gnarly wounds right there!

    I feel like you're trying to scare me out of owning monitors at all!

    Although, in saying that, what kind of idiot would attempt to remove a wild monitor from a tree?
     
  8. BredliFreak

    BredliFreak Well-Known Member

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    Probably some Steve irwin wannabe bogan (that saying Steve irwin wouldn't use wild animals)

    Gotta love a bit of gore, especially when you find it on a moron (what can I say I am a sadist)
     
  9. imported-varanus

    imported-varanus Active Member

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    "I feel like you're trying to scare me out of owning monitors at all!" Not at all, Stompsy, just making the point that a "mistake" with a small monitor species is far less likely to have the long term consequences of the same mistake with a larger monitor. The first 3 were feeding response bites (bite and release) there's another level, the bite and shake, the stuff of nightmares.



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    [video=youtube_share;vDbSc8ghEio]https://youtu.be/vDbSc8ghEio[/video]
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2016
  10. Sheldoncooper

    Sheldoncooper Well-Known Member

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    Do u know anyone with lace monitor adults if so go and spend some time with them. I have 2 5ft bells females. One of them is a ***** the other is a angrier *****.
     
  11. Stompsy

    Stompsy Subscriber Subscriber

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    Uh. Wow.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  12. Stompsy

    Stompsy Subscriber Subscriber

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    I have absolutely no plans to get a Lacey! A small monitor will do me just fine.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  13. Sheldoncooper

    Sheldoncooper Well-Known Member

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    Gillens are an awesome monitor there entertaining
     
  14. CrazyNut

    CrazyNut Well-Known Member

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    Varanus doreanus can give very nasty bite. Venom is pretty nasty. As easy as Varanus gillenii are to keep, the problem arises with avaiablility, they can be a pain in the a*s to get a hold of. Great if you can get them though. A bit underated given they aren't spoken of too much is Varanus mertensi' alsthough not a first monitor, for someone that wants to transition into larger monitor, probably the best choice. Specers is another great choice for the same reason as mertensi'.

    Varanus brevicauda are up on my list. Need my advance. Not a difficult species from what I here, there size and stubby body make them one of the coolest and intersting of all native Varanus. I think I would take a brevi over giganteus if given the choice.
    [MENTION=38465]pinefamily[/MENTION] HA!
     
  15. Sheldoncooper

    Sheldoncooper Well-Known Member

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    I agree with mertensi probably being the best step up into larger monitors they are relatively easy to keep very rarely bite and dont have a hard bite like alot of monitors of a similar size. However getting tagged by the tail around the ears will make u swear.
     
  16. Smittiferous

    Smittiferous Subscriber Subscriber

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    Well, I just met my first gillens while at KVH this evening... I can see the appeal!
     
  17. pinefamily

    pinefamily Subscriber Subscriber

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    I went to buy a gillens from a breeder, and came home with a red ackie instead, lol. [MENTION=40362]CrazyNut[/MENTION], your post came close mate, lol.
     
  18. imported-varanus

    imported-varanus Active Member

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    Off topic, but, on the subject of Gillens:). Very nice little monitor, heaps of character.
     

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  19. Nero Egernia

    Nero Egernia Subscriber Subscriber

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    I see your point, and it's a good one. But the people who do generally research their chosen species are not likely to go on a forum and seek help, and so we are more likely to see those who realized a little too late that their new pet lizard may in fact be "too much" lizard for them. My post was not just directly aimed at large varanids however, it was also aimed at other "advanced" species. Still, the same could be said for someone who obtained a Beardy or a Carpet Python. How many of them do we see that are up for sale for various reasons such as "don't have the space" or "don't have the time that they deserve". While these species may not be particularly lethal, although a large Carpet Python may have the potential, there are still people who fail to research before obtaining their reptile. The same could be said for any animal for that matter. Domesticated animals such as dogs and horses could also prove lethal and yet it is not required to obtain a type of advanced licence to keep them.

    I don't think that comment is fair. Keeping a reptile is different from breeding. Both require different levels of understanding. It's also a good thing that people ask questions. They are showing a desire to learn.

    In regards to your suggestion of a scaled licensing fee, I believe that WA has a system fairly similar. The higher the category, the more expensive it is to acquire and to upkeep that licence. However, I have learned that some people who have the money and years to acquire the higher categories may not be well suited to keeping the "advanced" species at all. I have seen a few examples of this. Perhaps breeders of large varanids may be able to educate their prospective buyers, or at least point naive keepers towards a better species that best suits them.

    But this debate has been done numerous times and I understand everyone's points (the pictures and video are a nice touch). Once again I have derailed the thread, and I apologise for that. It's my opinion only, and it frustrates me that restrictions are put in place for those who can't be bothered to research their chosen species, and in doing so can diminish the keeping experience for those who have spent the time and effort to do things right.
     
  20. pinefamily

    pinefamily Subscriber Subscriber

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    [MENTION=41840]Oshkii[/MENTION], once again you have made a good argument for your point. It's not an easy fix, and I guess no matter what is put in place the idiots of the world will still manage to buy the reptiles. That's a good point about dogs in particular. When we went to the Animal Welfare League last year to adopt a dog, I was amazed at the number of "American staffy" types up for adoption. Same deal as the reptiles I guess, cute as puppies or good idea at the time, but then they grow and/or show bad behaviour traits (that's just a generalization BTW, I don't want a secondary line of debate on here lol).
    And I only used the example of the person asking about breeding to show my point about lack of research. We read nearly every book we could find when we got our first bredli, as well as read thread after thread on here. Sometimes I think there are some who just can't be bothered. These are the ones we are discussing. And while we might not agree on the way to do it, I think we are all on the same page for the end result: well looked after animals.
    And I have to apologise for going off topic as well. :)
     
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