Mother calls for croc cull after near miss

Discussion in 'Reptile News' started by News Bot, Apr 24, 2013.

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  1. News Bot

    News Bot Very Well-Known Member

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    A MOTHER whose son saw his dog killed by a crocodile near Darwin says the animals need to be culled and has vowed to get a gun licence.[​IMG][TABLE] border="0"
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    Published On: 24-Apr-13 06:31 PM
    Source: via NEWS.com.au

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  2. sd1981

    sd1981 Well-Known Member

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    I feel for her and her family, and this was a very near miss, but I believe that when she takes the gun as she has stated, she will most likely hit the person she would be trying to save... As a licenced firearms user, having used firearms under duress, the likelihood of her hitting her target from less than a few metres away is very slim, soldiers and law enforcement officers do train extensively to discharge a firearm under duress but even they get it wrong..... Maybe use a bit of sense when venturing into the water where you know that there is the possibility of croc inhabitation.... Just an opinion from outside looking in....
     
  3. mad_at_arms

    mad_at_arms Very Well-Known Member

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    Check out her facebook page, it screams redneck.
     
  4. longqi

    longqi Very Well-Known Member

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    She is only saying what actually needs to be done in many areas up North
    Doesnt matter what her other beliefs or lifestyle is
     
  5. PieBald

    PieBald Well-Known Member

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    Something does need to be done. Like humans leaving there.
    Crocs have been there for millions of years and survived ice ages, the mass extinction of dinosuars and the main killer of them all was man with a guns. If she wants something done she can start by leaving them alone and not letting her son walk in a croc area.
     
  6. Womagaunt

    Womagaunt Well-Known Member

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    +1 totally agree
     
  7. Darlyn

    Darlyn Very Well-Known Member

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    You have a good point regarding staying out of the water. The truth is that waterways that have been safe for 60 odd years are now host to crocs, as the croc population increases to ridiculous proportions. When people have crocs in their backyards and children can't go to school because there are crocs in the playground then there needs to be a change in thinking. Crocs have survived guns before (as you point out) so getting rid of crocs from populated areas should have no big impact at all.
     
  8. NickGeee

    NickGeee Subscriber Subscriber

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    I thought crocodiles were a vulnerable species.
    Are they ?
     
  9. Firepac

    Firepac Subscriber Subscriber

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    [h=2]Australian and State/Territory Government Legal Status[/h]



    The current conservation status of the Salt-water Crocodile, Crocodylus porosus, under Australian and State Government legislation, and under international conventions, is as follows:

    National: Listed as Marine and Migratory under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999.

    Queensland: Listed as Vulnerable under the Nature Conservation Act 1992.

    Western Australia: Listed as Otherwise Specially Protected under the Wildlife Conservation (Specially Protected Fauna) Notice 2003.

    Northern Territory: Listed as Least Concern under the Territory Parks and Wildlife Conservation Act 2009.

    International: Listed as Least Concern on the 2009 International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species.
     
  10. champagne

    champagne Well-Known Member

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    if you haven't been up north in the last few years you wouldn't understand.... the crocs population is growing and they aren't scared of humans. I went on a barra trip to the cape last year and had a crocs coming right up to the boat, even had one come up and have a taste of the motor. speaking to the locals its a common thing now.
     
  11. saintanger

    saintanger Very Well-Known Member

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    why do humans reslove all problems with killing, everyone knows there is crocs in nearly every water way up there. so why let you kids and dogs go in the water?

    lets say the python population goes up and a few kids get bitten per week going in the bush "their home" were they know they will be there, should we start a python culling?

    i agree some crocs shold be moved and a few rogue crocs that delibratly go after humans and have no fear of them might need to be killed, but i disagree with culling.
     
  12. Darlyn

    Darlyn Very Well-Known Member

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    They cull them now. Problem crocs are removed or shot. There is an industry waiting for trophy hunters to pay good money to shoot the crocs that will be shot anyway. If it's being done already it should be utilised as an industry that can employ indigenous people and generate an income. As humans debate and argue the points the years roll on and the crocs get bigger. Time to make a decision.
     
