Mouth rot help

Discussion in 'Herp Help' started by sharpy, Apr 17, 2016.

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  1. sharpy

    sharpy Subscriber Subscriber

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    My big Carpet has early signs of mouth rot. Whats the best treatment other than a vet please. Chlorhexidine, hydrogen peroxide., iodine or or even Listerine i have heard and in what amounts. Thanks
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2016
  2. pythoninfinite

    pythoninfinite Subscriber Subscriber

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    Mouth rot is often an indicator of a more systemic infection, often RI. It needs the attention of a vet. The only reason to avoid a vet visit is if you don't want to spend the money, however you are risking the wellbeing of the animal. Debriding the infected area in the mouth and using topical antiseptics is no guarantee of success, and won't work if the animal has a more deep seated infection.

    Both mouthrot and RI are issues related to poor husbandry - I would be questioning what caused the infection in the first place.

    Jamie
     
  3. sharpy

    sharpy Subscriber Subscriber

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    she damaged her mouth trying to escape from the cage i had her in. Constant rubbing im pretty sure main cause as her live-in B/F is in perfect condition
     
  4. Pauls_Pythons

    Pauls_Pythons Power Seller Power Seller

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    Mouth rot can also be a symptom of stress.
    Snake constantly trying to get out is also an indication of stress.
     
  5. sharpy

    sharpy Subscriber Subscriber

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    Well stress is a no brainer, thats why she wanted out. (Only in there two days) Not debating the cause, just wanted help tying to fix the problem before i went into a Vets front door and get charged $106 even before needles and creams. Thanks. She still eating just lower lip is getting worse.
     
  6. Pauls_Pythons

    Pauls_Pythons Power Seller Power Seller

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    Look at the basics, temps, hot spot v's ambient and how many hours a day, how many hides, hide sizes & location, light cycles etc.
    If it has mouth rot why are you even trying to feed and risk spreading the infection further?
    Coming up to winter, how old is the animal, does it need cooling, has it been wintered before, is it looking for a mate.

    If you have 2 in the same enclosure why? May be the animal wants to be on its own.

    With the information you provided it could be any of 1000 things.
    Look at' what has changed in the last few weeks. I suggest putting the animal back in its previous enclosure to start.
     
  7. sharpy

    sharpy Subscriber Subscriber

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    Its previous enclosure was the whole house. Look we have established it has mouth rot. all i like to know was there any "fixes" besides the vet to make her a happy animal. She is in a dry warm spot now. no stress at all but has mouth rot. She is the mother of the 29 babies im trying to sell. A perfect calm 11 ft female. 35 yrs of keeping pythons this is my 1st mouth rot. Just need advice to try and save me from the vet, thank you
     
  8. pythoninfinite

    pythoninfinite Subscriber Subscriber

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    Still, after all that, the vet's your best option. If the infection gets into the bone, then you'll have real issues trying to stop its progress. Now that the animal is in a satisfactory place, take it to the vet and get the infection dealt with. $106? How many of the babies you've got will it take to cover that cost? If she's presented you with 29 healthy bubs, you owe it to her to attend to her health issues promptly and effectively.

    Jamie
     
  9. sharpy

    sharpy Subscriber Subscriber

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    Well as for my original question, seems no one on this site has a answer. Going to vet in the morning to fork out around 200 bucks i was hoping to save as i really dont have that sort of money. Maybe they should rename this thread "State the Obvious" as that was all the replies i got. Must be someone who tried something
     
  10. Ekans

    Ekans Not so new Member

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    No, no one gave you a quick fix. Several people said to bring her to the vet as at home treatment isn't ideal in this situation.

    If you own animals you need to be aware vet visits are going to need to happen and they cost money. You keep mentioning you are reluctantly going to 'fork out' money to go to the vets. Doesn't sound like you care enough about the well being of the animal that is making you money.
     
  11. GBWhite

    GBWhite Well-Known Member

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    Ummm, you did get an answer. There are no "fixes" without assistance from a vet. Thought Jamie made that pretty clear. If there was a way to fix it without a visit to a vet you would have got the answer.

    Best of luck with your critter.

    George
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2016
  12. Pauls_Pythons

    Pauls_Pythons Power Seller Power Seller

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    Such a greatful, giving soul as you would have no problem parting with some of the funds you are to recoup from the sale of 29 hatchies this girl has given you. She must be so thankful to be with such a caring owner who goes to extreme measures to maintain her health.
    If you had toothache would you be happy for me to get my pliers out?
     
  13. africancichlidau

    africancichlidau Almost Legendary

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    Here Here!

    - - - Updated - - -

    35 years keeping pythons should mean you have the experience to know when you need a vet.
     
