Need help children’s python not moving

Discussion in 'Herp Help' started by hamom8, Jun 10, 2018.

  1. hamom8

    hamom8 New Member

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    Hi my children’s python has buried itself under the aspen snake bedding and hasn’t moved from the same spot in 3 days he is usually very active and feeds every time and he shed last week, under his hide it’s 31-32c on the heatmat but he is on the cool side under the bedding not moving I checked to see if he was still alive and he striked a couple times out of the bedding lol so I’ve left him and he hasn’t moved since I’m really worried about him he’s my first snake I’m in Sydney and it’s quite cold atm is he brumating he was due for a feed today but I didn’t want to disturb him he hasn’t moved at all please help not sure what to do thanks
    --- Automatic Post Merged, Jun 10, 2018, Original Post Date: Jun 10, 2018 ---
    He is a juvenile t+ albino and is on fuzzy mice
    --- Automatic Post Merged, Jun 10, 2018 ---
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    Woah is that a cactus in the enclosure?
     
  3. hamom8

    hamom8 New Member

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    Yea exo terra one
     
  4. GBWhite

    GBWhite Well-Known Member

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    Snakes need to thermoregulate to maintain their body temperature within certain boundaries and do this by moving away from the heat to cool off once they have reached their desired optimum temperature. It's under the substrate because it's looking to find a secure, safe place where it can rest and cool down and you don't have a hide in that area of the enclosure.

    ps: Fake or real I don't think it's a good idea to have a cactus in the enclosure.
     
  5. hamom8

    hamom8 New Member

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    Thank you for the reply I’ll take it out it climbs on it lol ordered another small hide for the cool side is it normal that it’s been there for 3 days not moved at all
     
  6. Bl69aze

    Bl69aze Very Well-Known Member

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    Yes, it is normal, I suppose it just looks not normal because he’s under the substrate

    He also looks a bit pale, he could be getting ready to shed
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2018
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  7. Scutellatus

    Scutellatus Well-Known Member

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    It is an Exo-Terra cactus designed for reptile enclosures, I don't see the issue.
    If you like it in there @hamom8, then keep it in there. It won't do any harm to your snake, if anything it adds enrichment value.
     
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  8. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    Agree 110%
     
  9. Bl69aze

    Bl69aze Very Well-Known Member

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    I can’t see any problems, the “spikes” are soft and not hard, if anything it’s something for it to start shedding on
     
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  10. hamom8

    hamom8 New Member

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    Is soft as you guys acting like it’s a real cactus he was on top of it the other day lol I took it out anyway so I got more room for the 2nd hide
     
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  11. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    All good, it's obviously not the same as all the fake cacti I use in my desert scorp and desert T setups. These are far from soft, they're every bit as sharp and rigid as a real deal cactus and the spines separate from the main body easily. I got one lodged under my thumb nail once whilst hastily trying to remove a cricket from a scorp's enclosure that had just shed. Honestly would have been less painful to grab the scorp and let it tag me! Lol

    All good if your cactus is soft-spined... mine are not and I defs wouldn't put them in my python's enclosures. ;)
     
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  12. hamom8

    hamom8 New Member

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    Haha yea I wouldn’t have it in their if it would harm it
     
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  13. Scutellatus

    Scutellatus Well-Known Member

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    We better collect all the sharp sticks and rocks from the bush then.
    Snakes might HURT themselves!
     
  14. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    Are you personally responsible financially for the well being of all the snakes in the bush? Well you better hop to it then.
    --- Automatic Post Merged, Jun 11, 2018, Original Post Date: Jun 11, 2018 ---
    Good work. The hobby of keeping herps in captivity is already expensive enough without taking unnecessary risks which could lead to expensive but easily preventable veterinary bills. ;)
     
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