  13. Lachie3112

    Lachie3112 Not so new Member

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    Crocs have been there for a long time, and they have had their ups and downs (population wise). But this is the time now where unfortunately you can see what happens when you don't have any control measures in place for a species (dangerous) that resides populated areas. They don't have any natural predators, so you cannot rely on the food chain, and because of this they have lost their fear of humans and will become curious and continue to explore residential areas.

    In my opinion, there isn't a need to cull them to the point of extinction like we have seen in the past, but there is a need to reduce numbers in the NT in areas near population. This combined with an education program that tells people about the risks and what to do etc could help.
     
  14. Bluetongue1

    Bluetongue1 Guest

    The following quote is from the preface of the book “Crocodiles of Australia” by Webb and Manolis. These two academics have spent a lifetime researching these animals and are recognised as world authorities on our two crocodile species. The book goes back to 1989 so is getting a bit dated but the information it contains is still as relevant to day as it was back then. An excellent starting point to bring yourself upto speed with the realities of these animals ecologically....

    “In the decade following protection, and particularly in the Northern Territory, an enormous research effort was directed at Australia’s two crocodile species. The wild population increased under protection, and fears of extinction could be put aside. A widely held view that crocodile populations wee fragile entities needing careful nurturing proved erroneous. Both species are tenacious survivors. Man may ultimately dictate the size of the wild crocodile population in northern Australia but if the habitats remain intact, making crocodiles extinct may be virtually impossible.”

    If you really want to complain about mankind altering nature to his benefit, have a ***** about broad-acre farming. Millions of hectares of native habitat (usually called worthless scrub) chained and stone picked and tilled to allow wheat and sheep to be grown. Culling of croc populations within cooee of human habitation in northern Australian, to whatever degree, will have no ultimate effect on the viability of the long term survival of either species. After 40 plus years of shoot-on-sight anywhere and everywhere, they have recovered to the point where they are huge populations again and lots of larger individuals presenting problems in human populated areas. And that recovery has also occurred over 40 years.

    Destruction of habitat is what you need to worry about. Because we lose a two to three people each to crocs they tend to grab the lime light. They are not really what we need worry about. It is the myriad of animals that are lost when habitat is destroyed that we really should focus upon. Crocs have proven to be incredibly resilient and they can definitely cope with even mass culling in the vicinities of human habitation.

    The other side of the coin is that there are certain areas you don’t swim or allow pets in or stand in water to fish or even use a small tinny to do so, as they are designated croc habitats. We do need to strike a sensible balance between maintaining nature and making those areas occupied by significant human populations safe to use. Perhaps that is the crux of this thread?

    Blue
     
  15. champagne

    champagne Well-Known Member

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    have you been to northern Australia recently? As darlyn said there are places that haven't had crocs there for 60 years and know to be safe to swim that now have crocs moving in to them. Croc numbers can be managed sustainably and by doing so bring a much needed industry to the indigenous people of northern Australia. As for the python scenario, python don't posses a life threating risk to humans....
     
  16. myusername

    myusername Active Member

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    I tend to notice that, in general, the people who are for culling live up north (where there is a problem) and the people who are against culling live elsewhere. Now I don't mean to say anyone's opinion is invalid, but I feel that more weight should be given to those who are actually from the area where there is a problem.

    My uncle is a wildlife loving man and hates to see people kill things unnecessarily, but he told me after working and living up north and using the waterways, it was hard not to be of the opinion that a controlled cull would be in the north's best interest.
     
  17. mmafan555

    mmafan555 Well-Known Member

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    So it's only the Northern Territory that has had a Croc population explosion in recent years??? Queensland is a different story??
     
  18. longqi

    longqi Very Well-Known Member

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    Queenslands population is growing and they are spreading South
    Probably not as quickly as NT
    But definitely more now than a few years ago
     
  19. SteveNT

    SteveNT Very Well-Known Member

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    Dont get me started! And not just the crocs :)
     
  20. phatty

    phatty Well-Known Member

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    Most are from south us who are born know not to go near the water or are stupid

    Sent from my GT-I9210T using Tapatalk 2
     
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