NSW shops gets the go ahead

Discussion in 'Reptile News' started by Amazing Amazon, Mar 22, 2013.

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  1. borntobnude

    borntobnude Guest

    OK so i may be old but i think i need someone to explain !!
    There is a list of comercially available species . Where does that leave all of the others ? Yes i understand that they are still legal so therefore still able to be traded in "Mcdonalds Carparks " ? . but isn't this what "they " are trying to eliminate ??

    so after reding Way too much i am confused . They asked for help and advice from Herpers and it was given , They didnt like it , shut the door threw a tanti did it their own way and we now seem to have a lot of wishy washy pages to sift through

    Or is it just me ( and I have even printed the code so i can read it at my leisure )
     
  2. jacorin

    jacorin Well-Known Member

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    no its not just you born lolol
     
  3. borntobnude

    borntobnude Guest


    Lucky i was going to ask for a plain and simple edition , but if it's just me CARRY ON :lol:
     
  4. jacorin

    jacorin Well-Known Member

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    :lol::lol::lol:
     
  5. dr_juggalo

    dr_juggalo Not so new Member

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    That was the point I was making, I have been researching and she bought it with the impulse
     
  6. -Peter

    -Peter Guest

    "Turtles have been getting trapped for a long while ,they will get trapped more to feed the supply.
    Its because there isnt any big commercial suppliers and as far as i can see on the DECCW website there wont be any ,just commercial reptile dealers with shops ,hobbyists that cant be commercial etc."



    thats because they are escaped pets, you can tell because they come out and swim around when you put them in your tank, well when I say tank I really mean black recycling bin.
     
  7. zulu

    zulu Very Well-Known Member

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    thats because they are escaped pets, you can tell because they come out and swim around when you put them in your tank, well when I say tank I really mean black recycling bin.

    Yeh pete ,the old turtle swimming around the plastic recycling bin trick,all is revealed home sweet home grasshopper!
     
  8. wokka

    wokka Guest

    some buyers chose convenience over price.
    Most orange buyers buy oranges at super market prices, whilst the orange growers dump oranges in the paddock effecively free.
     
  9. mcloughlin2

    mcloughlin2 Well-Known Member

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    I think the general threat to wild populations will be minimal. Your general person is not going to put in the effort and time it takes to catch a suitably sized animal. Not many people want a full grown turtle, they want the cute 50c piece turtle. In my time herping I've seen probably 50+ long neck turtles. Of them I've found a single turtle in a crystal clear dam that was 50c size, one about the size of your palm and all the others have been nearly or at full size. So not very good odds. This is from dozens of trips and thousands worth in fuel.
     
  10. zulu

    zulu Very Well-Known Member

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    Baby long necks ,macquaries and saw shells were in some petshops in the hundreds in the early 1970s i seen them and theres no way they were captive bred.
     
  11. FAY

    FAY Guest

    From what I have heard zulu...way back then they were the Mary River turtles that was in petshops. Read it somewhere lol
     
  12. zulu

    zulu Very Well-Known Member

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    Hi fay ive heard that also, they would go in runs, allot of juvenile longs necks ,the emydura that looked like maquaries and the ones that i thought was saw shells.
    The saw shells could of been mary river or partly made up of that species ,allot of the types were not described at that time.
    They sold adult long neck and short necked turtles also, the baby long necks were 3$ each and they had the line that they were penny turtles that didnt get bigger and thats probably because they died LOL
    Actually faye, i remember the owner of the petshop in cabramatta telling me that the baby long necks were from siam , sign of things to come.
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2013
  13. Amazing Amazon

    Amazing Amazon <span style="font-weight:bold;color:#B200FF;">Amaz

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    I don't think letting NSW sell Murray River Turtles is the greatest of ideas. How long before unwanted ones end up in the Macleay River? Look at the mess it has caused in QLD.
     
  14. zulu

    zulu Very Well-Known Member

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    Probably already mixed populations along with other eastern rivers,we dont even know where allot of populations came from ,the hawkesbury nepean and hacking river type are probably petshopiis.
    There is red eared sliders in the macleay, a mate of mine caught one crossing the road near the river and released it back, so theres a bonus species !
     
  15. Amazing Amazon

    Amazing Amazon <span style="font-weight:bold;color:#B200FF;">Amaz

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    Can all Emydura maquarii species be sold under the Murray Turtle banner as in Victoria? Seems strange they would list them as Emydura maquarii and not Emydura maquarii macquarii.
     
  16. Bushman

    Bushman Very Well-Known Member

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    For this reason and to guard against a trend towards hybridization in the hobby, taxonomy should err on the side of splitting in my opinion. Two examples that immediately come to mind are the Morelia spilota complex and Emydura macquarii ssp. Wells and Wellington's widely accepted division of the former should persevere in the licence system imo. Likewise, John Cann's Emydura macquarii split into distinct subspecies should continue to be recognised for the sake of maintaining regional integrity.

    The legalization of the sale of reptiles in pet shops is not necessarily a bad thing. It will not only help the reptile keeping hobby grow, but it will help undemonize (if that's a word) or normalize reptiles in Australian society. When the general public see herps in pet shops and in peoples homes, the increased exposure will desensitize the fear in most people. Wider acceptance of reptiles and amphibians as pets will also help dispel the old mentality of 'the only snake is a dead snake'.

    A lot of keepers seem to be upset about a code of practice and minimum cage sizes in particular. Larger enclosure sizes in many cases will benefit herps by giving them more room to move about. Keeping herps in very small plastic tubs and rack systems will increasingly become a thing of the past. I believe that exceptions need to be made for the provision of hatchlings and sick/injured/recovering animals, where it's both practical and beneficial to house them in small/compact and sterile enclosures like plastic tubs. As long as the wildlife authorities take these exceptions into consideration and not be overzealous in enforcing general rules, then I don't foresee a problem with the new developments.
    There seems to be much ado about nothing and the current hysteria is being fueled by exaggerated concerns about animal welfare and financial loss by those with something to lose.

    All this regulation by wildlife authorities may be over sooner than many think anyway, as with the incorporation and normalization of Australian wildlife as pets, NPWS will no longer be responsible for monitoring (read law enforcement) of them, as they increasingly are seen as pets rather than wildlife.
    NPWS and other wildlife authorities can then make better use their resources to protect and preserve National Parks and wildlife habitat, as they were originally meant to do.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2013
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