  14. sharpy

    sharpy Subscriber Subscriber

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    So when did me asking for advice on treatment become a bashing for me not taking my snake to the vet. Almost every answer is to take it to the vet, That wasnt the question. Seem everyone has the opinion i dont look after my snakes. more than likely ive been looking after pythons longer legally then half this site(non licenced even longer). I just wanted to know if any treatment and in what strength helped. Does everyone here take there car/bike to the mechanic if it has a blown headlight or runs rough. Do they ring the plumber because the tap leaks? Do they ring Jim because the grass has grown too long? NO, they seek help 1st to try and not spend the money they dont have. Money for me isnt a luxury and i was trying to save some with a remedy that seems on here no on has tried. As for selling the babies, no one is buying any as the market was flooded some ten years ago from people trying to get rich quick selling snakes. What was a $150 sound investment is a pet that lives longer than 25 years is now worth only 50 buck and even then there is no response. So dont go on about me not looking after my pythons and i wont ask for help to try and save a few bucks i dont friggn have!
     
  15. pythoninfinite

    pythoninfinite Subscriber Subscriber

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    Look, back in the 50s & 60s, when I was kid, mouthrot was common in captive pythons because we had almost no understanding about correct husbandry for these critters. We also used to use stuff like flywire (the metal stuff) in our cages because we didn't know better, and there was no obvious alternative. This stuff acts like a cheese grater on snake noses, and because the means of heating (if it was even used) was hit & miss, mouthrot and RI were common, either individually or working hand-in-hand with each other to eventually kill your snake.
    There were none of the fantastic bits of equipment available today, and nothing like the internet to get immediate help or advice. Despite your suggestion that no one has tried the remedies you offered, I can assure you that for many years, before reptile vets even existed, these remedies were all that were available to us, and their effectiveness was always questionable. For mouthrot (infectious stomatitis) we often used Listerine, but with very mixed results - it is not a reliable remedy, and the infection can still progress quietly and deeply into the bone, with eventually fatal results. Antibiotic therapy is likely to be 100% successful in treating your animal, with a prompt and permanent return to good health. It's the best, and in my opinion, the only option. Selling two or three of the babies she's presented you with, or even if you have to offer more as a bulk lot to a dealer, would seem to be a small contribution to her continued good health.

    I sympathise with you with regard to the scarcity of funds - we all face these crises at different times, and I, too, am reluctant to spend money on unnecessary vet bills. (Just yesterday here I counselled a newbie against being conned into the totally pointless, but expensive, "annual health check" for their otherwise healthy reptile. In my opinion an ethical vet would see a new keeper once, tell them what to look out for that may need a vet's attention, and send them on their way (but I guess they have businesses to run and expenses to cover).

    Your ungrateful response to the advice offered here makes you look selfish and sulky. I couldn't offer you the advice you wanted to hear, sorry about that, but it was my impression that you wanted to fix the problem.

    Jamie
     
  16. JackTheHerper

    JackTheHerper Well-Known Member

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    If you're not willing to look after your investment don't invest in the bloody thing, sell it or something because it doesn't deserve to be owned by an individual such as yourself.

    It's the same for any animal be it dog,cat,bird,fish,crocodile if you are not prepared or cannot afford to look after it don't bloody buy it, I've got 3 dogs only because i know i can look after them, Would i get a snake? No because i know i couldn't afford to look after it.

    Use some Common bloody sense.
     
  17. Wokka

    Wokka Well-Known Member APS Veteran

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    Peoples circumstances change. Animals generally live for years and there is a good chance that some owners will hit bad luck during the life of their animal.i don't know that abusing the owner helps the pet too much. Perhaps it helps the abuser. perhaps offering alternative options might provide an option which hasn't been considered.
     
  18. Wally

    Wally Subscriber Subscriber

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  19. pythonlover1984

    pythonlover1984 Not so new Member

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    i hope you snake gets better soon, some vets have payment plans that you can ask for, so if you do not have money then- maybe see if they got a payment plan that they can offer you... yeah animals can be expensive no matter what- please mate, if you do not know what they are doing as this was your first time your snake got mouth rot, then it would be a good factor as they are qualified to treat the problem..
    talking about vets, i am taking my beaded dragon; once a week for 4 weeks to the vet as she is not gaining weight- you recan i care about the money factor.. no as i love her and i would do anything for my animals, so please understand that we can give you empathy that you do not have much money and you love your animals but trust me mate, you would not forgive yourself if you accidentally kill her would you!! as you do not know what you doing as your a breeder and look after them but your not qualified as an veterinarian are you!!
     
  20. Ekans

    Ekans Not so new Member

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    The difference here is a bike, car, lawnmower etc are inanimate objects.

    Your question was what can I do at home? and the answer was you can't do anything as no one who replied has tried at home care and instead have taken their reptiles to the vet and given you advice to do so.

    I don't know if you realise how risky it is trying to give someone advice on how to care for their pet at home is. What if it's bad advice and the animal dies? What if you held the person giving the advice liable?
     
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